Ahs program of Studies Handbook



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AHS Program of Studies Handbook

2014—2015

Table of Contents
Topic Page

Counseling and Guidance 2

Graduation Requirements 3

Technical/College – Recommended Course & Information 4

Grading Scale 9

AHS Course Offerings

Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources 10

Business/Accounting/Publications 14

Computer Education 17

Driver’s Education 42

Engineering 19

Extended Learning Program 43

Family & Consumer Sciences 20

Human Growth & Development 21

Fine Arts (Art and Music) 22

Foreign Language (French and Spanish) 25

Industrial Technology 27

Language Arts 30

Mathematics 34

Physical Education 37

Resource/SCI Program 42

Science 38

Social Studies 40

Student Success Program 43

Other Course Offerings:

Internship 43

Work Experience 43

Kirkwood/Anamosa Programs 44

Kirkwood/Anamosa Career Edge Academies 45

Senior Year Plus Programs 44



Counseling and Guidance
The day is rapidly coming when you will be entering the job market. Most of you will spend the majority of the rest of your life on the job. The job you get and how happy you will be with it depends on your interests and preparation. The courses taken in high school should be used to explore your interest and challenge your ability. You should plan your courses with your future in mind. If you would like help in deciding which courses to take, see one of the counselors. The guidance office is a good place to go if you would like information on occupations, military, trade schools, business schools or tech schools, colleges and universities or just to try out some new ideas on someone. The counseling part of the office can help you with school or personal problems.

Student Scheduling
Students may elect to schedule for any Anamosa High School course with appropriate academic preparation and instructor permission.
Student class schedules are established through a series of steps that include student choice and consultation with parents, counselors, and teachers.
STEP 1 – Student meets with advisory teacher to review scheduling process and begin

course selection for next year.

STEP 2 – Student reviews 4-year scheduling plan with parent/guardian and completes

pre-registration form.


STEP 3 – Student returns pre-registration form to their advisory teacher with parent

signature.


STEP 4 – Student/parents are welcome to make an appointment with one of the

counselors to review choices, credits, etc.


STEP 5 – Student need to meet the deadline given to complete the pre-registration

process.
When student scheduling choices result in conflicts after the master schedule has been designed, adjustments will be made as needed.


Once arranged, these schedules are changed only for sound educational reasons.
Students may make final adjustments prior to the beginning of each term. Students who drop classes after the second day of a term will receive an “F” grade in that class for the term.
TERMINOLOGY: BLOCK: 81 minutes SEMESTER: 18 weeks

YEAR LONG: 2 semesters – 36 weeks
G

raduation Requirements


Graduation Credits: Total of 56 credits required for graduation

Specific Requirements:

# of Credits

ENGLISH - 8 credits - 2 English credits per year – English 1, Comp I & II, & Contemporary

Literature are required.

MATHEMATICS - 6 credits earned in 9-12th grade.

SCIENCE - 6 credits earned in 9-12th grade.

SOCIAL STUDIES - 6 credits in 9-12th grade: 2 from World History, 2 from US

History, plus 1 from Government and 1 from other Social Studies electives.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION - 4 credits – Required to pass four terms of PE unless

exempted for physical or religious reasons.

HUMAN GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT (HGD) – 1 credit earned from Health &

Development

COMPUTER – 1 credit of Computer Applications

ADVISORY - 1 credit – One quarter credit will be earned each year for a total of

one credit.

Students who fail required classes or are failing to meet the total number of graduation credits, MUST meet with a counselor for graduation options.
Early Graduation Requirements

Students must submit a proposal for early graduation by the third Monday of October for Board approval. The proposal shall be submitted to the Guidance Office. This proposal shall contain a completed parent consent form and a letter to the principal stating why the student wishes to graduate early.


Four-Year Plan Schedule


Freshman Student

  1. Reading Lab/English 1/English 1H

  2. Math

  3. Geology

  4. Phys. Ed.

  5. Computer Apps. 1

  6. Health & Dev.

  7. Electives

  8. Advisory

Junior Student

  1. Comp I & II/ Contemporary Lit/AP Lang & Comp

  2. Math

  3. Science

  4. U.S. History

  5. Phys. Ed.

  6. Electives

  7. Advisory


Sophomore Student

  1. English 1/Comp I/Contemporary Lit/Advanced Comp.

  2. Math

  3. Biology

  4. World History

  5. Phys. Ed.

  6. Health & Dev. (if not complete in 9th)

  7. Electives

  8. Advisory

Senior Student

  1. Comp II/ AP Lit & Comp/English electives

  2. Government

  3. Social Studies Elective

  4. Phys. Ed.

  5. Electives

  6. Advisory




*AP, PSEO, and Academy courses are available to 11th & 12th grade students.


