Concentration in Computer Engineering within Bachelor of Science Degree in Electrical Engineering



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Concentration in Computer Engineering within Bachelor of Science Degree in Electrical Engineering




Courses Transferrable from Other UMS Campuses to the University of Southern Maine

The following chart provides general guidance as to which courses offered at other University of Maine System campuses will be accepted as transferable into the Concentration in Computer Engineering within BS in Electrical Engineering undergraduate degree program at the University of Southern Maine.

As shown, links to course descriptions for all courses are provided. Additional courses beyond those listed may be acceptable for transfer as assessed by the appropriate course faculty on the campus to which the student is transferring.
Courses qualifying to fulfill General Education course requirements are handled on a campus-wide basis and are available through a separate information sheet.



University of Southern Maine

Concentration in Computer Engineering within Bachelor of Science Degree in Electrical Engineering

(Curriculum drawn from http://www.usm.maine.edu/engineering/bs-electrical-engineering)



Typical Program showing Acceptable Transfer Courses

(Course transfer information is drawn from https://peportal.maine.edu and confirmed by involved faculty members.)




REQUIRED COURSES

COURSES ACCEPTABLE FOR TRANSFER

Course Number

Course Title

UM

UM-A

UM-F

UM-FK

UM-M

UM-PI

COS 160

Course Description



Structured Problem Solving: Java

Credits: 3





















COS 161

Course Description



Algorithms in Programming

Credits: 3





















COS 170

Course Description



Structured Programming Laboratory

Credits: 3





















COS 285

Course Description



Data Structures

Credits: 3



COS 350




COS 251










COS 350

Course Description



Systems Programming

Credits: 3





















MAT 152

Course Description



Calculus A

Credits: 4



MAT 123

MAT 126


MAT 151

MAT 246A


TME 253

MATB 261


MAT 141

MAT 141M


MAT 255

MAT 111

MAT 126


MAT 131

MAT 153

Course Description



Calculus B

Credits: 4



MAT 124

MAT 127


MAT 152




MAT 142

MAT 256

MAT 127

MAT 132

MAT 252

Course Description



Calculus C

Credits: 4



MAT 228







MAT 370




MAT 231

MAT 350

Course Description



Differential Equations

Credits: 4



MAT 258

MAT 259


















MAT 380

Course Description



Probability and Statistics

Credits: 3



CHB 350

MAT 332


















CHY 113

Course Description



Principles of Chemistry I

Credits: 3



CHY 111

CHY 113


CHY 115

CHY 121


CHY 101

CHY 115


CHY 141

CHY 100

and


CHY 100L

CHY 101

CHY 121

CHY 114

Course Description



Laboratory Techniques I

Credits: 1



CHY 111L

CHY 113L


CHY 123

CHY 117


CHY 101

CHY 115


CHY 141

CHY 100

and


CHY 100L

CHY 100L


CHY 101

CHY 121

CHY 121L


PHY 121

Course Description



General Physics I

Credits: 4



PHY 121




PHY 141







PHY 153

PHY 114

Course Description



Introductory Physics Laboratory I

Credits: 1



PHY 107

PHY 111


PHY 121

PHY 101

PHY 115


PHY 141

PHY 100

PHY 111




PHY 123

Course Description



General Physics II

Credits: 4



PHY 122




PHY 142







PHY 154

PHY 116

Course Description



Introductory Physics Laboratory II

Credits: 1



PHY 108

PHY 112


PHY 122

PHY 102

PHY 116


PHY 142

PHY 101

PHY 112




EYE 112

Course Description



Built Environment: Energy

Credits: 3





















ELE 216

Course Description



Circuits I: Steady-State Analysis

Credits: 4



ECE 210
















ELE 217

Course Description



Circuits II: System Dynamics

Credits: 4


ECE 211

















EGN 260

Course Description



Materials Science for Engineers

Credits: 3





















EGN 301

Course Description



Junior Design Project and the Engineering Profession

Credits: 3





















EGN 304

Course Description



Engineering Economics

Credits: 3



GEE 284

and


MET 484

MET 484

















EGN 402

Course Description



Senior Design Project

Credits: 3





















ELE 172

Course Description



Digital Logic

Credits: 4



ECE 172

ECE 275


ELE 172
















ELE 243

Course Description



Electronics I: Devices and Circuits

Credits: 4



ECE 343
















ELE 271

Course Description



Microprocessor Systems

Credits: 4



ECE 171 (and

ECE 271)


