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Country: Ghana
Final DRAFT

Women Peace and Security Institute Start Up support to Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Centre
UNDAF Outcome(s)/Indicator(s):
Expected Outcome(s)/Indicator (s):

The programme outcome will expand capacity-building, training and research support to influence women’s contributions to political peace negotiation processes, operational peacekeeping and security sector reform activities, and policy approaches to inform the regional peace and security agenda in Africa.


The objective of this programme is to lay the foundation for full-scale operation of a Peace and Security Institute for Women in Africa that will serve as a knowledge centre for expanding technical capacity, training and policy research and analysis on women, peace and security in order to better-inform the broader peace and security agenda in Africa.

Expected Output(s)/Annual Targets:

The programme will produce 4 outputs to achieve its objective: 1) Baseline study undertaken on the role and situation of women in each of the five programme pillars of the Peace and Security Institute for Women; 2) Conceptual framework and institutional mechanisms to guide the establishment of the Peace and Security Institute for Women elaborated; 3) Operational plan for the Peace and Security Institute for Women adopted and resource mobilization drive initiated; 4) Peace and Security Institute for Women in Africa launched and operationalized



Implementing partner: Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training Centre
Other partners:

UNDP, UNIFEM, UNFPA, Government of Norway, Government of the Netherlands



Agreed by the Implementing Partner:
Agreed by UNDP:



Budget:

Total budget: USD 1,540,800

Allocated resources:

UNDP USD 200,000

UNIFEM USD 360,000

UNFPA USD 70,000

Government of Norway NOK 3,000,000

Government of the Netherlands

Unfunded budget: USD _________

Programme Period: January 2010 – December 2011

Programme Component:

Programme Title: Women Peace and Security Institute Start Up support to KAIPTC

Budget Code:

Programme Duration: 1st of January 2010 to 31 December 2011

Type of Intervention: Capacity building, training and institutional development support



Table of Contents
Abbreviations 3
I Executive Summary 4
II Situation Analysis 6

Rationale for establishment of a Peace and Security

Institute for Women

Linkages to Ongoing Initiatives
III Strategy and Objective 12
IV Outputs and activities 14
V Implementation Strategy 18
VI Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment Strategy 20
VII Links to Global Initiatives 21
VIII Partnership Strategy 22
IX Management Arrangements 23
X Programme Management Team 23
XI Financial Management and Reporting 25
XII Monitoring and Evaluation 25
XIII Assumptions and Risks 30
XIV Preliminary List of Organisations to be consulted 31
XV Programme Results and Resources Framework 33
XVI Project Annual Work plan 38


Abbreviations

ABIC Angie Brooks International Centre for Peace

ACCORD African Centre for the Constructive Resolution of Disputes

ALC Africa Leadership Centre

AU African Union

BCPR Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery

EAC East African Community

ECCAS Economic Community for Central African States

ECOWAS Economic Community for West Africa States

DPA Department of Political Affairs

DPKO Department of Peacekeeping Operations

G-CRP Global Centre for Research on Gender, Crisis Prevention and Recovery

GES Gender Equality Strategy

IGAD Intergovernmental Authority on Development

KAIPTC Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training Centre

MoWAC Ministry of Women and Children’s Affairs

MoFA Ministry of Foreign Affairs

NGO Non-Governmental Organisation

OSAGI Office of the Special Adviser on Gender Issues and the Advancement of Women

RBA Regional Bureau for Africa

RCF III Third Regional Programme for Africa

SADC Southern African Development Community

SCR Security Council Resolution

SSRC Social Science Research Council

UN United Nations

UN Action UN Action against Sexual Violence in Conflict

UNIFEM United Nations Development Fund for Women

UNDP United Nations Development Programme

UNFPA United Nations Population Fund

UN-INSTRAW United Nations International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women

UNOWA United Nations Office for West Africa

WIPSENT-Africa Women, Peace and Security Network-Africa


I Executive Summary

This proposal seeks to implement a start-up phase for the operation of a Women, Peace and Security Institute in Africa to support the full implementation of Security Council Resolutions 1325 and 1820 on women, peace and security in Africa. The proposed Institute will serve as a knowledge centre for expanding technical capacity, training and policy research and analysis on women, peace and security in order to better-inform the broader peace and security agenda in Africa. First, it will invest in expanding the technical capacities of women to participate in peace negotiations, given their marginal representation in these processes to date. Second it will support women in military and police institutions to participate in peacekeeping and facilitate gender sensitive reforms of security sector institutions. Third, it will provide a platform for women to meaningfully shape and inform the research and policy agenda on issues of gender, peace and security. Fourth, it will facilitate a more systematic documentation of women’s peacemaking experiences.