Preparing for schooling after high school:
Colleges base their admission decisions on academic achievement, extracurricular activities, and other accomplishments while in high school. Requirements vary somewhat and the grades on your transcript, test scores (ACT or SAT), class rank, and number of high school core courses completed is essential to admission to all post secondary schools. Beginning in 2008-2009 school year, the Universities in Iowa are using the RAI score for admissions. Information about this change is below:



Preparing for Technical, 2-Year, and 4-Year Post Secondary Programs

*Information courtesy of Iowa College Access Network (ICAN)
























Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources – Electives unless noted




Do you . . .

  • like planning and directing

projects?

  • have an interest in working with animals, plants, or the environment?

  • like working in agriculture?

  • have an interest in sciences such as biotechnology or aquaculture?

  • like caring for pets, sick or

injured animals?

  • enjoy doing engineering or

mechanical tasks?

  • enjoy outdoors and studying environmental issues?

  • enjoy working with people to complete school and community service projects-volunteerism?

  • enjoy leadership activities?

  • love to travel?

  • meet new people with similar interests?

If you have answered “yes” to more than half of these questions, this path may have a career for you!


For greater understanding of your interests see your guidance counselor to do an interest inventory.


Career Personality

Type


Realistic - Doer

People in this theme are

interested in ACTION. They

enjoy activities in which they are physically involved.

* Independent *Conservative

* Practical *Hands-on

*Mechanical *Athletic

*Work outdoors *Creative

*Persistent *Systematic


Career


Opportunities

Cluster Description:

The Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Career Cluster is designed to prepare all students for college, technical training, apprenticeships and careers including striving for higher achievement in science, math and communication. This diverse

Career Cluster prepares learners for careers in the planning, implementation, production, management, processing and/or marketing of agricultural commodities and services, including food, fiber, wood products, natural resources, and other plant and animal products. It also includes related professional,

technical, and educational services.

THE OPPORTUNITIES ARE:

It’s a time of looking at options, of making choices, and looking ahead. You’re thinking about career opportunities. And you owe it to yourself to consider a career in agriculture. Employment opportunities will continue to increase for those who provide and market an expanding array of food, forest, and veterinary medical consumer products to a growing world population. Continued globalization of the food, agricultural and natural resources system will increase opportunities for graduates who understand the socio-economic factors that define international markets. Graduates who know how to satisfy the diverse consumer needs and preferences in different cultures, and who have the language skills to communicate effectively, will have the best opportunities to be employed by the growing number of multi-national businesses. Even if you don’t choose a career in the science, business and technology of agriculture, the skills and training you gain through agricultural education will lead to success in any industry.
The agricultural education program has three parts: classroom, SAE, and FFA.
Program Components

Codes: Req=Required Opt=Optional
SAE Programs

Supervised agriculture experience programs (SAE) consists of all of the planned practical activities where the student develops and applies agriculture knowledge and skills. Examples of common SAE programs include: agriscience fair projects, raising animals, working at an agribusiness, taking photographs, growing and exhibiting vegetables and flowers, growing plants, trapping and hunting, mowing lawns, starting a small business, or completing an ag. mechanics project.


FFA Activities and Events

Whether you’re planning a career in agriculture or in another field, you’ll benefit from the world of opportunities in FFA. FFA makes a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through camps, travel, service projects, competition, and scholarships

Agricultural education students are encouraged to become FFA members. Students must be enrolled in 1 term of agricultural education classes per year to remain eligible for FFA.

