Ap computer Science Principles Syllabus Teacher Contact Information



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2015- 2016

AP Computer Science Principles

Syllabus

Teacher Contact Information:

Mr. Schmidt

Email: gjschmidt@cps.edu

Phone: 773-535-2410 x25375


Course Description:

Computer Science Principles (CSP) curriculum is a course designed around the AP Computer Science Principles Framework. It becomes an official AP® course in the 2016-17 school year. CS Principles is designed to be a full-year, rigorous, but entry-level course for high school students. The course contains four core units of study, with a fifth unit devoted almost exclusively to students working on their AP Performance Task (PT) projects:



Unit 1: The Digital Representation of Information

This unit sets the foundation for thinking about the digital (binary) representation of information and how that affects the world we live in. This unit explores the technical challenges and questions that arise from the need to represent digital information in computers and transfer it between people and computational devices. Topics include: the digital representation of information - numbers, text, images, and communication protocols.



Unit 2: The Internet

This unit largely explores the structure and design of the Internet and the implications of those design decisions including the reliability of network communication, the security of data, and personal privacy. Topics include the Internet Protocol (IP), DNS, TCP/IP, cryptography and other security and hacking concerns. The unit also makes the link between the existence of computationally hard problems and encryption schemes that are “hard” for computers to crack.



Unit 3: Programming

This unit introduces students to programming in the JavaScript language and creating small applications (apps) that live on the web. This introduction places a heavy emphasis on understanding general principles of computer programming and revealing those things that are universally applicable to any programming language. Students will program in an online programming environment called App Lab that has many features, chief among them the ability to write JavaScript programs with click-and-drag blocks or just typing text - allowing the user to switch back and forth at will.



Unit 4: Data

In this unit students continue programming and building apps, but now with a heavier focus on data. Being able to extract knowledge from data is an important aspect of CS Principles and in this unit students will do that in a number of ways. Students will write programs that generate data to model or simulate a scenario they wish to investigate. Students will process large lists of data imported from other sources and also pull data from live data APIs. Students will also more fully use App Lab’s cloud data storage capabilities to create databases to use with their own apps.



Unit 5 - Performance Tasks

This unit is primarily set aside to ensure that students have enough time in class to work on and complete their performance tasks for submission.



Course Objectives:

The course is based on Computational Thinking Practices (CTP). Computational thinking practices capture important aspects of the work that computer scientists engage in. These practices are essential to the experience of doing work in computing. These practices are not something that one covers once and then is done. Rather they represent higher order thinking skills, behaviors, and habits of mind that need to be constantly visited, repeatedly honed, and refined over time. Here are the Computational Thinking Practices as define by the College Board:



P1: Connecting Computing

  1. Identify impacts of computing.

  2. Describe connections between people and computing.

  3. Explain connections between computing concepts.

P2: Creating Computational Artifacts

  1. Create an artifact with a practical, personal, or societal intent.

  2. Select appropriate techniques to develop a computational artifact.

  3. Use appropriate algorithmic and information management principles.

P3: Abstracting

  1. Explain how data, information, or knowledge is represented for computational use.

  2. Explain how abstractions are used in computation or modeling.

  3. Identify abstractions.

  4. Describe modeling in a computational context.

P4: Analyzing Problems and Artifacts

  1. Evaluate a proposed solution to a problem.

  2. Locate and correct errors.

  3. Explain how an artifact functions.

  4. Justify appropriateness and correctness of a solution, model, or artifact.

P5: Communicating

  1. Explain the meaning of a result in context.

  2. Describe computation with accurate and precise language, notations, or visualizations

  3. Summarize the purpose of a computational artifact.

P6: Collaborating

  1. Collaborate with another student in solving a computational problem.

  2. Collaborate with another student in producing an artifact.

  3. Share the workload by providing individual contributions to an overall collaborative effort.

  4. Foster a constructive, collaborative climate by resolving conflicts and facilitating the contributions of a team member

  5. Exchange knowledge and feedback with a partner or team member.

  6. Review and revise their work as needed to create a high-quality artifact.


Required Materials:

Most of the class will be completed online at Code Studio (http://code.org/studio). The only materials required for the class are:



  1. Composition Notebook

  2. Pencil/Pen


Course Materials:

Most materials for the class will be found at Code Studio (http://code.org/studio ). Other materials for this class will be available on the Hancock web site (http://hancockhs.org). Under the button Academics, select Classes and Curriculum. Next select the Computer Department and then the AP CSP class. Click on See Homework and select the homework for that day. The presentation, homework and any files you need to complete that homework will be stored there.



Grading Policy:

The standard grading scale is used for this course:

A 90-100%

B 80-89%


C 70-79%

D 60-69%


F 0-59%
Grades are divided into the following categories:

Homework 50%

Projects 40%

Other 10%

All assignments are expected to be turned in on time. Given the nature of the class, ample time is given during class to complete all assignments. Not doing classwork will hurt your grade. Late work incurs a penalty:


  • Three days late – 75% of possible total points

  • One week late – Work is not accepted.

