Wentworth Institute of Technology factbook 2010 Issue #31



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Wentworth Institute of Technology




FACTBOOK

2010


Issue #31





3

Foreword 4

History 5

Administrative Officers 18

Administrative Officers (cont.) 20

Associate Vice Presidents 20

Academic Department Heads 20

Administrative Department Heads and Directors 21

Spring Commencement Speakers 22

Programs of Study 29

International Programs 31

Co-op Schedule 32

Alumni Library 34

Long-term Goals 36

Accreditations 37














































Foreword

Momentum and milestones! In 2010, Wentworth Institute of Technology has achieved many key successes that will shape the Institute moving forward. At the center of these historic milestones is the enhanced educational opportunities provided to our students. Wentworth continues to advance its leadership position in engineering, technology, design, and management education.


A shift and strategic expansion to include more engineering-focused undergraduate degree programs has resulted in the upcoming launch of biomedical engineering, electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering programs. Building on our practical, hands-on, experiential education model and existing strengths and competencies, these programs will respond to the needs of students and industry. Students entering into these majors will be challenged by the addition of more theoretical-based content, open-ended problem solving, and an increased focus on design and analysis. Wentworth will clearly differentiate itself from other colleges and universities with these new programs. For example, our biomedical engineering program will set us apart as it will focus on devices and instrumentation, and we will leverage our proximity to and relationship with the Longwood Medical Area.
Building on the success of the Master of Architecture program, Wentworth commenced a Master of Science in Construction Management, giving construction professionals the opportunity to learn management principles that will help them advance in their careers. Offering new master’s programs represents a logical progression for our graduate-level education, and it reflects the Institute’s carefully managed growth. These programs reinforce the importance of close collaboration with industry to meet workforce demands.
Another significant milestone for Wentworth is an academic restructuring from seven departments into four colleges: College of Architecture, Design, and Construction Management; College of Arts and Sciences; College of Engineering and Technology; and College of Professional and Continuing Education. This new academic organizational structure was created to address the need to provide interdisciplinary, project-based curricula, which will increase the educational opportunities for students and ensure robust academic leadership in each college through new dean and department chair positions.
To address Wentworth’s facilities and infrastructure needs, the foundation is in place for new building construction and renovation projects to begin in 2011 focused on the student experience, both academically and socially.
Our students remain committed to the communities in which we live and are involved with meaningful projects that benefit them personally and professionally and have a positive impact on others.
It’s truly an exciting time to be at Wentworth.

zorica pantic black

Zorica Pantić, E.E., Ph.D.

President

History


On April 5, 1904, Wentworth Institute was chartered for the purpose of “providing education in the mechanical arts” as instructed by the will of Arioch Wentworth, who died in 1903. Arioch Wentworth was a working man who earned his fortune in the marble business and in real estate. It is said that he had unusual mechanical ability, but as a young man he was unable to find employment in this area because of his lack of special training. Thus, he had an interest in providing the opportunity for training in the mechanical arts for other young men.

By 1909, the Trust income from his bequest had generated enough money to commence construction of the first group of buildings on a parcel of land purchased the previous year at the corner of Huntington Avenue and Ruggles Street in Boston. On September 25, 1911, Wentworth Institute officially opened its doors with an entering class of 244 day students and 467 evening students.

From the outset, both day and evening courses have been offered. The day programs originally included one-year apprentice courses for young men desiring to become skilled workmen and two-year courses for those wishing additional practical experience in preparation for positions as superior workmen, master mechanics, or foremen. The evening courses were intended for those already employed in industry and planned to increase efficiency in their present occupations or advance their careers. Courses of instruction included carpentry and building, electrical wiring, plumbing, machine work, pattern making, foundry practice, machine construction and tool design, and electrical construction and operation.

In 1956, the Wentworth charter was amended to read as follows: “to furnish education in the mechanical arts, including engineering, with the power to grant the junior college degree of associate in engineering, to engage in research associated with such education and to engage in other activities in the pursuit of such education and research.”

In 1970, Wentworth College of Technology was chartered by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as a senior college of technology with the right to grant Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology degrees; in 1972 the first women enroll full-time at Wentworth and in 1975, the cooperative education program was founded; and in 1977, Wentworth College of Technology was merged with Wentworth Institute and the name was changed to Wentworth Institute of Technology.