Yearly Class Offerings
050/051 Introduction to Agriscience

1 credit per semester Year Long

Grades 9-12 No Prerequisite

FFA Req ~SAE: Req ~Science credit

This course integrates general science and technological concepts with principles of agriculture, food and natural resources. Take a journey through all of today’s seven agricultural areas such as food products and processing systems, plant systems, animal systems, power, structural and technical systems, natural resources systems, environmental service systems, and agribusiness systems. Learn the rationale for and plan a

supervised agriculture experience program. Begin to learn basic leadership and responsibility skills. Science credit is given to students successfully completing the course.
052/053 Biology of Agriculture

1 credit per semester Year Long

Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: Intro. to Agrisci. or

Instructor Approval

FFA Req~ SAE: Req ~Science credit

This course explains the scientific principles behind the production of food and natural resources. All of modern agriculture is built on these principles, and it is through scientific inquiry that progress is made. Much of what we know about living organisms and their environments is the result of research in agriculture. Biological concepts/topics and their related technologies will be incorporated into agricultural areas such as genetics, genetic engineering, animal systems, animal reproduction, agricultural entomology, food production and preservation, and the science of fiber production. Advanced leadership skills will be learned. Course will include Parliamentary Procedure. Biology credit is given to students successfully

completing the course.

058 Agribusiness Mgt./Marketing

1 credit 1 Semester

Grade 11-12

Prerequisite: Intro. to Agriscience,

Bio. of Ag., or Instructor Approval

FFA: Opt

In this course, students will learn to apply accounting principles and economic concepts to farm and agribusiness situations. Concepts/ topics that will be learned include comparing the single and double entry accounting systems, purpose of the financial statement, cash flow statement and profit-loss statement, money and banking, credit requirements and procedures for getting an agricultural loan, financial analysis, investment analysis, marketing options, and Federal government programs and agencies.


080 Ag. Power and Technology

1 credit 1 Semester

Grade 11-12

Prerequisite: Intro. to Agriscience,

Bio. of Ag., Biology,

or Instructor Approval



FFA: Opt

In this course students will study 2-cycle and 4-cycle engine theory. Diesel engine theory and rotary engine theory will also be discussed. Take a journey through all of the engine’s systems such as the internal engine and cylinder, carburetor and fuel system, governor and linkage components, rewind starters, electrical system, flysheet brake system, and ignition system. Students will use a repair manual to determine engine specifications and properly use a variety of specialty tools to disassemble and reassemble a 4-cycle engine provided to them through community sponsor. Student needs to have a personal project.


078 Animal Agriculture

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 11 - 12

Prerequisite: Intro. to Agriscience, Bio.

of Ag., or Instructor Approval

FFA: Opt ~Science credit

Students will investigate better, more efficient ways of producing and processing meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy products. Students will study the classification of agricultural animals, genetics, behavior, nutrition, reproduction, growth and development

of domesticated farm animals. Issues such as the use of growth hormones, transgenic animals, cloning, and “fingerprinting” organisms, and animal welfare will be discussed. Scientific concepts and computer technology will be incorporated into all topics explored. Alternative animal agriculture will be investigated.

069 Basic Agricultural Mechanics

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 11 - 12

Prerequisite: Intro. to Agriscience,

Bio. of Ag., or Instructor Approval

FFA: Opt

This course is for beginners. Students will explore the role of mechanics in the world of agriculture, identify career options in agricultural mechanics, and investigate shop procedures and personal safety. Students will operate hand woodworking tools as well as power tools needed to build a project of their choice. Students will practice basic sketching and drawing skills and

figure a bill of materials. The principles of arc welding mild steel, using gas welding equipment, installing electrical branch circuits, and constructing simple plumbing systems will be studied.
061 Construction Engineering

1 credit 1 Semester

Grade 11-12

Prerequisite: Intro. to Agriscience,

Bio. of Ag., Basic Ag. Mechanics,

or Instructor Approval



FFA: Opt

This course addresses structural systems used in agriculture. Students gain understanding in structural design, engineering, materials, and selection. Discussions address appropriate considerations for site planning, identify major types of buildings used in agricultural settings, name major building parts, and describe special features used to make buildings waterproof and wind resistant. Hands-on experience is gained through the construction of a project.



4 Food Science and Technology

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 10 - 12

Prerequisite: Intro. to Agriscience or

Foods or Instructor Approval

FFA: Opt ~Science credit

This course is for students who want to work in the food products and processing pathway of agriculture. Students will learn to investigate new food sources, analyze food content, and discuss ways to process, preserve, package or store food according to industry and government regulations.