ELE 171
















ELE 314

Course Description



Linear Signals and Systems

Credits: 4



ECE 314
















ELE 346

Course Description



Electronics II: Electronic Design

Credits: 4





















COS 3XX

(or above)
























Note:

In addition to the courses described above, students are required to take 2 Electrical Engineering Electives (ELE or EGN) and 2 Engineering Electives (ELE, EGN or MEE)



University of Southern Maine Computer Engineering Concentration Course Descriptions

COS 160 Structured Problem Solving: Java

An introduction to the use of digital computers for problem solving, employing the Java programming language as a

vehicle. Content includes elementary control structures and data representation methods provided by Java and the object-oriented programming methodology. Course requirements include a substantial number of programming projects. This course

must be taken concurrently with COS 170. Offered each semester.



Prerequisite: successful completion of the USM mathematics proficiency requirement.

Credits: 3.



COS 161 Algorithms in Programming

The development of algorithms and their implementations in a higher-level programming language, with emphasis on

proper design principles and advanced programming concepts. Introduction to the performance analysis of algorithms. Course

requirements include substantial programming projects. Offered each semester.



Prerequisites: COS 160, and working knowledge of word processing and Web browsing.

Credits: 3.



COS 170 Structured Programming Laboratory

Computational experiments will be designed to teach students how to construct reliable software using Java. Topics to be

covered include: Windows system, conditional program flow, iteration, procedures and functions, and symbolic debugging.

Offered each semester.

This course must be taken concurrently with COS 160.

Credits: 1.



COS 285 Data Structures

Basic abstract data types and their representations, fundamental algorithms, and algorithm analysis. Consideration is given

to applications. Specific topics include linked structures, trees, searching and sorting, priority queues, graphs, and hashing.

Course requirements include a substantial programming component. Typically offered only in the fall semester.



Prerequisites: COS 161 and either of MAT 145 or MAT 152, or their equivalents.

Credits: 3.



COS 350 Systems Programming

A study of systems programming concepts and software, including the C programming language and the Unix programming

environment and operating system interface. Students develop their abilities in these areas through programming exercises and

projects. Typically offered only in the spring semester.



Prerequisites: COS 250, COS 285.

Credits: 3.




MAT 152 Calculus A

The first course in a three-semester sequence covering basic calculus of real variables, Calculus A introduces the concept of

limit and applies it to the definition of derivative and integral of a function of one variable. The rules of differentiation and

properties of the integral are emphasized, as well as applications of the derivative and integral. This course will usually include

an introduction to the transcendental functions and some use of a computer algebra system.

Prerequisite: successful completion of the University’s college readiness requirement in mathematics and two years of high school algebra plus geometry and trigonometry or MAT 140.

Credits: 4.


MAT 153 Calculus B

The second course in a three-semester sequence covering basic calculus of real variables, Calculus B usually includes

techniques of integration, indeterminate forms and L’Hopital’s Rule, improper integrals, infinite series, conic sections,

parametric equations, and polar coordinates.



Prerequisite: MAT 152.

Credits: 4.


MAT 252 Calculus C

The third course in a three-semester sequence covering basic calculus of real variables, Calculus C includes vectors, curves

and surfaces in space, multivariate calculus, and vector analysis.

Prerequisite: MAT 153.

Credits: 4.




MAT 350 Differential Equations

A study of various methods for solving ordinary differential equations, including series methods and Laplace transforms.

The course also introduces systems of linear differential equations, Fourier series, and boundary value problems.

Prerequisite: MAT 252.

Credits: 4.




MAT 380 Probability and Statistics

This course explores concepts and techniques of collecting and analyzing statistical data, examines some discrete and

continuous probability models, and introduces statistical inference, specifically, hypothesis testing and confidence interval

construction. Not for mathematics major credit.



Prerequisite: MAT 153.

Credits: 3.