In 1984, the charter was amended “to authorize the Institute to grant degrees at the associate and baccalaureate levels in science, engineering, and technology.”

In 1992, the East Coast Aero Technical School was moved to the East Coast Aero and Technical School Park (formerly the ComTech building); and in 1993, two new five-year Bachelor of Science in Engineering degrees (electromechanical and environmental) were instituted in place of three Bachelor of Science in Engineering Degrees (mechanical, civil, and electrical) that were terminated in 1990.

Students could, until recently, enroll in nine programs leading to the associate in applied science degree, seven certificate of graduation programs, ten programs leading to the bachelor of science in engineering technology degree, three programs leading to the bachelor of science in engineering degree, and the five-year professional degree in architecture.

In 1994, there were further changes to Wentworth's curriculum offerings: the option for an entering new day student became one of 17 baccalaureate curricula while the evening/weekend students' options under the Division of Professional and Continuing Studies became five baccalaureate degrees, seven Associate in Applied Science degrees, and one Associate in Technology degree.

In 1992, the Black and Gold Society established to honor alumni marking a 50th reunion year or more from Wentworth; in 1996, Sweeney Field dedicated, providing a home for soccer, softball, and lacrosse. The same year the Colleges of the Fenway (COF) consortium was established, with Wentworth being a founding member; in 1997, completion of Wentworth’s third capital campaign ($10.8 million); and in 1999, Wentworth, Williston, and Dobbs Hall were renovated to comply with the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

In 2001, a 413-bed Residence Hall opens at 610 Huntington Avenue.; in 2003, the Wentworth Community Service and Learning Program was established (now known as Wentworth’s Center for Community and Learning Partnerships); in 2004, Wentworth celebrated its Centennial Anniversary; in 2005, a new Residence Hall at 555 Huntington Avenue was completed and opened to students for the fall semester; and as part of a new technology initiative, all incoming 2005 fall semester students received a laptop computer.

In addition to the new building mentioned above, the campus physical plant has expanded since 1909 to include Williston Hall and the Power House (1910); Wentworth Hall (1914); Dobbs Hall (1916); Watson Hall (1927); Kingman Hall (1945); dormitory property on Evans Way (1955); the Collins Building (1957); the Plainville Campus (1958); Wilson Hall (1962); Edwards and Rodgers dormitories (1966); Mickelson Hall and Beatty Hall (1967); the Nelson Recreation Building (1970); Baker Hall dormitory and the Science Laboratory Building (1972); the Ira Allen Building (1980); Boston Trade High School (1983); land on Parker Street (1984); and ComTech Park in Concord (1991).

To continue this brief history of Wentworth, it is necessary to mention the individuals who have served as its chief administrative officers.

Arthur L. Williston, a graduate of Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.), was employed in 1910 to plan and oversee the first buildings erected on the campus. From this position, he became the principal when the Institute opened for students in 1911. Williston had served on the M.I.T. and Ohio State University faculties, was a member of the commission that established the Carnegie Technical Schools in Pittsburgh, and was head of Pratt Institute’s School of Science and Technology for twelve years. He served from February 1910 to June 1923. After his death, his will established a trust administered by the Boston Foundation, from which Wentworth has received funds in support of its educational programs.

Frederick E. Dobbs succeeded Arthur Williston as principal on February 25, 1924, and retired in 1951. His service of 27 years was longer than any of the other leaders who have filled this position. He came to Wentworth from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, N.Y., as an instructor when Mr. Williston was recruiting the original faculty. Upon his retirement, he joined the Ford Foundation to assist in the formation of technical schools, patterned after Wentworth, in the Middle and Far East.

Dr. H. Russell Beatty, the first president of Wentworth Institute, was appointed on July 1, 1953, and served until June 30, 1971. He was instrumental in founding Wentworth College of Technology, and served as its president from November 20, 1969, to June 30, 1972. He also came to Wentworth from Pratt Institute where he was dean of engineering and assistant to the president.

Dr. Edward T. Kirkpatrick succeeded Dr. Beatty as president of Wentworth Institute on July 1, 1971, and as president of Wentworth College of Technology on July 1, 1972. He came to Wentworth from Rochester Institute of Technology where he served as dean of the college of engineering. Under his leadership Wentworth became a co-educational institution, initiated a cooperative education program, established a weekend college, and merged the Institute and the College. Dr. Kirkpatrick also was responsible for the 1986 acquisitions of the Sylvania Technical School (renamed Wentworth Technical School) and East Coast Aero Technical School, which became divisions of Wentworth Technical Schools, Inc. 