Students will study the issue of inspecting food processing areas to ensure that sanitation, safety, quality and waste management standards are met. Marketing and advertising of food products will be included. Students will create a new food product.
072 Horticulture (Floriculture)

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 11 - 12

Prerequisite: Intro. to Agriscience, Bio.

of Ag., or Instructor Approval

FFA: Opt ~Science credit

This course is for those students who love houseplants and flowers. Students will be able to identify common houseplants, cut flowers, bulbs, annual bedding plants and perennials. Students will study the environmental requirements required for good plant growth, investigate the role of growth stimulants, retardants, and rooting hormones, and complete propagation techniques commonly used in the horticulture industry. Students will treat unhealthy plants due to pests, nutritional, mechanical, or chemical injury. Students will practice what they have learned in the classroom by starting and caring for the bedding plants in the department’s greenhouse.


063 Introduction to Agribusiness

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 11 - 12

Prerequisite: Intro. to Agriscience.,

Bio. of Ag., or Instructor Approval

FFA: Opt

This course will introduce students to the role of agribusinesses, which is the coordination of all activities that contribute to the production, processing, marketing, distribution, financing and development of agricultural commodities and resources.

Business organizations, marketing concepts, sales techniques, customer relations considerations, satellite systems and computer databases and spreadsheets will be studied.

067 Landscape/Nursery

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 11 - 12

Prerequisite: Intro. to Agrisci., Bio. of

Ag., or Instructor Approval

FFA: Opt

This course is for those students who love plant materials used in landscaping residential homes, schools, government buildings and businesses. Students will be able to identify ornamental grasses, vines, ground covers, shrubs and trees commonly used in Iowa landscaping situations. Students will study and environmental requirements needed for good plant establishment and growth. Computer technology will be used to make several landscape plans using the principles of landscaping. Establishing,

maintaining and renovating lawns will also be studied. Student will practice what they have learned by landscaping the Building Trades project house.

079 Small Animals and Pets

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 11 - 12

Prerequisite: Intro. to Agrisci., Bio. of

Ag., or Instructor Approval

FFA: Opt ~ Science credit

This course is for students who love small animals and pets. The course is intended to prepare students for college, technical training, apprenticeships and careers related to small animals and pets. Students interested in zoology and marine biology may also want to take this course. Students will study the production, management and care of companion animals and pets such as dogs, cats, rabbits, hamsters, ferrets, tropical fish, reptiles, amphibians, and exotic birds.


066 Vet Technology

1 credit 1 Semester

Grade 11-12

Prerequisite: Intro. to Agriscience,

Bio. of Ag., Biology,

or Instructor Approval



FFA: Opt Science Credit

This course is intended to prepare students for college, technical training, apprenticeships, and careers related to health and care of domesticated farm animals, companion animals, and small pets. Students interested in zoology and marine biology may also want to take this course. Cell biology and animal anatomy and physiology concepts/topics will be studied in depth. Common ailments and ideas will also be investigated. Case studies will be used to help student develop problem-solving skills.




Class Rotation Offerings
078 Animal Agriculture

064 Food Science and Technology

063 Introduction to Agribusiness

058 Agribusiness Mgt./Marketing

080 Ag. Power and Technology 061 Construction Engineering

066 Vet Technology


081 Survey of the Animal Industry

(Part of the Kirkwood Agriculture Science Academy-3 college credits awarded after successful completion)

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: Intro to Ag & Bio of Ag or Instructor Approval.

Introduction to the uses of animals and animal products. Basic terminology, production practices, management and marketing of animals. Survey of the Animal Industry is a Kirkwood Community College Academy course. Students will be registered through Kirkwood and receive three college credits.



082 Percision Farming Systems

(Part of the Kirkwood Agriculture Science Academy-3 college credits awarded after successful completion)

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: Intro to Ag & Bio of Ag or Instructor Approval.

This course provides an overview of precision farming concepts and the tools of precision farming (GPS, GIS and VRT). Introductory use of each of these tools in the processes of a precision farming systems are covered. Hands-on activities with local data will provide an initial experience in the use of these tools. Economic and environmental benefits are also discussed. Percision Farming Systems is a Kirkwood Community College Academy course. Students will be registered through Kirkwood and receive three college credits.



083 Principles of Agronamy

(Part of the Kirkwood Agriculture Science Academy-3 college credits awarded after successful completion)

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: Intro to Ag & Bio of Ag

or Instructor Approval.

This course presents instruction in crop plant classification, use and identification. It also covers cropping systems, tillage methods, planting and harvesting methods and crop growth patterns. It is a balance of theoretical and practical crop science. Principles of Agronamy is a Kirkwood Community College Academy course. Students will be registered through Kirkwood and receive three college credits.