CHY 113 Principles of Chemistry I

A presentation of fundamental principles of chemical science. These principles will be presented in quantitative terms and illustrated by examples of their applications in laboratories and in ordinary non-laboratory experience. This course and CHY 114 (normally taken

concurrently) provide the basis for further study of chemistry.

Prerequisite: satisfaction of USM math minimum proficiency requirements.

Credits: 3.


CHY 114 Laboratory Techniques I

Laboratory experiments to illustrate the principles that are presented in CHY 113 lectures. One recitation and two laboratory hours per

week.

Corequisite: CHY 113.

Credits: 1.


PHY 121K General Physics I

The first of a two-semester sequence introducing the fundamental concepts of physics, using calculus. Topics to be covered include

mechanics, waves, sound, and thermal physics. This course is recommended for students who plan further study in physical sciences,

mathematics, or engineering. It should be taken with PHY 114K, Introductory Physics Laboratory I. Three hours of lecture and one and one-half hours of recitation per week.



Prerequisite: prior or concurrent registration in MAT 152D or equivalent experience.

Credits: 4.


PHY 114K Introductory Physics Laboratory I

Experiments designed to illustrate the concepts studied in PHY 111K and PHY 121K.

Prerequisite: concurrent registration in PHY 111K or 121K. Two hours per week.

Credits: 1.


PHY 123 General Physics II

A continuation of PHY 121K, introducing the fundamental concepts of physics, using calculus. Topics to be covered include electricity, magnetism, and light. This course is recommended for students who plan further study in physical sciences, mathematics, or engineering. It should be taken concurrently with PHY 116, Introductory Physics Laboratory II. Three hours of lecture and one and one-half hours of recitation per week.



Prerequisites: PHY 121K or equivalent and one semester of calculus.

Credits: 4.


PHY 116 Introductory Physics Laboratory II

Experiments designed to illustrate the concepts studied in PHY 112 and PHY 123.



Prerequisite: concurrent registration in PHY 112 or PHY 123. Two hours per week.

Credits: 1.


EYE 112 Built Environment: Energy

Engineers use mathematics and apply scientific principles to design, create, modify, and control physical systems. They communicate

effectively in both written and oral forms, and work in teams as well as alone. This course introduces students to the tools, tasks, and culture of engineering. Students use spreadsheets to solve problems and graph the results. Through class work, laboratory exercises, and independent research, students learn fundamental concepts of devices such as batteries and motors. The course culminates with a project in which student teams design, build, test, demonstrate, and document a device, utilizing the knowledge and skills acquired in the early part of the course. This course is not required for transfer students with more than 24 credits applied toward one of our engineering degree programs. Replaces EGN 100. Lecture 1 hr., Lab 3 hrs. (Fall, Spring.)

Credits: 3.




ELE 216 Circuits I: Steady-State Analysis

An examination of fundamental circuit laws and theorems, network analysis, physical properties and modeling of resistors, inductors, and capacitors, review of engineering standards applicable to circuits and components. Sinusoidal steady-state operation: phasors, and

impedance. Frequency domain analysis, transfer functions, poles and zeros, frequency response, and basic filtering. The course also covers the operation of meters, oscilloscopes, power supplies, and signal generators. Lecture 3 hrs., Lab. 2 hrs. (Fall)

Prerequisites: MAT 153, PHY 123.

Credits: 4.


ELE 217 Circuits II: System Dynamics

Time-domain analysis of first- and second-order systems, based on electric circuits, but drawing analogy to mechanical, fluid, and thermal systems. AC power and polyphase circuits. magnetic coupling. Resonance, Bode plots, frequency response design. Study and application of the Laplace transform for the solution of differential equations governing dynamic systems. Principles of control, feedback, and stability. Lecture 3 hrs., Lab. 2 hrs. (Spring.)



Prerequisite: ELE 216.

Credits: 4.


EGN 260 Materials Science for Engineers

Concepts and relationships between structure, composition, and thermal, optical, magnetic, electrical and mechanical properties of

technologically important materials. Replaces EGN 362 and ELE 262. Lecture 3 hrs., Lab 1 hr. (Fall.)

Prerequisites: PHY 123, MAT 153, CHY 113.