During Dr. Kirkpatrick's presidency, Wentworth joined the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in 1984; the baseball team won two (1989 and 1990) Commonwealth Coast Conference (CCC) championships; and the rugby team won the New England Rugby Football Union (NERFU) Division III championship in 1990.

Dr. John F. Van Domelen succeeded Dr. Kirkpatrick on July 1, 1990, as president of Wentworth Institute of Technology and Wentworth Technical Schools, Inc. He came to Wentworth after sixteen years at Vermont's Norwich University, where he most recently served as vice president for academic affairs and dean of faculty.

Under his presidency, the ComTech building in Concord was purchased in 1991. The rugby team won the NERFU Division III championship a second time in 1991. The East Coast Aero and Technical School, which was purchased in 1986, was sold in 1996. In 1995, the baseball team won a berth in the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC) post-season playoffs, the first-ever post-season appearance for any Wentworth intercollegiate team. The Wentworth Technical Schools, Inc. (gift to Wentworth in 1986 and renamed from Sylvania Technical School) was closed in 1996.  Wentworth's baseball team won its third CCC post-season championship during the 1996 campaign. Also in 1996, the Myles Elliot & Eugenia Louise Sweeney Field was completed and dedicated. The men's soccer team, in the fall of 1996, won its first CCC post-season championship.

To cap 1996, the Colleges of the Fenway Consortium was established by President Van Domelen and his colleagues of the other four participating schools: Emmanuel College, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences, Simmons College, and Wheelock College. In 1999, the Massachusetts College of Art was added to the list of schools, raising the number of Colleges of the Fenway to six. Consortium tenets permit and encourage students of all six institutions to cross register at any other Consortium school. Another benefit is the potential for cost savings of combining purchasing, insurance, food services, health services, and other business activities, for the participating schools.

The men's basketball team won the 1996-97 CCC post-season championship and earned Wentworth's first-ever National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) post-season playoff participation. In 1998, the team won its second straight CCC post-season championship and earned the school's second ECAC post-season appearance.

Men's ice hockey, elevated to intercollegiate status in 1992, won its first-ever championship, finishing on top of the ECAC South Conference for the 1997-98 season. In winning that championship, the ice hockey team earned a spot in the ECAC post-season playoffs, Wentworth's third ECAC appearance.

During 1998, a major renovation of Williston Hall’s second floor was completed and opened as the upgraded executive offices suite. This was followed in 1999 by a major renovation of the second and third floor of Wentworth Hall and the third floor of Williston Hall. The second and third floors of Wentworth Hall provide a number of full-media classrooms and seminar rooms for educational purposes. The third floor of Williston Hall provided additional upgraded office space for much of the Development Division as well as for several major functions of the Business and Finance Division.

Late in 2000, a Student Services Center was developed in the spaces formerly occupied by the foundry and machine shop functions. This space offered the opportunity to collocate offices (the Registrar, Student Financial Aid, and Student Financial Services) that directly support and impact students' financial and academic records and processes for the Institute. The men's ice hockey team, in 2000, won the ECAC Northeast regular season championship and went on to win the post-season tournament and garner an NCAA berth (the second in school history) for the national championship.

The year 2001 was memorable for the dedication of Wentworth's new 473-bed residence hall located at 610 Huntington Avenue. The residence hall expanded the Institute's resident student capacity to approximately 60 percent of the total day, full-time student population thus enabling Wentworth to become a truly residential campus for the first time in its history. Another historical event was the honoring of Trustee Sinclair Weeks, Jr., for his fifty years of service to Wentworth Institute, Wentworth College, and Wentworth Institute of Technology as a member of the Board of Trustees. Mr. Weeks has seen, during his tenure as a Trustee, quite literally, all of the change that has occurred at the Institute.

The 2002 academic event of note was the accreditation of Wentworth’s two five-year engineering programs: Electromechanical Engineering and Environmental Engineering. The Engineering Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (EAC/ABET) accredited both engineering programs for a period of six years, the maximum period of time for which EAC/ABET will accredit. In the sports arena, the Women’s Soccer team won its first-ever post-season berth with an ECAC appearance and the Men’s Ice Hockey team won its second conference championship in three years, going on once again to the final eight NCAA playoffs for the national championship.