D
Business Education – Elective credits unless noted
o you . . .

  • enjoy working with computers?

  • enjoy organizing and planning?

  • enjoy leadership roles and making

decisions?

  • have clear verbal and written

communication skills?

  • enjoy working as part of a team?

  • have the ability to work under

pressure?

  • have good problem-solving skills?

  • want to develop the skills needed to succeed in the 21st Century?

If you have answered “yes” to more than half of these questions, this path may have a career for you!


For greater understanding of your interests see your

guidance counselor to do an interest inventory.




Career Personality

Type


Investigative/Thinker

Conventional/Organizer

Realistic/Doer

People in this theme work in organizations.

They especially like activities

that require attention

to detail and accuracy.

*Organized * Responsible

*Accurate * Efficient

*Personable * Innovative

*Problem-Solver *Systemic *Mathematical *Logical

*Creative *Persistent *PersistentMathematical * Logical

*Creative * Persistent

Career


Opportunities

Cluster Description:

Right now almost one-third of the workforce in the United States is employed in administration, business, and office work. Each sector of the economy both wholesale and retail trade require expertise and post-high school training in business.

Career plans could include, but are not limited to, sales, administrative support, entrepreneurship, computing and data processing, transcribing, finance, and business management. Education and specialized training in the field of business is more important than ever. Technical college or university education is essential for higher level business jobs. At almost every level computer training will be needed. Education will not end with employment; expect to expand your knowledge and skills base.

Computer scientists and system analysts are among the fastest growing occupations.

In addition, tens of thousands of job openings will result annually from the need to replace workers who move into managerial positions or other occupations or leave the labor force. The demand for computer scientists and engineers is expected to rise as organizations attempt to maximize the efficiency of their computer systems. As inter-national and domestic competition increases, organ-izations will face growing pressure to use technological advances in areas such as office and factory automation, tele-communications, and scientific research. More computer scientists will be needed to develop innovative and increasingly sophisticated

systems.

Yearly Class Offerings
150 Introduction to Business

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: None

This introductory class allows students to explore basic business concepts and structures in a fast-paced competitive team environment. Through project based activities and computer simulations students will gain experience in management leadership, project planning, human resources, and financial management while learning about the business world. Topics include business structure, ethics, consumer rights and responsibilities, entrepreneurship, small business ownership and the relationship of business with economics, government, and the global economy.
151 Entrepreneurship

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: Business Management

This course is a continuation of the concepts introduced in Introduction to Business. Using student driven research and real-world business activities students will focus on entrepreneurship and small business ownership. They will use computer based simulations to enhance their understanding of business ownership and operations, organizational structures, and strategic planning. As a final project, students will get the opportunity to write a business plan for a startup business.

155/156 Accounting

2 credits Year Long

Grades 11- 12

Prerequisite: None

This course gives students a thorough background in the basic accounting procedures used to operate a business and also prepares them for college accounting classes, which are required of all business majors. Students will learn the accounting cycle and use double-entry accounting for a variety of business organizations, including proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations. Students will prepare monthly journals, ledgers, payrolls, and worksheets as well as end-of-fiscal-period financial statements. Both manual and automated accounting procedures are covered. Several projects and business simulations are used during the course to add realism and to give the students practical experience during both terms. Accounting is designed to prepare students for employment in business, provide a background for personal recordkeeping, and create a knowledge base for advanced accounting study in college. This course can be articulated into credit at Kirkwood Community College if students meet competency requirements.
155/156 Accounting II – Independent Study

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 11- 12

Prerequisite: Instructor Approval, must have achieved at least a B grade in Accounting

This course is a continuation of the semester Accounting course and will deal with Cycle 3 Accounting, double entry accounting concepts for a corporation as further preparation for college accounting.

Coursework is setup to be completed as an independent study and requires instructor approval. Students can take the course anytime if arranged in advance with the instructor.




159 Career Pathways

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: None

What do you want to do with your life? What do you dream of becoming? What are you good at? What do you enjoy? Career Pathways will help you explore the answers to these questions. First you will take a look at who you are through self-assessment to determine your interest, values, preferred life-style, etc. Next you will explore different career areas and attempt to develop some career choice options. We will review skills and characteristics needed to succeed in a career. You will investigate what to expect when living on your own, how to manage money, how to make wise decisions, and what it means to meet adult responsibilities. Students taking this course will have the opportunity to hear from guest speakers from a wide variety of different careers. The students will also use Virtual Personal Finance software to learn about different situations they will encounter after high school. Finally, we will focus on the importance of lifelong learning. This course is designed to help students plan and set goals for a future career.