The proposed Women, Peace and Security Institute will support a move away from the traditional “project-based approach” to supporting the women, peace and security agenda, and will instead provide an institutional base and knowledge centre from which to influence and inform the policy, research and training agenda on peace and security in Africa. Further, it will facilitate enhanced visibility and attention to issues of gender, peace and security, whilst also supporting mainstream African institutions working on peace and security issues to better integrate this agenda into their policies and programmes.

The proposed activities of the Women, Peace and Security Institute in Africa will stress five strategic types of interventions which will provide critical contributions to help redress existing gaps to women’s participation in peace processes, whilst serving as an important complement to the work of other institutions supporting the women, peace and security agenda. The five proposed areas pertain to: a) women’s participation in peace negotiations and preventive diplomacy efforts in Africa; b) women’s leadership role in security institutions and participation in peacekeeping activities; c) African women’s leadership in addressing gender-based violence in conflict; d) policy and academic research on gender, peace and security; e) documentation of women’s contribution to peace processes in Africa.


The justification in the choice of these five areas has been provided through the result of recent research and policy reviews on the implementation of Security Council Resolution 1325, including the annual reports of the Secretary-General to the Security Council on the implementation of Resolution 1325, as well as research and policy analysis undertaken by UN entities including UNIFEM and DPKO, which have highlighted these gaps.
The programme will serve as the first phase of operation of the Women, Peace and Security Institute, which will be implemented over a 24-month period. Four expected outputs will be produced during this first phase of the Institute: 1)A baseline analysis on the role and situation of women in each of the five programme pillars of the Women, Peace and Security Institute; 2) The design of a blue print, including institutional mechanisms to guide the management of the Women, Peace and Security Institute; 3) Mobilization of resources to support the operation of the Institute beyond the start-up phase; 4) Launch and full-scale operationalization of the Women, Peace and Security Institute in Africa.

The second phase of the Institute’s operations will implement a 5-year operational plan and a 2-year work plan which will commence upon completion of Phase 1. The activities of the second phase will include: provision of capacity-building and training services, including training to enhance women’s leadership in peace negotiations and in security sector institutions; convening of policy reviews and dialogue on gender, peace and security; maintaining and coordinating a knowledge platform of women’s contributions to peace processes; supporting mainstream institutions in Africa to integrate a gender perspective in their training and other programme activities and; supporting African countries which participate significantly in regional and international peacekeeping to revise and adopt gender-sensitive security sector policies.


The programme will be implemented as a UN-supported initiative and will be housed in the Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training Centre (KAIPTC), which stands as one of the key institutions in Africa providing leadership on research, training and capacity-building in the area of peace and security. The selection of KAIPTC as an implementing partner for this programme is informed by a number of key factors. These include the fact that KAIPTC stands as a leading Centre of Excellence in Africa in the field of peace and security; it is well resourced and capacitated to provide a base for a regional programme of this nature and has the logistical and technical facilities to support the programme; the programme focus is well-aligned with areas of programme priority of KAIPTC; and the programme builds on an existing partnership between UNDP and KAIPTC for implementation of a regional Small Arms Control Project.
A partnership strategy to guide the implementation of the start-up programme will underline cooperation with key regional inter-governmental institutions in Africa, particularly the African Union (AU) the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), the Southern African Development Community (SADC), amongst others. Partnership arrangements will also extend to existing women’s organizations and networks working to support peace processes in Africa, including Femmes Africa Solidarite, Women, Peace and Security Network-Africa, and the recently launched Angie Brookes International Centre for Women’s Research, Peace and Security and the Africa Leadership Centre which is currently under establishment. The institute will seek to sign Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) to guide cooperation with partner institutions beyond the start-up phase.
A small secretariat will be established at the Kofi Annan Peacekeeping Training Centre to coordinate implementation of programme activities during the start-up phase, working under the guidance of a programme board, which will be established to support its work. Financial oversight will be provided by the UNDP Country Office in Accra, Ghana.
At the end of the start-up phase a full review of the programme will be undertaken to measure achievements and to capture lessons learned, which will in turn inform a transitioning of the programme from the start-up arrangements into the next full-scale operational phase of the Women, Peace and Security Institute.
The estimated total budget for the 24-month start-up phase of the programme is:

USD $1,540,800
II Situation Analysis

In nearly a decade since the United Nations Security Council adopted its Resolution 1325 on women, peace and security, the assessment of progress relating to women’s contributions to peace processes in Africa remains mixed.