The year 2003 witnessed a continuation of efforts to expand and improve residential life on the Boston campus with early work being accomplished on the road to establishing a residence hall at 555 Huntington Avenue. The Management of Technology and Project Management programs received professional accreditation from the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education. Athletics was again successful with a mirror image of the 2002 effort: Women’s Soccer again captured an ECAC post-season bid and Men’s Ice Hockey won its third conference championship in four years; which took them to the final eight and the national NCAA playoffs.

Wentworth’s Centennial Celebration, surrounded by progress in all areas of the Institute, was the centerpiece of calendar year 2004. Wentworth’s position in the world of engineering and technology was recognized from the City of Boston, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and the Congress of the United States. The Centennial Gala, held in both Watson Hall and Tansey Gymnasium, was attended by upwards of 600 people from all facets of the Wentworth community. Two thoughtful remembrances of the event were given to each attendee: A copy of the recently published Wentworth history book, “A Century of Honesty, Energy, Economy, System,” and a bottle of Wentworth Champagne, especially bottled for the event by an alumnus. Several other Centennial events were held during the year, including the two most notable among them being a special Founder’s Day and the establishment of the Centennial Museum. Founder’s Day was celebrated with an Academic Convocation that featured speaker Dean Kamen and was attended by students, faculty, staff, trustees, and alumni. The Centennial Museum operated during the entire period of the founding year celebrations and featured images, faculty work, student work, papers, books, and objects representing the history of Wentworth from its earliest years through the very latest progress under President Van Domelen.

Dr. Zorica Pantić succeeded President Van Domelen on August 1, 2005, as the fourth president of Wentworth Institute of Technology and the first female president in the history of the Institute. At the time of her appointment she also became the only female engineer to lead an institute of technology in the United States.

She came to Wentworth from the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) where she served as the Founding Dean of the College of Engineering and was one of the 11 female engineering deans in the nation. Previously, she was a faculty at San Francisco State University for 12 years, and, the last four, served as the Director of the School of Engineering. Dr. Pantić came to Wentworth as a change agent to help move the Institute to the next level of excellence.

The same year the new residence hall at 555 Huntington Avenue was completed and opened to students for the fall semester. In addition, as part of a new technology initiative, all incoming 2005 fall semester students received a laptop computer.