147 Foundations of Marketing

1 credits 1 Semester

Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: None

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the scope, terminology and functions of marketing in the modern business firm within our global economy. Students will focus on understanding and analyzing consumer motivation and how to use that understanding to develop a successful marketing campaign. Students will participate in real-world project-based learning and technology to gain a deeper understanding of marketing and develop 21st Century Skills in the areas of technology, creativity, innovation, collaboration, problem-solving, and communications skills. Students will develop an idea for a new cereal, design a cereal package, and develop a marketing plan to introduce it.
149 Retail Marketing Concepts

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: None (Preference is to take Foundations of Marketing first)

The purpose of this level 2 marketing course is for students to apply the principles of product, price, place, and promotion to retail business operations. Students will visit local retail operations, conduct a marketing and operations analysis, and develop an improvement plan to increase sales and customer satisfaction. Students will learn through the use of project-based activities, case studies, and field studies. Students will use a Virtual Retailing computer simulation to operate a convenience store and make decisions related to market surveys, location selection, pricing, staffing, merchandising, promotions, etc. Students will analyze financials and make business decisions to increase market share, revenue, and profits. Focus will be on 21 Century Skills development.
386/387 Teen Leadership

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 10-12

In this class, students develop leadership, personal, and business skills. They learn to develop an understanding of Emotional Intelligence and the skills it measures, which include self-awareness, self-control, self-motivation, and social skills. Students will develop skills in public speaking and communication and an understanding of personal image. They will develop an understanding of the concept of principle-based decision-making and develop their own personal mission statement. They will develop an understanding of the effects of peer pressure and will develop skills to counteract those effects. They will develop an understanding of the principles of parenting, enabling them to become better family members and citizens. They will also develop an understanding of the need for vision in goal-setting, personally and professionally.



Course Number 160 AHS Yearbook/News Publications

(Can be taken both semester 1 and 2)
1 Credit per Semester

Grades 9 - 12

Prerequisite: Instructor Approval
Each year a staff of high school students create the Raider Yearbook and monthly issues of the A-town Low-down (school newspaper); as well as additional miscellaneous publications for the high school.
AHS Yearbook/News Publications operates as a student run business organization, using business systems, and processes to create quality products, operate within a budget and develop team members’ future career success skills. Staff positions include, Editor-in-Chief, Business/Advertising Manager, Layout Design Editors, Photo Editors, Copy Editors, Section Editors, Web Master, Advertising Editor, Journalist, and Photographer.
In AHS Yearbook/News Publications a strong emphasis will be placed on developing leadership, technology, creativity and the skills needed to succeed in the 21st Century. Technology used in productions and design includes Photoshop, In Design, Publisher, Word, Google docs, online design software, and video editing software.
AHS Yearbook/News Publications needs students who are responsible, organized, problem-solvers, team players, committed, and that can meet deadlines. If you think you meet these criteria, please see the AHS Yearbook/News Publications adviser for information on how to apply.


Computer Courses – Required and elective credits




130 Computer Applications

1 credit 1 Semester REQUIRED

Grade 9-12

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to allow students to become more familiar with the computer and technology within our school and increase their abilities in typing speed and accuracy. Students will be introduced to cloud based computing using Google products. They will be proficient in creating and using Docs, Spreadsheets, Forms, Presentations and G-mail. Students will also be instructed on proper business letter formatting, using Excel to organize information and analyze data, creating multi-media presentations, and creating professional publications using Publisher. Another component of this course includes financial literacy learning modules and simulations. Development of 21st Century skills will benefit students in post secondary education and future careers.
164 Desktop Publishing

(Part of the Kirkwood Information Systems Management Academy-3 college credits awarded after successful completion)

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: Comp. Appl.