The challenge of building sustainable peace and security in Africa has yet to fully embrace the skills and capacities of women to inform such processes at formal levels. Much of the contributions made by women to support the peace and security agenda to date are evident at informal and community levels, where they remain largely undocumented, and often have limited influence on mainstream policy decisions on peace and security. Bridging the gap between the contributions of women at informal levels on the one hand, and their effective participation and influence over formal processes of peacemaking on the other, remains an outstanding challenge.
The absence of an institutional base to consolidate, analyse and build the capacity of women to meaningfully contribute to peace processes further contributes to this gap. Current efforts to promote women’s participation in this regard are generally captured through ad hoc or project-based initiatives, which do not provide a sufficient anchor to consolidate knowledge, build capacity and inform mainstream policy decisions on peace and security in a sustained way.
To date, no institution exists in Africa with a specific mandate and dedicated resources to strengthen the technical skills of women to better influence and inform processes for negotiating peace, and/or for shaping the policy-based research agenda on issues of gender peace and security. Mainstream organizations working on the agenda of peace and security often adopt a “project-based approach” to supporting the women, peace and security agenda, such that institutionalization of this work remains weak.
Rationale for establishment of Women, Peace and Security Institute

This proposal aims to implement a start-up phase for the operation of a Women, Peace and Security Institute in Africa. The institute will provide a holistic response to implementation of existing mandates on women, peace and security by addressing gaps at both operational and policy levels. At the operational level it will underline capacity-building and training support to enhance the technical skills of women to better influence and participate in peace processes as negotiators and mediators, while also supporting women’s participation and leadership in security sector institutions in Africa. The institute will also enhance leadership and skills of African women to respond as respond as gender-based practitioners to support victims of sexual violence in conflict-affected situations. At the policy level, the institute will provide support to address research gaps in the field of gender, peace and security, and support increased contribution of African women to policy-based research activities to advance regional peace and security. The Institute will also foster a unique African perspective and support mainstream peace and security institutions in Africa to better integrate a gender perspective within their work.


The proposed activities of the Women, Peace and Security Institute in Africa will stress five strategic types of interventions which will provide critical contributions to help redress existing gaps to women’s participation in peace processes, whilst also serving as an important complement to the work of other institutions supporting the women, peace and security agenda. The five proposed areas are: a) women’s participation in peace negotiations and preventive diplomacy efforts in Africa; b) women’s leadership role in security institutions and participation in peacekeeping activities; c) African women’s leadership in responding to gender-based violence in conflict; d) policy and academic research on gender, peace and security; e) documentation of women’s contribution to peace processes in Africa.
The justification in the choice of these five areas has been provided through the result of recent research and policy reviews on the implementation of Security Council Resolution 1325, including the annual reports of the Secretary-General to the Security Council on the implementation of Resolution 1325 which have highlighted these gaps.
More specifically, a 2008 study by the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM) confirmed a continuing dearth in the meaningful participation of women in peace negotiations processes eight years after the adoption of Resolution 1325. No women have been appointed Chief or Lead peace mediators in UN-sponsored peace talks; only 2.4% of signatories to 21 major peace processes were women; and women’s participation in negotiation delegations averaged 7.6%1. The UN Department of Peacekeeping Operations, through a series of policy reviews in 2006 and 2007, with leading Members States that contribute to UN peacekeeping efforts, also revealed persisting gaps in the national security and defence policy arena of countries contributing to peacekeeping and the absence of targeted strategic interventions to promote women’s professional leadership advancement in this sector in most countries in Africa, a fact which continues to limit women’s participation in uniformed peacekeeping activities. Currently, women comprise less than 2% of military personnel from Africa serving in UN peacekeeping missions, and less than 5% of police personnel. The number of African women serving in senior positions in military and police peacekeeping functions is negligible. Currently, there are no African women serving in military leadership positions, whilst only two African women hold senior positions in police components of UN peacekeeping as Senior Police Adviser and Deputy Police Commissioner2.
The use of sexual violence as a tactic of war has become a widespread feature of recent conflicts in Africa and around the world. In June 2008, the UN Security Council adopted Resolution 1820 on women, peace and security, which provides a forceful mandate to curb the use of sexual violence against women and girls in conflict. Through the adoption of the Resolution, sexual violence against women and girls in conflict has been firmly established as an impediment to the attainment of global peace and security. In Africa, this Resolution provides an opportunity to enhance the skills and capacities of African women’s organizations to play a lead role in efforts to address sexual and other forms of gender-based violence in conflict and post-conflict settings.
At the research level, the African Women’s Fellowship Programme, initiated by the University of London’s Kings College in 2006 to offer research fellowship positions to a selected number of African women in the field of gender and peace security, has provided demonstrable evidence of the large demand that exists for this area of research. Hundreds of applicants have sought to qualify for the 3 fellowship positions supported by Kings College each year. Furthermore, a global research programme on gender, peace and security being initiated by the Social Science Research Centre in 2009 with the support of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), has been conceived to address persisting policy research gaps in the field of gender, peace and security at the global level. At the level of the fourth programme pillar, the gap in the effective documentation of women’s peacemaking efforts is a widely acknowledged one among women peace activists, many of whom have to date exerted the most influence at the informal level of peacemaking, and at community levels, and whose efforts thereby often go unacknowledged in the formal documentation of peace processes.
The Women, Peace and Security Institute will respond to progress gaps relating to each of these five proposed programme pillars:
(i) Technical Skills for mediation and peace negotiations

