Coordinating conjunction joining independent clauses Coordinating conjunctions



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NAME______________________________ SEPTEMBER 17, 2013 7 - ______

Comma Rules

  1. Use a comma before a coordinating conjunction joining independent clauses


Coordinating conjunctions – and, but, for, nor, or, so, yet
Josh wants to go to eat pizza, and he wants to go to a movie after dinner.
April has the flu, but she is going to school to take her test.




  1. Use a comma after a dependent clause when it comes before an independent clause.

Dependent clause – A group of words that has both a subject and a verb but (unlike an independent clause) cannot stand alone as a sentence
Independent clause - can stand alone as a sentence, also known as a main clause or simple sentence.
Because the storm clouds continue to grow darker, we have decided to cancel our beach plans.

Although Zachary recently earned his driver’s license, he has been driving for several months with a permit.





  1. Use a comma after an introductory element (yes, no, Lastly, in summary,)


Finally, I made a perfect score on my vocabulary pre-quiz today!
Despite her repeated requests, Susie could not get someone to return her phone call.







  1. Use a comma between all items in a series

At the mall we bought two pairs of shoes, a gym bag, a water bottle, and a pair of workout shorts.


The flower medley consisted of tulips, roses, carnations, and lilies.




  1. Use a comma between coordinate adjectives (adjectives describe nouns)

In the attic we found old, thin paper cutouts we used to play with when we were children.





TUESDAY WARM UP

Add commas correctly to each sentence.
1. Maria Rodriguez was born in Puerto Rico but she moved to Atlanta with her family.
2. Although Maria spoke only Spanish before the move she learned English very

quickly.
3. Many Latin American children were in Maria’s new school so she felt comfortable.


4. Even though Eastwood Elementary was small it was well-funded and well-managed.
5. Ms. Karr Mr. Rivera and Mrs. Johnson were Maria’s fourth grade teachers.
RUN ON SENTENCES

A run on sentence is two or more sentences incorrectly written as one sentence. To correct a run – on, write separate sentences, using a period or combine the sentences using a comma and conjunction or a semicolon.
Example: Sally wrote novels she wrote essays.

  • Sally wrote novels. She wrote essays. (Period)

  • Sally wrote novels, and she wrote essays. (Comma and conjunction)

  • Sally wrote novels; she wrote essays. (Semicolon)

Make corrections to the following sentences. If a sentence is not a run-on, write “Correct.”




  1. We went to a movie we stopped for a snack.

  2. The school bus stopped at the corner of my street.

  3. The scary dog barked and growled, the thief turned and ran.


Add commas to each sentence.



  1. Because Maria made high grades the principal asked her parents to allow

her to go directly to the sixth grade.



  1. Mr. Rodriquez Maria’s mother and the principal all wanted Maria to have a chance to go to college.




  1. Despite her reservations about the move Maria’s mother wanted her daughter to be

challenged in school.


  1. Because Maria began to do better in her classes she was much happier and seemed to like school more than ever.




  1. Yes there was one class Maria found difficult it was athletics.




  1. Children like Maria who was small for her age are likely to find physical competition

difficult.

RUN ON SENTENCES
Make corrections to the following sentences. If a sentence is not a run-on, write “Correct.”

  1. Maria and her mom went to the movies, they shared popcorn and chocolate.



  1. During the concert, I had to leave to take an emergency phone call, I walked outside to keep from disturbing others.



  1. Dr. Jones and his nurse will attend the medical conference in January, and they will speak to other medical professionals during their visit to clarify the new procedure.

WEDNESDAY WARM UP

Add commas correctly to each sentence.

  1. Because Sharon and David were concerned about school loans they decided to bank their money for the future.



  1. Therefore we need to move ahead to finish on time.



  1. To prepare for the lecture Dr. Plank read Thomas Jefferson Thomas Paine and Abraham Lincoln.



  1. Finding an honest intelligent leader has been impossible.

Subject –Verb agreement

  • Circle the correct verb form that is in agreement with the subject.

  • Label the subject – S



  1. In the alley behind the building (is, are) three dumpsters for recycling.



  1. A brook (gurgles, gurgle) through the leafy forest.




  1. The farms of Nebraska (produces, produce) millions of bushels of grain.



  1. Michael (was, were) studying for the arduous science test.




  1. Three months (passes, pass) during summer vacation.

Add commas where needed. Use comma rules for help.

When I wake up the other side of the bed is cold. My fingers stretch out seeking Prim’s warmth but finding only the rough canvas cover of the mattress. She must have had bad dreams and climbed in with our mother. Of course she did. This is the day of the reaping.

I prop myself up on one elbow. There’s enough light in the bedroom to see them. My little sister Prim curled up on her side cocooned in my mother’s body their cheeks pressed together. In sleep my mother looks younger still worn but not so beaten-down. Prim’s face is as fresh as a raindrop as lovely as the primrose for which she was named. My mother was very beautiful once too. Or so they tell me.

Excerpt from: The Hunger Games – Suzanne Collins

THURSDAY WARMUP



Subject – Verb Agreement

  • circle the correct verb form that is in agreement with the subject.

  • Label the subject – S

28. The world (change, changes) so rapidly that we can hardly keep up.

29. People (is, are) often ten or twenty years behind the times in their knowledge of the world.


30. People who (live, lives) in poverty often do not even have television or newspapers.
31. He (doesn’t, don’t) want to be the only one not chosen to play.
32. Life (is, are) very complicated for some students who struggle with expectations.
33. Traditionally, college students (has, have) been very active in politics.
34. There (is, are) both men and women at the meeting.
35. Unfortunately, students in class (has, have) very poor work habits.

36. Each of you (has, have) an equal chance to make good grades.

37. All of the children (was, were) hunting Easter eggs in the garden.

38. A notebook and a pen (is, are) lying on the desk in the library.

39. My son, along with two friends, (is, are) coming for the weekend.

40. Sitting on the sofa (was, were) two students from Thailand.


Double check that you have completed each section, and turn this in to the correct period box on Thursday!

TEKS: 19 A, C, 20 B,

Corrected


When I wake up, the other side of the bed is cold. My

fingers stretch out, seeking Prim’s warmth but finding only

the rough canvas cover of the mattress. She must have had

bad dreams and climbed in with our mother. Of course, she

did. This is the day of the reaping.
I prop myself up on one elbow. There’s enough light in

the bedroom to see them. My little sister, Prim, curled up

on her side, cocooned in my mother’s body, their cheeks

pressed together. In sleep, my mother looks younger, still

worn but not so beaten-down. Prim’s face is as fresh as a

raindrop, as lovely as the primrose for which she was named.



My mother was very beautiful once, too. Or so they tell me.
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