Ap us history Syllabus Instructor: James Diehl Room: 133 Course



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AP - US History Syllabus

Instructor: James Diehl Room: 133

Course: AP - US History Email: jadiehl01@irvingisd.net

Office Hours: Conference – 7th period Phone: 972-600-5700

Tutoring – before school



The Class

The AP U.S. History course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials – their relevance to a given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance – and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship.


There are four main goals we will accomplish:

  • Provide a good, well-rounded history class for students.

  • Help students develop analytical skills that they will need for the rest of their academic careers.

  • Help students develop an appreciation or even a love for history.

  • Prepare students to be successful on the STAAR and AP exams.


Required Text

  • Henretta, J., Hinderaker, E., Edwards, R., & Self, R. (2014). America's History (Vol. 8). Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's. (AH) [CR1a]

Optional Text

  • Newman, J., Schmalbach, J. (2016). United States History, Preparing for the Advanced Placement Examination. (3rd ed.). Des Moines: Amsco School Publications. (AMSCO)


New AP US History Curriculum
Section 1: Historical Thinking Skills:

  • Skill Type 1: Chronological Reasoning

Historical Causation

Patterns of Continuity and Change over Time

Periodization

  • Skill Type 2: Comparison and Contextualization

Comparison

Contextualization



  • Skill Type 3: Crafting Historical Arguments from Historical Evidence

Historical Argumentation

Appropriate use of Relevant Historical Evidence



Interpretation and Synthesis

Section 2: Thematic Learning Objectives

  • American and National Identity

  • Politics and Power

  • Work, Exchange, and Technology

  • Migration and Settlement

  • Geography and the Environment

  • America and the World


Section 3: The Concept Outline

  • Period 1: 1491 – 1607 – 5%

  • Period 2: 1607 – 1754 – 10%

  • Period 3: 1754 – 1800 – 12%

  • Period 4: 1800 – 1848 – 10%

  • Period 5: 1844 – 1877 – 13%

  • Period 6: 1865 – 1898 – 13%

  • Period 7: 1890 – 1945 – 17%

  • Period 8: 1945 – 1980 – 15%

  • Period 9: 1980 – present – 5%


The Procedures

In order for all students to learn to their full potential, all school rules will be enforced. In addition to the school rules my own specific classroom rules are also enforced:




  • Work hard

-Succeed in class NOW; the work ethic you build now will carry over

-Work hard for me, I work hard for you



  • Participate in discussion

-It is rude to speak when others are, especially your classmates, wait for your turn

-It is hard to have intelligent discussions if everyone talks at once

-ASK QUESTIONS. If I don’t know the answer, I will find it out


  • I teach BELL to BELL

-There is not time in class for restroom breaks

-Ask for permission to get up for any reason

-Hall passes will not be given out except for extreme circumstances
The Consequences


  • Here are the consequences for following rules in the classroom:

*Trust- if you act like an adult, you will be treated like one.

*Good grades - if you are prompt & prepared each day, you will be successful in class.

*Passing score on the AP test and STAAR test


  • Here are the consequences for breaking rules in the classroom:

*1st offense- Verbal Warning

*2nd offense- Detention (15m)/Call Home/Coach

*3rd offense- Office referral
Cell Phones/Headphones


  • Cell phones are not going to be tolerated in my classroom. I will take them up and turn them into the office if I see them. It is a 15 dollar fine to get them back. We will NOT use them for educational purposes, because I don’t feel that it is necessary.


Subs

  • In the event that you have a sub you are expected to sit in your assigned seat and work on the assignment the sub has planned. Detentions will be issued for those students who I hear a report on.


Online Testing System - Launchpad

  • Our class will run on a system known as Launchpad

  • It has the textbook online, practice questions, study material, etc.

  • Quizzes will be on Launchpad


Binder Portfolio’s

  • Students will be working extensively on their Binder Portfolio. The student will keep all of their notes, class assignments, and projects in the portfolio and bring the portfolio to all classes. There will be assessments over the portfolios and what the students have learned through the work in them.