Although women’s constituencies have actively lobbied to be represented as part of delegations to peace talks in recent conflicts in Africa (including Burundi, Liberia, Sudan, Somalia, Cote d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo) their contributions continue to be made from the margins of peace negotiations and the numbers of women serving as facilitators to formal peace talks and mediation processes are negligible. This problem is often exacerbated by the unequal representation of women in decision making positions in society as well by attitudes and positions of militarized groups represented in peace negotiations. Increasing the influence and representation of women among peace negotiating teams will provide opportunity to draw on the approaches, techniques and skills-set they bring to the peace table to complement those of their male counterparts. It will also provide greater opportunities to highlight and prioritize on the agenda of peace negotiations, issues of gender-based discrimination and gender-based violence crimes. Further, it will ensure that third-party facilitation teams lead by example in modeling to parties in conflict, the value of gender balanced political representation, thus opening up opportunities to ensure that women who actively engaged in combat, are recognized and represented among the parties to conflict3. In addition to investments in expanding the available pool of formally trained women mediators and peace brokers in Africa, there is an equally pressing need to facilitate an organized professional support network and knowledge-sharing platform among women mediators and negotiators, as a strategy for enhancing their visibility and strengthening their agency to leverage greater influence and contribution to formal peace negotiation processes in Africa. An advocacy strategy which draws on the capacities of civil society organizations to support increased participation of women in peace negotiations will also be a necessary complement to this effort.


The emphasis on broadening technical capacities of women mediators through training, whilst also supporting the establishment of a professional network of women mediators will enable them to better advocate, share information and strategize more effectively as an organized constituency to influence and participate in regional level mediation processes.
(ii) Support to women in security institutions

Whilst widespread recognition exists of the low representation of women in military and police institutions in Africa as conveyed in the statistics provided above, no region-wide platform exists as yet to facilitate thorough and ongoing analysis of the barriers to women’s recruitment and retention in security institutions, to support the design and sharing of strategies and good practices for increasing the recruitment of women to national military and police institutions, and their subsequent deployment to serve in regional and global peacekeeping missions. Such a platform is also necessary to support and nurture the leadership aspirations of women in these institutions, and would also provide an important avenue to facilitate gender-sensitive reforms of these security institutions.


The emphasis on building women’s leadership in security institutions and facilitating regional professional networking among women in such institutions will provide an important entry point to enable them to influence peacekeeping pre-deployment planning and preparations processes and to redress discriminatory policies and procedures within their national security establishments which ultimately impact on their ability to participate in peacekeeping activities. It further has the potential to facilitate greater attention to gender-specific priorities in the security sector.4
(iii) Addressing Gender-based Violence in Conflict

The use of sexual violence as a tactic of war has been evident in most of the recent conflicts in Africa and beyond. The prevalence of sexual is not limited to situations of active conflict but equally poses a significant threat to the security of women and girls in post-conflict situations. To date, there remains important scope to build and expand the capacity of women’s organizations in Africa to lead efforts aimed at addressing sexual violence against women and girls. This effort requires strengthening the skills and capacities of African gender-based violence practitioners to provide services to victims of sexual violence (including emergency medical services, reproductive health services and counseling services) and to support programmes to promote women’s rights and to enhance women’s access to justice in conflict situations.


(iv) Academic and policy research

To date, the contributions of women to shaping the academic and policy research priorities on peace and security in Africa is limited. Moreover, this research and policy agenda is often bereft of any serious gender analysis. Whilst there is growing interest among African women to engage in research activities in the field of peace and security, there is as yet no institutional base to nurture and support this work5. The proposed Institute will thus help to broaden and deepen research capacities on gender, peace and security. Beyond providing a specific institutional base to coordinate research activities on gender, peace and security, there is an equally pressing need to support mainstream universities in Africa to introduce courses on gender, peace and security in order to broaden the pool of expertise in this field, particularly at the post-graduate level, thereby providing a broader basis for influencing the mainstream policy and research agenda. The outline of a post-graduate degree module on gender, peace and security will therefore also be elaborated as part of this Programme, with a view to introducing this as a course programme to a broad range of universities in Africa.


(v) Documentation of women’s peacemaking experiences

There is currently no established base in Africa that offers a space for documentation, reflection and sharing of experiences of women peacemakers, many of whom are making vital contributions to sustaining peace at community levels. This gap hampers opportunities to better-analysis how lessons from these experiences of women can be harnessed to inform national, regional and international policy processes. It also reveals a gap in historical recording of peacemaking experiences in Africa, and presents a missed opportunity for younger African women who could draw inspiration from learning about the experiences of women to support peace efforts in Africa.