Credits: 3.
EGN 301 Junior Design Project and the Engineering Profession

The fundamental mission of engineering is design. Students, working in teams, learn the fundamentals of developing a specific problem statement, flowcharting, researching, project management, and design actualization, incorporating appropriate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints. Professional issues such as ethics, intellectual property, interview skills, and resume preparation are explored. The student is challenged to consider the work of the engineer in the broader context of societal, personal, and professional responsibility. Lecture 3 hrs. (Spring.)



Prerequisite: advisor permission.

Credits: 3.


EGN 304 Engineering Economics

Introduction to making economic decisions, supply, demand and equilibrium in economics, ethical considerations and ethical dilemmas, Pareto efficiency, investment and cost analysis, time value of money, cash flow, the present value of a cash flow, rate of return of a project, cost-benefit study, breakeven analysis, evaluation of alternatives under budget constraint, sensitivity analysis of economic decisions with respect to changes in economic factors, expected value and economic decision-making under uncertainty, taxes, subsidies and rationing defender challenger problem and replacement analysis, inflation, computer-aided engineering economics using spreadsheets. This course is a requirement for engineering majors, and may also contribute to a Thematic Cluster. Lecture 3 hrs. (Spring, 2-yr rotation.)



Prerequisite: MAT 152.

Credits: 3.


EGN 402 Senior Design Project

Design and implementation of a device or system to perform an engineering function. May be done individually or in small groups, but the contribution is evaluated on an individual basis. Project outcomes include an oral presentation, a demonstration of the device or system, and a final report. The final report must contain a description of the engineering standards that were investigated and/or applied and how the realistic constraints were observed. (Fall, Spring, Summer.)



Prerequisites: EGN 301, the Core Curriculum requirement of Ethical Inquiry, Social Responsibility, and Citizenship, and instructor permission.

Credits: 3.


ELE 172 Digital Logic

Introduction to the design of binary logic circuits. Combinatorial and sequential logic systems. Design with small and medium scale

integrated circuits and programmable logic devices (PLDs). Registers, counters, and random access memories (RAMs). The algorithmic state machine (ASM). Lecture 3 hrs., Lab. 2 hrs. (Spring.)

Credits: 4.


ELE 243 Electronics I: Devices and Circuits

Operation, terminal characteristics and circuit models of p-n junction diodes, bipolar-junction and field-effect transistors. Nonlinear circuit analysis methods: piece-wise-linear, small-signal and SPICE. Biasing and bias stability. Rectifiers, clipper, clamper, Zener regulator circuits, and small signal BJT and FET amplifiers. Analysis, design, and SPICE simulation of such circuits. Replaces ELE 342. Lecture 3 hrs., Lab. 2 hrs. (Spring.)



Prerequisite: EGN 260. Corequisite: ELE 217.

Credits: 4


ELE 271 Microprocessor Systems

The organization of microprocessor-based computers and microcontrollers. Architecture and operation, flow of digital signals, timers,

memory systems. Assembly programming, instruction sets, formats and addressing modes. Input-output concepts: programmed I/O,

interrupts and serial communication. Microprocessor arithmetic. Laboratory experience programming an 8-bit microcontroller. Lecture 3 hrs., Lab. 2 hrs. (Spring, 2-yr rotation.)



Prerequisite: ELE 172.

Credits: 4


ELE 314 Linear Signals and Systems

Introduction to the theory of linear signals and systems. Linear time-invariant system properties and representations; differential and

difference equations; convolution; Fourier analysis; Laplace and Z transforms. Selected topics in sampling, filter design, digital signal

processing, and modulation. Lecture 3 hrs., Lab 2 hrs. (Fall, 2-yr rotation.)



Prerequisite: ELE 217.

Credits: 4


ELE 346 Electronics II: Electronic Design

Analysis and design of electronic circuits with BJTs, FETs and OpAmps for applications in signal generation, amplification, waveshaping, and power control. Topics include differential, multi-stage, linear and power amplifiers; real operational amplifiers and OpAmp applications; design for frequency response, active filters; feedback, stability and oscillators. Simulation and design verification with SPICE. Replaces ELE 343. Lecture 3 hrs., Lab. 2 hrs. (Fall, 2-yr rotation.)



Prerequisites: ELE 217, ELE 243.

Credits: 4

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