This course allows students to create professional-quality documents, such as one-page bulletins for short newsletters, using desktop publishing software. The students will also integrate text, graphic and image files previously created with a variety of application software. A few multimedia tools (digital camera and scanner) will be utilized. Desktop Publishing is a Kirkwood Community College Information Systems Management Academy course and students will receive three college credits and will be registered through Kirkwood.
169 Computer Programming

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: Comp. Appl. 1

Students will learn basic computer programming language and skills using Scratch, MS LOGO, Blender, and Game Maker Pro and other programming software. These skills are intended to help a student gain a base knowledge, and will not fully prepare students for a computer programming job, but will set a foundation for future education for those deciding to go into the programming field. Students will use self-directed learning, collaboration, and instructor guidance to complete a variety of programming projects, including simple computer games. Students will have the opportunity through this course to explore whether there is an interest or aptitude to pursue computer programming as a potential career. This course will include various elements of computer programming career exploration. Students will further develop 21st Century Skills needed for future personal & career success.


148 Fundamentals of Web Programming

(Part of the Kirkwood Information Systems Management Academy-3 college credits awarded after successful completion)

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: Comp. Appl. 1

Must have strong computer skills – 95% of class time is working on a computer. In this college credit course students will learn the basics of writing Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) to create Web pages that include graphics, links, tables, frames, forms and styles. Students will also learn the basics of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), JavaScript, and Dynamic HTML on an introductory level. Using project-based learning in the lab students will create Web pages and develop a Web site that includes text, tables, graphics, and Web forms. Fundamentals of Web Programming is a Kirkwood Community College Academy course. Students will be registered through Kirkwood and receive three college credits.

170 PowerPoint/Multimedia

(Part of the Kirkwood Software Specialist Academy-3 college credits awarded after successful completion)

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: Comp. Appl.

Improving communication skills by using multimedia technology is the goal of the class.

Multimedia technology means different things to different people. It can be a communications

tool, a teaching tool, a sales tool, or an artistic medium. Multimedia technology is a tool--not

an end in itself.

Students will move through the basics of PowerPoint and then add advanced features. Students will learn and use basic design strategy for presentations. Students will use clip art, download graphics from the Internet, edit graphics, and use photo editing software. Students will learn to capture and edit sound using a music mixing and editing software. Students will capture and edit video files. Students will use these newly learned skills to create movies using a video creation and editing software.

Students will be registered through Kirkwood Community College.


171 Digital Layout

(Part of the Kirkwood Graphics and Media Communication Specialist Academy-3 college credits awarded after successful completion)

1 HS Credit 3 College Credits

1 Semester

Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: Comp. Appl.

This Course provides working knowledge of the CS6 Adobe InDesign page layout program and its use in creating effective page layouts combining graphics and type. Students will develop skills in all aspects of InDesign software usage, general layout and design concepts. Importing graphics, columns and grids, visual appeal, and exporting for publishing. Students create various single and spot color layouts, including flyers, newsletters, newspaper and magazine layouts, and other professional printed materials.




Engineering Courses

Do you . . .



  • enjoy seeing how?

  • enjoy building or repairing?

  • enjoy designing and then creating your design?

  • enjoy working with computers?

  • enjoy math?

  • enjoy planning and laying-out a project?

  • enjoy being a team player?

If you have answered “yes” to more than half of these questions, this path may have a career for you!


For greater understanding of your interests see your guidance counselor to do an interest inventory.


Career Personality

Type


Realistic/Doer

Investigative/Thinker
People in this theme are a

combination of personality types. These people are interested in action. They enjoy activities which they are physically involved. They also have a strong scientific interest and are always asking the

questions “Why and How”.
* Logical *Mechanical

* Inquisitive *Persistant

* Scientific *Hands-On

* Curious *Systemic

* Independent *Ambitious




Career

Opportunities

Cluster Description:

Engineers have strong math and strong science skills. They typically work in one or more areas such as research, development, design, production, consulting, administration and management, teaching, technical, technical writing, or technical sales and service. Specific areas of Engineering may include:


Aerospace

Agricultural

Biological Systems

Chemical


Civil

Computer


Construction

Electrical

Industrial

Marine


Mechanical

Mining


Nuclear

Petroleum

Software

Structural

AHS Courses – Engineering

RECOMMENDED SCIENCE

COURSES

Principles of Technology

Physics

Chemistry


RECOMMENDED MATH

COURSES

Algebra 1

Algebra 2

Geometry


Pre-Calculus

Intro. to Statistics

Calculus
RECOMMENDED

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

COURSES

Drafting


Project Lead the Way

Principles of Technology


Project Lead the Way (PLTW) is a nationally-recognized pre-engineering curriculum designed to help students develop better problem solving skills by immersing them in real-world engineering challenges. The courses all use project-based, hands-on experiences to teach students the key elements and skills of engineering and technology-based careers.
PLTW is available as a Career Academy at the Kirkwood Learning Center and includes Introduction to Engineering & Principals of Engineering. Course descriptions on page 27.