Knowledge-sharing and Mainstreaming Strategy

The Programme will seek to influence ongoing programme activities of KAIPTC and other mainstream peace and security institutions and processes in Africa. Within KAIPTC, the Programme outputs will help to influence pre-deployment training activities, briefings and debriefs to senior military and police officials, and high level policy dialogues. The Programme will further facilitate the elaboration of methodological tools to guide troop contributing countries to collect baseline data for addressing gender gaps within their security institutions. The lessons learned and analysis emerging from the Programme activities will also be shared with other mainstream institutions in order to address institutional barriers to women’s participation in peace and security processes in Africa.



Linkages to Ongoing Initiatives
The start-up phase for the proposed Women, Peace and Security Institute will provide an opportunity to review and elaborate strategies to ensure that activities of the institute effectively builds on ongoing initiatives in Africa with complimentary or related objectives. The review will elaborate linkages to guide cooperation with other ongoing initiatives with an aim to strengthen partnerships among like-minded institutions, enhance the sharing of information, expertise and resources, whilst also facilitating a mainstreaming of the outcomes of the work of the Women Peace and Security Institute into the work agenda of key institutions operating in Africa6. Linkages will be established with institutions working on each of the main programme areas of the Women, Peace and Security Institute.
In the first instance, the Women, Peace and Security Institute in Africa will establish linkages with capacity-building and training networks and institutions, whose expertise and resources can be drawn upon to help shape and define the work of the proposed institute. At the global level, this outreach will extend to include the Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue, International Alert and the International Peace Institute, all of which facilitate training and capacity-building in conflict management and mediation processes. Within the UN, linkages will be established with the ongoing work of the Governance, Peace and Security Section of UNIFEM, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), INSTRAW, and the Department of Political Affairs (DPA) and its Mediation Support Unit. The Programme will partner with DPA by sharing its pool of African women mediation experts to provide expert advice to UN mediators and facilitators.
In Africa, this outreach will extend to African women’s advocacy and training networks like Femmes Africa Solidarite, Isis Women’s International Cross Cultural Exchange (Isis/WICCE), and the Women Peace and Security Network- Africa (WIPSEN-Africa), which are all civil society organizations supporting advocacy and leadership capacity-building to enhance women’s participation in peace processes, as well as to the newly-established Angie Brookes International Centre for Women’s Research, Peace and Security and the Africa Leadership Centre. Opportunities for establishing cooperation agreements with these organizations will be pursued as part of a strategy to ensure complimentary efforts and enhance and broaden overall impact of efforts to advance the women, peace and security agenda in Africa. Partnership with mainstream civil society institutions in Africa supporting mediation training activities including the African Centre for the Constructive Resolution of Disputes (ACCORD), Center for Conflict Resolution (CCR) and the Nairobi Peace Initiative-Africa will be underlined in this respect. Partnerships will also extend to African academic research and human rights institutions and networks, including the All African University.
At a second level, linkages will be established with institutions providing peacekeeping training, including training to inform security sector reform efforts. This partnership will particularly ensure outreach to peace and security organizations in the Global South. At the global level, the Geneva Centre for the Control of Armed Forces (DCAF) will be an important partner, given its work to facilitate gender-sensitive reform of security sector institutions. The work of UN Action against Sexual Violence in Conflict to support guidance and training activities on the protection of women and girls from sexual violence in conflict will also be tapped7. At the regional level in Africa, mainstream peacekeeping training centres, including KAIPTC and ACCORD will serve as important partners in this respect.
The Institute will also aim to build on and scale up existing UN-supported initiatives to implement mandates on women, peace and security in Africa, such as an ongoing pilot initiative of UNFPA, UNIFEM and OSAGI to address capacity gaps in the design of indicators to monitor implementation of National Action Plans for implementation of SCR 1325. This will ensure the expansion of the target countries from the 3 pilots (Sierra Leone, Uganda and Cote d’Ivoire) to other countries in Africa.
At the inter-governmental level in Africa, strategic linkages will also be fostered with regional inter-governmental organizations in Africa that are defining security sector policies and overseeing regional peacekeeping activities, particularly the Peace and Security Council of the Africa Union, the Economic Community of Central African States (ECCAS), the East African Community, the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), the Intergovernmental Authority for Development (IGAD), the Southern African Development Community (SADC), the UN Economic Commission for Africa, the UN Office for West Africa (UNOWA) and UN Peacekeeping Missions in Africa. Outreach efforts will also extend to individual governments participating in peacekeeping activities, as well as those undergoing post-conflict transitions, particularly through the Ministries of Gender, Ministries of Defense and Ministries of Interior, to inform the policy decisions of these governments.
At the research level, linkages will be established with UNDP-supported projects or initiatives with complimentary objectives. Specifically, the Social Science Research Council which is implementing a UNDP-supported project to establish a Global Centre for Research on Gender, Crisis Prevention and Recovery (G-CPR), will be an important partner in implementation of the research activities of the Women Peace and Security Institute. This latter project aims to strengthen global research capacity, knowledge sharing and tools to support research on gender, crisis prevention and recovery. Research partnerships will also extend to other global partners, supporting documentation and research activities on women, peace and security, including the Joan B Kroc Institute for Peace in the United States, the Africa Women Fellowship Programme at Kings College, University of London, INSTRAW and the University of Peace in Costa Rica. Additionally the Peace and Security Institute for Women in Africa will foster partnerships with mainstream African research institutions including the Conflict Prevention, Management and Research Division of the Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training Centre (KAIPTC), the Centre for Conflict Resolution, and the Council on the Development of Economic and Social Science Research in Africa (CODESRIA).

