4 steps to understanding the ‘voices and/or images from the past’ rubric Voices from the past



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4 steps to understanding the ‘voices and/or images from the past’ rubric

Voices from the past

  1. How is a voice created in a text? (Techniques, dramatic features)

  2. What is the voice saying? (Values and meaning, what are we supposed to learn?)

  3. How does this challenge our understanding of history?

  4. How does this impact our present?

Loss is a profoundly important concept that is explored in the play. The play is staged as a ‘one woman show’ whereby a single actor is only seen on stage. The play breaks from modern conventions of stage and follows a non-linear structure. By utilizing a non-linear structure the composer is able to represent different voices from the past, ultimately highlighting the continual impact of loss of culture, beliefs and land. By utilizing a non-linear structure the composer challenges us to understand that Aboriginal voices has never been accurately present in the telling of Australian history. As a responder we are asked to listen to the perspectives of Aboriginal people, and understand how profound their sense of loss is. Recognising the continual cycle of loss and suffering, we as a society move closer to a really delivering ‘reconciliation’.

Images from the past

  1. How are images created in a text? (techniques, dramatic features)

  2. What is the image conveying (values and meaning, what are we supposed to learn?)

  3. How does this challenge our understanding of history?

  4. How does this impact our present?

Images from the past inform the present, they provide direction and a sense of purpose to the lives of Aboriginal people. In scene 8, ‘family gallery’ a collection of family photographs are projected on stage. The images that are projected on stage connection this scene with the a previous scene ‘photograph story’, whereby photographs of a deceased member of the family are taken from visible sight and stored in a suitcase. As a non-Aboriginal member of the audience we find this practice confusing as photographs are embedded in the notion of European history. It challenges the audience to understand the importance of photographs as memories of the past. By removing them from sight their memory is protected and carried on in oral history. Acknowledging that photographs are confronting for Aboriginal people is part of a deeper understanding in the way in which images of the past inform the Aboriginal identity in the present.

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