In October 2005, President Pantić appoints the first-ever Strategic Planning Steering Committee (SPSC) and charged both this group and the Long Range Planning Committee (LRPC) of the Board of Trustees to develop a five year Strategic Plan.
After a campus-wide collaborative effort, a five year Strategic Plan, covering the years 2006-2011, is presented to the September 2006 Board of Trustees meeting for ratification. The Board approves the Strategic Plan, which goes into effect in October of 2006. In the same year, Chairman William N. Whelan, EEP '63, stepped down as Chairman of the Board of Trustees, after six years of distinguished service in that position, and David W. Kruger, ’03 (Hon.), was elected Chairman of the Board, effective September 2006.
A noticeable achievement in the 2006 Wentworth athletics department was the winning of the Commonwealth Coast Conference championship and a trip to the NCAA finals by the men’s basketball team.
In spring 2007 Wentworth starts “Students Loving Adventures in Math” (SLAM) program which focuses on strengthening math achievement, especially among women and underrepresented minority groups. In the summer, the first “Science, Technology, Engineering and Math” (STEM) program is launched with aim to inspire students interest in math and science subjects and their applications in the engineering professions. In the fall of 2007, a new fitness center opens in Beatty Hall, in collaboration with the Colleges of the Fenway. The Center for Community & Learning Partnerships (CLP) along with faculty members and several students, visited New Orleans on two occasions in 2007 to offer post hurricane Katrina reconstruction assistance.
Although no major new construction occurred in 2007, several buildings underwent renovations to accommodate academic space demands. The Architectural Studio in Annex North added junior and senior labs to increase the number of work-stations and facilitate master’s degree studios. Two rooms in Annex Central, as well as space in Beatty Hall and Wentworth Hall, were converted to classrooms. The Annex wing was reconstructed to provide space for a conference room; the Shawmut Conference Center was donated and built by Shawmut Design and Construction; and a new project room and five offices were constructed for the department of Civil, Construction and Environmental engineering.
Two strategically important real estate acquisitions were made in 2007. Two former gas stations, one at the corner of Huntington Ave. & Ward Street and the other at the corner of Huntington Avenue & Ruggles Street, were acquired and razed. The parcels were converted to open space. The owners of the first gas station, Maria and Kosta Papoulidis, gifted a substantial portion of that property to the Institute.
In 2008 The “Kosta and Maria Papoulides Quadrangle” was dedicated on the corner of Ward Street and Huntington Avenue, in recognition of the generous gift received by the named honorees. In the same year, generous philanthropist and Wentworth corporator, William “Bill” Flanagan, Machine Construction and Tool Design ’51, made the largest gift in the Institute’s history, a $10 million dollar charity gift annuity. This gift will be used for the construction of a new campus center to be named in Mr. Flanagan’s honor.
The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching selects Wentworth for the classification “Community Engagement” under the section “Curricular Engagement & Outreach and Partnerships”. The classification represents Wentworth’s commitment to service learning and civic engagement. In addition, the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll is awarded by President Bush to WIT for extraordinary and exemplary community service contributions.
On July 30, 2008, WIT submits a proposal to NEASC for its first graduate degree program, the Master of Architecture (MArch). On November 19, 2008, NEASC notifies WIT that the proposal was accepted and the Institute could proceed with its plans to offer a MArch degree.
In athletics, the men’s hockey team qualified for the ECAC Northeast Tournament for the twelfth consecutive season and earned their seventh trip to the conference championship game since 2000, the most of any school in the league. Qualifying for The Commonwealth Coast Conference (TCCC) tournaments were: Baseball team, for the third straight season and the Lacrosse team for the twelfth consecutive season. The mixed rifle team qualified for the Mid-Atlantic Rifle Conference Championships.
On April 6, 2009 a NEASC team conducts a site visit in regards to the Institute’s application for the MArch degree. On September 18, 2009 NEASC’s Commission on Institutions of Higher Learning officially accepts Wentworth’s application to offer the MArch degree. The program was offered for the first time to the Fall 2009 entering class.
On February 23, 2010, Wentworth presented a lecture by former presidential candidate Ralph Nader, entitledPublic Citizenship, Ethics, and Engineering.” Wentworth also hosted the Associated Schools of Construction (ASC) 46th Annual International Conference: Building a Global Vision, which was held at the Marriott Long Wharf Hotel from April 7-10. On May 7-8, 2010, Wentworth hosted the American Society for Engineering Education Conference.

2010 also saw several changes to Wentworth’s academic curriculum. The Master of Science in Construction Management (MSCM) program was launched, and the Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering programs were also introduced. On November 18, 2010, Wentworth announced its intent to restructure its academic programs. This undertaking sorted Wentworth’s existing programs into four colleges: the College of Architecture, Design, and Construction Management; the College of Arts and Sciences; the College of Engineering and Technology; and the College of Professional and Continuing Education. The reorganization plan went into effect in January 2011.

Wentworth continued to show its dedication to philanthropic and humanitarian projects in 2010. On September 16, 2010, Wentworth alumnus Jack Smith (class of 1958) and his wife, Lillian, launched the “$1 Million Challenge.” Under this program, Jack and Lillian Smith donated $500,000 to Wentworth, and pledged to donated another $500,000 if donations by alumni, family, friends, and supporters increased by ten percent. All donations were to be awarded to dedicated students in need of financial assistance. Wentworth also introduced its “Train the Trainer” program, which taught project management and construction management skills to Haitian professionals seeking to assist in Haiti’s recovery efforts.

Wentworth Chronicle       

1813 Arioch Wentworth born June 13, died March 12, 1903

1904 Corporation chartered establishing Wentworth Institute on April 5th

1904-1915 John Davis Long served as first President of the Board of Trustees

1908 Trustees purchased two parcels of land at corner of Huntington Ave. & Ruggles St.

1911-1923 Arthur L. Williston served as first Principal of Wentworth Institute

1911 First day of classes September 25 (244 students)

1916-1922 George Wigglesworth served as President of the Board of Trustees

1922-1940 Judge James M. Morton, Jr., served as Chairman of the Board of Trustees