    • Sections include:

    • 1. Handouts (Syllabus, Curriculum Framework, etc)

    • 2. Warm Ups (20+ sheets of notebook paper)

    • 3. Notes (Textbook notes and lecture notes)

    • 4. Writing (All handouts on writing, and your essays)

    • 5. Documents/Short Answer (All handouts on documents and the docs themselves)

    • 6. Corrections and graded work


The Grades

The class will follow Irving ISD’s grading policy. It focuses around summative grades (quizzes, tests, and essays) counting 60% and formative grades counting 40% (daily work, notes, ect.) For a more detailed description on summative and formative grades please visit the IISD website.

Scale:

A = 90-100%



B = 80-89%

C = 70-79%

F = 0-69%
Summative Grades- will be in the form of weekly reading tests and large unit tests. This will also include Essays from time to time.
Formative Grades- will be in the form of weekly reading notes, due every Monday. There will also be a binder check each 6 week period.
Reassessing


  • Students will be given a minimum of TWO opportunities on all assessments (1 reassessment). Students must reassess within one week receiving their grade on the assignment. In order to be eligible for a reassessment, the student must attend tutoring for re-teaching and complete all formative work that would be involved for that assessment. The reassessment will be in the form of an essay that covers the weekly objectives provided on Black Board.

  • All formatives assignments are due on the date assigned. No late work will be accepted on formative assignments. If a student needs to reassess a formative grade, they have 2 days to do so, but that does not include if the student did not turn it in to begin with.

  • Please visit the Irving ISD website for any additional information on the grading policy.


Corrections

  • Students have the opportunity to turn in corrections on all multiple choice assessments. The student will receive ½ of the missed credit for completing the corrections correctly in the form of extra credit.

  • In order to turn in corrections you must include the following:

    • Rewrite the question.

    • Copy in the correct answer with a 3-5 sentence explanation about the correct answer and why it was correct. A direct copy out of the book or Wikipedia does not count. This needs to be in your own words and demonstrate true understanding. Rushed, sloppy, or inadequate work will not count.

Corrections are to help you understand what you missed, and understand the concepts FULLY. Focus on causes and effects in your explanations. Being able to understand why something happens, what it leads to, and how it impacts the US is the key to this class.


**Corrections Examples**

  • 1) Restate Question: The Stamp Act Congress was significant because it?
    -State Correct Response: marked an important step toward the unity of the colonies.
    -3-5 sentences explaining the concept/correct answer: The Stamp Act was created to generate revenue for the British to help pay for their debts incurred by the Fr. And Indian War and the stationing of the troops in the Americas. It required people to purchase a stamp to put on all legal documents and was the first real tax to hit all Americans. The Congress allowed colonists from all different regions to come together to discuss different problems and set the precedent for the colonial unity that would be required for the upcoming war.




  • 2) Restate Question: The Tea Act of 1773 was passed in order to –
    - State Correct Response: save the East India Company
    -3-5 sentences explaining the concept/correct answer: The Tea Act was passed to save one of Br. Largest businesses from bankruptcy. It actually lowered the price of tea, but colonists generally preferred the cheaper leaves that were smuggled from Holland. It once again represented an act of taxation without representation and it sought to cut off powerful colonial merchants that made their money off smuggling Dutch tea. This eventually led to the Boston Tea Party by the Sons of Liberty.




  • 3) Restate Question: The most important result of the Stamp Act Congress was the –
    - State Correct Response: imposition of a colonial-wide boycott of British products
    -3-5 sentences explaining the concept/correct answer: Parliament passed the Stamp Act in order to generate some revenue to help pay for the French and Indian War and stationing of the soldiers in the new world. The colonists were not happy that parliament was taking away their power to tax themselves and created the Stamp Act Congress to protest the act. The most effective measure of the Congress was a colonial boycott of British imports. This hurt the British merchants, and they forced their Parliament representatives to eventually repeal the act. Parliament passed the Declaratory Act in an attempt to save face.