III Strategy and Objective
Overall Goal

The overall goal of the Programme is to lay the foundation for full-scale operation of a Women, Peace and Security Institute in Africa that will serve as a knowledge centre for expanding technical capacity, training and policy research and analysis on women, peace and security in order to better-inform the broader peace and security agenda in Africa.


Specifically, this goal will be realized through the implementation of baseline studies and situational analyses on the five proposed programme pillars of the Institute (women’s participation in peace negotiations and conflict mediation; support to women in security institutions; African women’s leadership in responding to gender-based violence in conflict; academic and policy research on gender, peace and security; and documentation of women’s peacemaking efforts); elaboration of an operational plan, training modules and tools as well as institutional mechanisms to guide the full-scale operation of the Women, Peace and Security Institute; mobilization of financial resources to support the work of the Institute; and the launch and full-scale operationalization of the Women, Peace and Security Institute.
The proposed Institute will serve as a centre of excellence and an African-led resource centre that will expand capacity-building, training and research to influence women’s contributions to political peace negotiation processes, operational peacekeeping and security sector reform activities, and policy approaches in the field of regional peace and security. The Institute will seek to influence the direction of mainstream governmental and non-governmental African institutions working in the field of peace and security, and serve as a key reference base from which these mainstream institutions can access cutting edge information and knowledge to facilitate the incorporation of a gender perspective in their work. It will also seek to influence the national, regional and global policy agenda on peace and security.
Based on the outcomes of the baseline studies and the operational plan developed during the start-up phase, the activities of the Women, Peace and Security Institute in the next phase will work to: provide training and capacity-building to enhance women’s leadership in peace negotiations and the security sector in Africa; facilitate and convene policy discussions and reviews on gender, peace and security; facilitate capacity-building and skills training to enhance African women’s leadership to address sexual and other forms of gender-based violence; document and maintain a knowledge base of practical contributions of women to enhancing peace processes in Africa; support the mainstreaming of a gender perspective in the work of peace and security institutions in Africa; and support African governments to review and address gender gaps in the policies and operational practices of security institutions.
In addition to supporting Ghana’s commitment and contribution to sub-regional and regional consolidation of peace, this programme also integrally advances the corporate commitment of the United Nations to support implementation of SCR 1325 and SCR 1820 in Africa. For UNDP, the programme will reinforce ongoing work to support women’s empowerment and gender equality in line with the Gender Equality Strategy (GES) of the Organisation, as well as the Eight Point Agenda for Women’s Empowerment and Gender Equality in Crisis Prevention and Recovery. Furthermore, the programme is in line with UNDP’s 2008-2011 Third Regional Programme for Africa (RCF III) which has an overarching purpose of developing local capacities across four focus areas, including the area of conflict prevention, peace building and recovery.
The programme objective also advances the ongoing work of UNIFEM to support implementation of Security Council Resolution 1325, including support to enhance the participation of women in peace negotiations and to support gender-sensitive approaches to security sector reform processes.
The programme will also build on the priorities of UNFPA for implementation of SCR 1325, including work to train security service personnel working in conflict-affected countries to more effectively address the needs of women victims of sexual violence. The programme will further reinforce ongoing efforts of UNFPA to work with partner institutions in order to develop indicators for monitoring implementation of SCR 1325 and will provide an ideal opportunity to scale up ongoing activities and to use the Institute for coordination of this work in the medium to long term.
The pogramme would thus provide an additional entry point to facilitate further consolidation of UNIFEM, UNFPA and UNDP’s support to the women, peace and security agenda in Africa.
The programme will be implemented over a 24-month period, embracing the experiences and inputs of Anglophone, Francophone and Lusophone countries.
IV Output and Activities
The programme outcome will be attained through five key outputs that will be realized during the start-up phase.
Output 1: Knowledge base of information is established to identify, analyze and respond to gaps relating to women’s participation in the field of peace and security in Africa, and to facilitate effective progress monitoring
A critical aspect of the planning process for the operation of the Women, Peace and Security Institute in Africa will be the implementation of a review of ongoing initiatives to support the women, peace and security agenda in Africa - incorporating desk-based reviews and site visits to mainstream institutes providing complimentary services in Africa, and to women’s institutes in regions outside of Africa providing similar services. This exercise will also include the commissioning of comprehensive baseline studies relating to the four proposed programme pillars of the Institute, namely: women’s participation in peace negotiations and conflict mediation processes; academic and policy research capacity on gender, peace and security; documentation of women’s peacemaking efforts; and strategies to enhance the role of women in security institutions. The baseline surveys will elaborate ongoing project initiatives focused on the four programme areas; identify gaps to women’s participation in these areas, as well as opportunities for enhanced support.