1924-1952 Frederick E. Dobbs served as Principal of Wentworth Institute

1927 Auditorium erected (Watson Hall)

1940-1952 Franklin W. Hobbs served as Chairman of the Board of Trustees

1952-1953 Marshal N. Arlin (acting Principal)

1952-1970 Sinclair Weeks served as Chairman of the Board of Trustees

1953-1971 Dr. H. Russell Beatty served as President of Wentworth Institute

1955 Gordon College property purchased (Tudbury Hall)

1956 Charter amended to confer the junior college degree of associate in engineering

1957 Roxbury Buick property purchased (Mickelson Hall)

1957 First associate in engineering degrees awarded

1958 Plainville, Massachusetts campus acquired

1959 First associate in applied science degrees awarded

1962 Nuclear building dedicated (Willson Hall)

1966 Acquired 572-574 Huntington Avenue (Edwards & Rodgers Hall) in May

1966 Acquired 551-555 Huntington Avenue (Collins Building) in June

1966 Howard Johnson property purchased (Baker Hall) in December

1967 22-26 Evans Way purchased

1967 Beatty Hall dedicated

1970 Wentworth College of Technology founded

1970-1976 John F. Rich served as Chairman of the Board of Trustees

1970 Tansey Gymnasium and Nelson Recreation Center dedicated

1971-1990 Dr. Edward T. Kirkpatrick served as President of Wentworth Institute

1972 Dr. Edward T. Kirkpatrick appointed President of Wentworth College of Technology

1972 Wentworth becomes coeducational

1972 First bachelor of science in engineering technology degrees awarded

1975 Cooperative Education program started at Wentworth College of Technology

1976-1981 Sinclair Weeks, Jr. served as Chairman of the Board of Trustees

1977 Wentworth Institute merges with Wentworth College of Technology to form Wentworth Institute of Technology

1980 Ira Allen School purchased

1981-1985 A. Wentworth Erickson, Jr. served as Chairman of the Board of Trustees

1983 Boston Trade High School purchased

1984 Charter amended to include granting of science, engineering and technology degrees

1984 Land on Parker Street purchased

1985-1992 John R. Ghublikian served as Chairman of the Board of Trustees

1986 East Coast Aero Technical School, Inc. acquired

1986 Sylvania Technical School, Inc. received as a gift from GTE

1987 Wentworth Technical Schools incorporated with Walter C. Anderson as president

1988 $15,000,000 Student Housing renovation and extension to Evans Way & Tudbury Halls

1990 Dr. John F. Van Domelen succeeds Dr. Edward T. Kirkpatrick as president

of Wentworth Institute of Technology and Wentworth Technical Schools

1991 Purchase of the ComTech building in Concord, MA

1991 Major renovation of the Ira Allen School for physics classrooms, laboratories,

and faculty offices

1991 Major renovation of the Boston Trade High School to provide design space for the Architecture program

1992-2000 Robert W. Boyden, MC&TD'52, served as Chairman of the Board of Trustees,

the first Wentworth alumnus to serve in this capacity

1996 Completion and dedication of the Myles Elliot and Eugenia Louise Sweeney Field

1996 East Coast Aero Technical School, Inc. sold

1996 Wentworth Technical Schools, Inc., gifted to Wentworth as Sylvania Technical School,

Inc. in 1986 by GTE, closed and ceased to function as an entity

1996 Colleges of the Fenway Consortium (COF) established with Emmanuel, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Science, Simmons, and Wheelock

1998 ComTech building, Concord, Massachusetts, sold

1999 Plainville, Massachusetts, campus sold

1999 Major renovation of Williston Hall classrooms into administrative space

1999 Major renovation of Wentworth Hall second and third floors into modern classrooms

and seminar rooms

2000 William N. Whelan, EEP'63, elected as Chairman of the Board of Trustees

2000 Following renovations, Student Service Center established, collocating the offices of Financial Aid, Registrar and Student Financial Services on the first floor of Williston Hall

2000 Mickelson Hall razed for a new residence hall

2001 For the first time in the Institute’s history residents outnumber commuters. Wentworth becomes a Residential Campus

2003 Wentworth’s community service and learning program established, known as the Wentworth Center for Community and Learning Partnerships.