You are responsible for your grade. Check your grade in Gradebook often to see if you are missing anything.


Classroom Rules and Procedures:

  1. Tardy Log: You are expected to be in your seat, ready to work when the bell rings. If you come in after the bell you must sign the Tardy Log.



  1. Phones/iPods/Earbuds: Keep them put away. No warnings. If they are out your parents will be picking them up from the Dean. You may not charge your electronics in this class. Earbuds will not be hanging from your shirt.



  1. No Food or Drink: PCs do not react well to spills on/in them and eating messes up the keyboards and mice. You may have water in water bottle with a screw on top.



  1. Homework: Homework that is due should be placed in the “Homework In” folder on the shelves. The left hand bins are for homework “in” and the right hand bins are for homework that I have graded. Please pick up your graded homework




  1. Stay on Task: If you don’t understand what you should be doing ASK. Don’t just sit there and don’t play games/surf the internet.



  1. Seating: Sit in your assigned seat. I take attendance by seat and your work is stored on that PC.



  1. Absences: Past lessons and homework are available on the Hancock website. If you were absent please pick up what you missed there. It’s your responsibility to get the work you missed. You have the same number of to make up work as the number of days you were absent. This applies only to “excused” absences.



  1. Uniforms, IDs, etc: All school rules apply in the classroom. That includes wearing the appropriate uniform and having your ID around your neck.

Activity: Lecture/Presentation
Conversation: VL-0 - None, unless called on or questioning.
Help: Raise hand & wait to be called on. Ask questions on anything you don’t understand.
Integrity: Stay on Task! Don’t play games/surf the net.
Effort: Sit up! Act interested! Keep eyes on presenter, screen, board or handout!
Value: Lecture content will help you understand & complete the homework. Notes will help you study for quizzes & tests.
Efficiency: Follow along. Remain quiet. Listen actively – what’s being lectured on will be used in the immediately following homework!

Activity: Independent Work

Conversation: VL-2 - Students can talk to get help on work…IF they’re near each other…IF they speak quietly…IF it’s not more than 3 people…IF it’s no more than a couple minutes.

Help: Ask another student OR raise your hand BUT keep working on other parts of the task.

Integrity: Do your own work. Ask a few questions.

Effort: Reading. Typing. Doing. Briefly asking or answering a question. NOT sleeping! NOT idling! NOT having a long, gossip-filled conversation! NOT working on other classwork before the assigned task is finished!

Value: Working independently gives you the power to take ownership of your own learning at your own pace. Earn points.

Efficiency: Avoid distractions. Concentrate & get the work done faster.

Activity: Group Work

Conversation: VL-2 - Students talk quietly to get the project done

Help: Raise hand. Continue with other parts of the work until teacher arrives.

Integrity: Everyone participates.

Effort: Each student is expected to:

Stay on task

Accurately complete the assignment on time as a team.
Value: Group works allows you to collaborate with others and value different perspectives
Efficiency: Avoid distractions. Concentrate & get the work done faster. Everyone does their part of the work.
2015- 2016 - AP Computer Science Principles

Parent Information

Teacher Contact Information:

Mr. Schmidt

Email: gjschmidt@cps.edu

Phone: 773-535-2410 x25375


Course Description: Computer Science Principles (CSP) curriculum is a course designed around the AP Computer Science Principles Framework. It becomes an official AP® course in the 2016-17 school year. There will not be an AP exam this year. CS Principles is designed to be a full-year, rigorous, but entry-level course for high school students. The course contains four core units of study, with a fifth unit devoted almost exclusively to students working on their AP Performance Task (PT) projects. The units are: Unit 1: The Digital Representation of Information, Unit 2: The Internet, Unit 3: Programming, Unit 4: Data, and Unit 5 - Performance Tasks.

Course Objectives: The course is based on Computational Thinking Practices (CTP). Computational thinking practices capture important aspects of the work that computer scientists engage in. These practices are essential to the experience of doing work in computing. These practices are not something that one covers once and then is done. Rather they represent higher order thinking skills, behaviors, and habits of mind that need to be constantly visited, repeatedly honed, and refined over time. Here are the Computational Thinking Practices as define by the College Board: P1: Connecting Computing, P2: Creating Computational Artifacts, P3: Abstracting, P4: Analyzing Problems and Artifacts, P5: Communicating, and P6: Collaborating

Required Materials: Most of the class will be completed online at Code Studio (http://code.org/studio). The only materials required for the class are a composition notebook and a pen/pencil.

Grading Policy: The standard grading scale is used for this course:

A 90-100%

B 80-89%

C 70-79%


D 60-69%

F 0-59%


All assignments are expected to be turned in on time. Given the nature of the class, ample time is given during class to complete all assignments. Not doing classwork will hurt your grade. Late work incurs a penalty:

  • Three days late – 75% of possible total points

  • One week late – Work is not accepted.


2015- 2016 - AP Computer Science Principles

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