At the level of enhancing women’s participation in peace negotiations, a baseline directory of conflict mediation resources and capacities in Africa will be compiled, and will include available information on technically trained male and female mediators and negotiators, and will also identify technical facilitators from this directory who will help oversee the proposed mediation training activities of the Institute beyond the start-up phase. This investment will also provide analysis of the reasons for the under-representation of women in peace negotiations. This process will also work to facilitate the establishment of an information-sharing, networking and advocacy platform among women mediators in Africa during once the Institute is fully operational.
At the second component level, an analysis will be undertaken of the situation of women in military and police services in the 12 leading African countries participating in UN peacekeeping missions. The focus on military and police security institutions during this start-up phase derives from the fact that they draw the largest number of personnel to peacekeeping and also have the lowest representation of women within their ranks. This study will lay the groundwork for strategic interventions that could be supported by the Women, Peace and Security Institute to advance national level policy reforms, and to enhance leadership-building and training opportunities for women in security establishments. The outcomes of this analysis will also provide important baseline information to peacekeeping troop and police contributing countries in Africa, to facilitate the development of National Actions Plan on implementation of Resolution 1325 in these countries. After the start-up phase, and based on available capacity, the scope of engagement by the Women, Peace and Security Institute with other security establishments will be broadened to include corrections, border and immigration officials.
At the third component level, a baseline survey will be undertaken to assess existing skills and capacities within women’s organizations in Africa to address the needs of victims of sexual and other forms of gender-based in conflict and post-conflict situations. The outcomes of this assessment will provide a basis for elaborating capacity-development training programmes to enhance the capacities of African women’s organizations to play a lead role in providing response services to victims of sexual violence, and in supporting preventative programmes and programmes to enhance women’s access to justice.
At the research level, a similar survey of research capacities and resources on gender, peace and security, including a directory of African researchers specializing in the field of gender, peace and security will be compiled. This process will also incorporate existing research gaps, which would be elaborated through an expert group meeting that would be convened to for this purpose. The outcomes of the expert group meeting will also provide the basis for outlining the core elements of a post-graduate Masters Degree course on Gender, Peace and Security in Africa, which will be developed by the Institute after the start-up phase.
At the fifth component level, a baseline survey of women-led peacemaking initiatives will be compiled. This will be complemented by a review of options to best-support documentation and analysis of the experiences of women peacemakers both under the auspices of the Women, Peace and Security Institute, as well as through residency programmes and research fellowships within mainstream universities in Africa which have the capacity and research facilities to host women practitioners for short-term periods. This proposed strategy will foster greater linkages between academics and practitioners in the field of gender, peace and security.
Output II: The medium-long-term planning and operational framework to guide the work of the Women, Peace and Security Institute is in place
The start-up programme for the Women, Peace and Security Institute in Africa will provide an opportunity to elaborate a detailed conceptual framework and work plan to guide the operations of the institute based on the outcomes of the substantive baseline study. This process will also include the elaboration of a set of simple start-up strategies to address the core organizational requirements; identification of key partner institutions; establishment of a governance framework and management arrangements to guide the work of the institute; and mobilization of resources to sustain the activities of the Institute in the medium to long-term. The outcomes of this undertaking will inform the elaboration of a 5-year programme framework with an accompanying budget, and a 2-year operational work plan to support the running of the Peace and Security Institute for Women in Africa.
The operational work plan will detail the substantive programme priorities for the second phase of work of the Institute, once the start-up phase is completed. These will build on the outcomes of the baseline surveys undertaken during the start-up phase, and will implement activities to:


  • Provide capacity-building and training programmes to enhance women’s leadership in peace negotiations and in the security sector in Africa;

  • Facilitate and convene policy discussions on gender, peace and security;

  • Provide training to enhance the skills and capacities of gender-based violence practitioners in Africa

  • Document and maintain a knowledge base of practical contributions of women to enhancing peace processes;

  • Support the mainstreaming of a gender perspective in the work of KAIPTC and other mainstream peace and security institutions in Africa, through influencing pre-deployment training activities, briefings and debriefs to senior military and police officials, and high level policy dialogues; and

  • Support troop and police contributing countries in Africa to review and address gender gaps in the policies and operations of their security institutions using methodological tools developed during the start-up phase.