Coach Diehl’s Supply List – AP US History

The goal is for every student to receive a 4 or a 5 on their AP test at the end of the year. In order to best prepare for the test please pick up the following supplies:



  • 2 inch binder with 6 dividers

  • Laptop for all assessments, and charger

  • AMSCO book (2016 redesign edition), can be ordered from

http://www.amscopub.com/us-history-preparing-for-ap-exam
Optional Supplies for Brownie Points!!

  • Box of Tissues

  • Colored Paper

  • Hand Sanitizer

  • Extra dividers

The single most important task you have is to READ. Read the textbook, documents, and assignments that you are given. Make sure you turn in your NOTES!





Date

Day

Topic and Content

For Class

Reading and Homework

8/25/14

Mon

Introduction/Syllabus







8/26/14

Tues


Unit 1:

Period 1: 1491 – 1607

Transformations of North America


Class Discussion

AMSCO – Ch. 1 – A New World of Many Cultures (1491 – 1607)

8/27/14

Wed

Class Discussion

AH - Ch. 2 – American Experiments (p. 40 – 75)

8/28/14

Thur

Class Discussion




8/29/14

Fri

Intro do Document Analysis







9/01/14

Mon


Unit 2:

Period 2: 1607 – 1754

British North America and the Atlantic World


No School




9/02/14

Tues

Quiz on Reading

Class Discussion



AH - Ch. 3 – The British Atlantic World (p. 80 – 113)

9/03/14

Wed

Class Discussion

AMSCO – Ch. 2 – The Thirteen Colonies and the British Empire (1607 – 1754)

9/04/14

Thur

Class Discussion




9/05/14

Fri

Document Analysis







9/08/14

Mon


Unit 2:

Period 2: 1607 – 1754

British North America and the Atlantic World


Quiz on Reading

Class Discussion



AH - Ch. 4 – Growth, Diversity, and Conflict (p. 114 – 145)

9/09/14

Tues

Class Discussion

AMS CO – Ch. 3 – Colonial

Society in the 18th Century



9/10/14

Wed

Class Discussion




9/11/14

Thur

Document Analysis




9/12/14

Fri

Writing Practice







9/15/14

Mon


Unit 3:

Period 3: 1754 – 1800

Revolution and Republican Culture



Unit 1 and 2 Test: Writing

AH - Ch. 5 – The Problem of Empire (p. 150 – 181)

9/16/14

Tue

Unit 1 and 2 Test: MC/SA

AMSCO – Ch. 4 – Imperial Wars and Colonial Protest (1754 – 1774)

9/17/14

Wed

Class Discussion




9/18/14

Thur

Document Analysis




9/19/14

Fri

Writing Practice







9/22/14

Mon


Unit 3:

Period 3: 1754 – 1800

Revolution and Republican Culture


Quiz on Reading

Class Discussion



AH - Ch. 6 – Making War and Republican Governments (p. 182 – 213)

9/23/14

Tues

Class Discussion

AMSCO – Ch. 5 –The American Revolution and Confederation (1774 – 1787)

9/24/14

Wed

Class Discussion




9/25/14

Thur

Document Analysis




9/26/14

Fri

Writing Practice







9/29/14

Mon


Unit 3:

Period 3: 1754 – 1800

Revolution and Republican Culture


Quiz on Reading

Class Discussion



AH - Ch. 7 – Hammering Out a Federal Republic (p. 214 – 247)

9/30/14

Tues

Class Discussion

AMSCO - Ch. 6 – The Constitution and the New Republic (1787 – 1800)

10/01/14

Wed

Class Discussion

AMS CO – Ch. 7 – The Age

of Jefferson



10/02/14

Thur

Early Release*

Document Analysis






10/03/14

Fri

Writing Practice




**End of 1st 6 Weeks**




10/06/14

Mon


Unit 3:

Period 3: 1754 – 1800

Revolution and Republican Culture


Quiz on Reading

Class Discussion



AH - Ch. 8 – Creating a Republican Culture (p. 248 – 279)