Family and Consumer Sciences – 1 Human Growth & Development

Course (HGD) Required & Electives




Career Personality

Type


Social/Helper

People in this theme enjoy

working with PEOPLE. They

like to solve problems through

discussions of feelings and

interactions with others.
* Friendly *Outgoing

*Helpful *Understanding

* Idealistic * Cooperative

* Insightful * Patient

*Generous * Kind




Do you . . .

  • enjoy organizing and planning?

  • enjoy helping others?

  • enjoy preparing food?

  • enjoy working with young

  • children?

  • enjoy listening to others?

  • see yourself as being very patient with others?

  • have good critical thinking skills?

  • want to improve family relationships?

If you have answered “yes” to more than half of these questions, this path may have a career for you!


For greater understanding of your interests see your guidance counselor to do an interest inventory.

Career


Opportunities

Cluster Description:

These courses help all persons make knowledgeable decisions affecting the family, such as proper nutrition, food preparation, child development, and family relationship skills.

These thinking skills are essential for all and will affect their citizen life, job life, and their own family life.


Students should take Family and Consumer Education classes if interested in jobs related to:

- day care

- family therapy

- food service

- dietician

- retail/fashion merchandising

- pediatrics

Other related courses:

- social use

- sociology

- biology

- chemistry



Class Offerings
248 Explore F.C.S.(Explore Family & Consumer Sciences)

1 Credit 1 Semester

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: None

This is an introductory course for any student to take in the area of Family & Consumer Sciences. The course includes units on Goals, Careers, Relationships, Money Management, Clothing Care, Foods and Nutrition. Many activities, projects, and labs will be included in this course.
254 Child Development 1

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: None

Students will study the emotional, social, physical, and intellectual development of children. The course includes units on the study of children, development the first year through age six, development through arts and crafts and cooking with kids. This course will provide useful information for anyone who plans to be a mother, father, or caretaker of children
255 Child Development 2

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: Child Dev. 1

This course covers four units: careers in child development, health and safety, family challenges, and childcare settings. Students will create their own preschool and a variety of lessons based around a theme. Students will also spend multiple days working with preschool, kindergarten, or first grade students at Strawberry Hill Elemetary

.
250 Foods

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: None

This course has been designed to help students understand basic food preparation, terminology, and equipment. Students will complete units on kitchen safety, measuring, cookies, quick breads, yeast breads, eggs, fruits and ground beef.


252 Creative Foods (Foods 2)

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: Foods

This advanced foods course will take a deeper look into the culinary field. Students will study different types of careers in the food service industry along with experimenting with a variety of cooking methods. Other units include: types of chefs, knife skills, garnishes, soups, casseroles, pies, cake decorating and cultural foods.
253 Regional and International Foods (Foods 3)

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: Foods & Creative Foods

This course will take a look at foods across the United States along with International Cuisines. We will take our basic knowledge about spices and cooking techniques from Creative Foods one step further. This is a great course for anyone planning on entering the Culinary Arts field.
261 Fashion

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: None

This course will cover information on various types of fabrics, hand stitching techniques, parts of a sewing machine and clothing care. We will also take a look into types of clothing, fashion history and fashion trends. Multiple fashion designers and their clothing or shoe lines will be studied. Careers in the retail and fashion merchandising will also be examined.
262 Fashion 2

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: Fashion

In this course we will look into the merchandising side of fashion. Clothing and accessory lines will be created and marketing techniques will be examined.
256 Family Relations

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: None

The course is designed for the student who wishes to better understand himself, his family, and his role in society. The units covered will be: healthy vs. unhealthy relationships, family relationships, dating/marriage, and workplace relationships. This class will participate in service projects and will invite local guest speakers in to present on what their organizations has to offer to help families.
259 Interior Design

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to make the student aware of available forms of housing: buying vs. renting; architectural styles; lighting; household repairs; interior design evaluation of floor plans, furniture selection, arrangement, and refinishing; selection of major household appliances; and career opportunities. Projects include designing and furnishing a home using interior design skills and computer aided design.

257 Parenting

1 credit 1 Semester

Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: None




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