2004 Wentworth celebrated its Centennial Anniversary

2004 Collins Building and College Science Building razed for a new residence hall

2005 Dr. John F. Van Domelen announced his retirement

2005 Dr. Zorica Pantic appointed as the fourth, and first female, President of Wentworth. At the time of her appointment she became the only female engineer to lead an institute of technology in the United States

2005 New 373-bed residence hall at 555 Huntington Avenue was completed

2005 As part of a new technology initiative, all incoming students at Wentworth received a laptop computer

2006 President Zorica Pantic was inaugurated

2006 Wentworth’s men basketball team won the Commonwealth Coast Conference championship and a trip to the NCAA finals

2006 President Pantic represented Wentworth at international expositions for the first time, such as the one in China in July, 2006.

2006 President Pantic appointed the first-ever Strategic Planning Steering Committee (SPSC)

and charged both this group and the Long Range Planning Committee (LRPC) of the

Board of Trustees to develop a five year Strategic Plan

2006 William N. Whelan, EEP '63, stepped down as Chairman of the Board of Trustees, after six years of distinguished service (2000-2006)

2006 David W. Kruger, ’03 (Hon.), elected Chairman of the Board of Trustees, effective in September

2006 In its September meeting, the Board of Trustees ratified the 2006-2011 Strategic Plan, which became effective that October

2006 As a result of the Strategic Plan, a new Center of Teaching and Learning (CTL) was opened at Wentworth

2007 Two youth programs “Students Loving Adventures in Math” (SLAM) and “Science, Technology, Engineering and Math” (STEM) are established

2007 Wentworth responds to hurricane Katrina, first by allowing displaced by the hurricane college students to attend the Institute until their return to New Orleans, and second by sending faculty and students to New Orleans for reconstruction assistance. Wentworth’s contributions this year were estimated at $100,000

2007 The Annex is undergoes renovations to add studios, classrooms and offices

2007 The Shawmut Conference Center is built and dedicated, a gift from Shawmut Design & Construction as a gesture of reciprocity and partnership

2007 Wentworth acquires the gas station properties on the corners of Huntington Ave. & Ward Street and Huntington Ave. & Ruggles St. and converts them to open spaces

2007 Wentworth ranked by the Princeton Review among the best in Northeast Colleges and among the top 25% in the US.

2008 In July, WIT submits proposal to NEASC for the first graduate degree offer in the history of the Institute, the Master of Architecture (MArch). In November, NEASC notifies WIT that the proposal was accepted and the Institute could proceed with plans to offer a MArch degree.

2008 Philanthropist William Flanagan, a WIT graduate and member of the corporation, makes a $10 million donation, the largest gift in the Institute’s history.

2008 The “Kosta and Maria Papoulides Quadrangle” is dedicated on the corner of Ward Street and Huntington Avenue, in recognition of a generous gift received by the named honorees.

2008 The Shawmut Conference Center is completed and dedicated.

2008 WIT submits a proposal to NEASC for its first graduate degree program, the Master of Architecture (MArch).

2009 WIT is the first technology institution selected as “Community Engagement” classification by the Carnegie Foundation.

2009 Participates in Yellow Ribbon program to fund tuition for veterans.

2009 Massachusetts Building Congress honors Wentworth as a Hall of Fame inductee

2009 On September 18th NEASC’s Commission on Institutions of Higher Learning officially accepts Wentworth’s application to offer the MArch degree.

2010 The second floor of Kingman Hall is renovated.

2010 WIT establishes the Master of Science in Construction Management (MSCM) office suite, located in the Annex South building.

2010 Former presidential candidate Ralph Nader lectures at Wentworth.

2010 Wentworth hosts the Associated Schools of Construction (ASC) 46th Annual International Conference and the American Society for Engineering Education Conference.

2010 WIT restructures its programs into four colleges: the College of Architecture, Design, and Construction Management; the College of Arts and Sciences; the College of Engineering and Technology; and the College of Professional and Continuing Education.

2010 WIT establishes the Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering Programs.

2010 Wentworth Alumnus Jack Smith and his wife, Lillian, launch the “$1 Million Challenge”



Board of Trustees

Ultimate authority for governing Wentworth Institute of Technology rests in the corporation, which delegates authority to the Board of Trustees. The Board is elected by the corporation members at their annual meeting. The Board of Trustees is organized in the traditional manner, having an elected Chairman, Vice Chairman, Secretary and Treasurer, and is supported by a ten committee structure. The 2010 Board and Corporation membership is listed as follows:



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