10/07/14

Tues

Class Discussion




10/08/14

Wed

Class Discussion




10/09/14

Thur

Document Analysis




10/10/14

Fri

Writing Practice







10/13/14

Mon


Unit 4:

Period 4: 1800 – 1848

Overlapping Revolutions


No School




10/14/14

Tues

Unit 3 Test: Writing

AH - Ch. 9 – Transforming the Economy (p. 284 – 313)

10/15/14

Wed

Unit 3 Test: MC/SA

AMSCO – Ch. 8 – Nationalism and Economic Development (1816 – 1848)

10/16/14

Thur

Class Discussion




10/17/14

Fri

Class Discussion







10/20/14

Mon


Unit 4:

Period 4: 1800 – 1848

Overlapping Revolutions


Quiz on Reading

Class Discussion



AH - Ch. 10 – A Democratic Revolution (p. 314 – 343)

10/21/14

Tues

Class Discussion

AMSCO – Ch. 10 – The Age of Jackson

10/22/14

Wed

Class Discussion




10/23/14

Thur

Document Analysis




10/24/14

Fri

Writing Practice







10/27/14

Mon


Unit 4:

Period 4: 1800 – 1848

Overlapping Revolutions


Quiz on Reading

Class Discussion



AH - Ch. 11 – Religion and Reform, 1800 – 1860 (p. 344 – 375)

10/28/14

Tues

Class Discussion

AMSCO – Ch. 11 – Society, Culture and Reform (1820 – 1860)

10/29/14

Wed

Class Discussion




10/30/14

Thur

Document Analysis




10/31/14

Fri

Writing Practice







11/03/14

Mon


Unit 4:

Period 4: 1800 – 1848

Overlapping Revolutions


Quiz on Reading

Class Discussion



AH - Ch. 12 – The South Expands: Slavery and Society, 1800 – 1860 (p. 376 – 405)

11/04/14

Tues

Class Discussion

AMSCO – Ch. 9 – Sectionalism (1820 – 1860)

11/05/14

Wed

Class Discussion




11/06/14

Thur

Document Analysis




11/07/14

Fri

Writing Practice







11/10/14

Mon


Unit 5:

Period 5: 1844 – 1877

Creating and Preserving a Continental Nation


Unit 4 Test: Writing

AH - Ch. 13 – Expansion, War and Sectional Crisis, 1844 – 1860 (p. 410 – 443)

11/11/14

Tues

Unit 4 Test: MC/SA

AMSCO – Ch. 12 – Territorial and Economic Expansion (1830 – 1860)

11/12/14

Wed

Class Discussion

AMS CO – Ch. 13 – The

Union in Peril (1848 – 1861)



11/13/14

Thur

Class Discussion




11/14/14

Fri

Writing Practice




**End of the 2nd Six Weeks**




11/17/14

Mon


Unit 5:

Period 5: 1844 – 1877

Creating and Preserving a Continental Nation


Quiz on Reading

Class Discussion



AH - Ch. 14 – Two Societies at War, 1861 - 1865 (p. 444 – 477)

11/18/14

Tues

Class Discussion

AMSCO – Ch. 14 – The Civil War (1861 – 1865)

11/19/14

Wed

Class Discussion




11/20/14

Thur

Class Discussion




11/21/14

Fri

Document Analysis







12/01/14

Mon


Unit 5:

Period 5: 1844 – 1877

Creating and Preserving a Continental Nation


Quiz on Reading

Class Discussion



AH - Ch. 15 – Reconstruction, 1865 - 1877 (p. 478 – 507)

12/02/14

Tues

Class Discussion

AMSCO – Ch. 15 – Reconstruction (1863 – 1877)

12/03/14

Wed

Class Discussion




12/04/14

Thur

Document Analysis




12/05/14

Fri

Writing Practice







12/08/14

Mon


Unit 5:

Period 5: 1844 – 1877

Creating and Preserving a Continental Nation


Quiz on Reading

Class Discussion



AH - Ch. 16 – Conquering a Continent, 1854 - 1890 (p. 508 – 539)


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