  • Provide technical support to African countries to develop indicators to monitor implementation of National Action Plans on SCR 1325 and SCR 1820

The training modules and resource materials that will facilitate the above activities of the Institute after completion of the start-up phase will be developed and consolidated with support of training experts and consultants as part of this process.


The work plan will also outline the initial core functions and staffing requirements for the first two years, and would also establish the accounting, communication and operational and budget oversight functions before further expansion. The broader 5-year programme framework will outline the contingency options for expanding the Institute in an incremental and sustainable manner. The plan will also outline a suitable institutional model that would best facilitate realization of the goals of the Institute. It is anticipated that the Institute will continue to be located within KAIPTC after the start-up phase, operating with programmatic autonomy. The governance framework to guide the operations of the Women, Peace and Security Institute will build on the board structure for the start-up phase. Thus the inputs of the board will facilitate decision-making on the personnel and administrative resource requirements after the start-up phase.
A public information and communication strategy to enhance visibility and influence of the institute will also be elaborated within the plan. A resource mobilization strategy to support realization of short, medium and long term sustainable funding objectives for the Institute will be elaborated, and will guide the launch of a resource mobilization drive upon finalization of the plan.
The technical expertise and inputs of organizational development consultants will be harnessed to support elaboration of the operational plan during the start-up phase.
Output III: Broad-based ownership is established among key stakeholders to collaborate and support the work of the Women, Peace and Security Institute, and financial partnerships are mobilised to support implementation of the medium-long-term operations of the Institute
In order to build region-wide ownership for implementation of the operational plan of the Institute, a partnership strategy to support collaboration and outreach to other organizations working in the field of peace and security in Africa and globally will be developed, to enhance impact of the work of the Institute. As part of this partnership strategy, the operational plan for the Peace and Security Institute for Women will be reviewed and adopted by key stakeholders in Africa and global partners as an important part of efforts to build ownership and consensus around its operations. Specifically, a regional consultation with key stakeholders will be convened, at which the plan will be presented for adoption.
Upon adoption of the operational plan, a resource mobilization drive, spanning a period of six months will be initiated, and would include visits to funding institutions as well as the convening of a specific donor roundtable to mobilize partnerships support for operationalising the plan. The resource mobilization drive will seek to access donor funding mechanisms that are directed at supporting African-based institutions to advance the peace and security agenda in the region. This effort will also target available gender funding facilities of traditional donors of KAIPTC, where the programme will be hosted. The fund-raising drive will also target Foundations that underline support for African-based institutions.
To enhance the status, visibility and resource mobilization efforts of the Institute, six eminent African and global personalities will be identified and invited to serve as patrons to advocate and support the work of the Institute. The programme management team will ensure that the patrons are regularly briefed and informed on progress and developments relating to the work of the Institute so as to facilitate their advocacy efforts on behalf of the Institute.
In order to enhance advocacy and knowledge sharing and to solicit feedback on the work of the Institute, a knowledge management platform will be established as part of the start-up phase of the Women, Peace and Security institute. This platform will include establishment and maintenance of a website to enhance outreach and advocacy efforts of the Institute.
An evaluation of the programme will also be undertaken to review and document lessons learned, and to assess the outcomes of the start-up phase against the programme objectives established at the outset. The lessons learned from this evaluation process will be used to inform the elaboration of the work plan priorities and implementation strategy of the fully-operational Institute. The outcomes of the evaluation will also guide the design of formal partnership terms and arrangements with other institutions and networks.
Output IV: The gender programming capacity of KAIPTC is enhanced; and the transitioning of the Women, Peace and Security Institute from the start-up to fully-operational phase is completed
Activities implemented during the programme start-up phase will include provision of ongoing strategic support by the programme management team to enhance the gender programming capacity of KAIPTC. Specifically, the programme team will provide technical advice to facilitate integration of a gender perspective in policy and programme priorities of KAIPTC, and will also help to shape the content and outcomes of debriefs and high level policy dialogues convened by KAIPTC. This support will also include technical inputs to inform the content of peacekeeping training activities organized by KAIPTC, as well as support to facilitate increased participation of women in the activities of the Centre.
To mark the transitioning of the Women, Peace and Security Institute from a start-up phase to a fully-operational phase, an official full-scale launch of the institute will be organized through an event that will bring together women leaders and key stakeholders from national, regional and international institutions as well as sponsors.
A wide-scale advocacy campaign will be initiated at the end of the start-up phase, as the Women Peace and Security Institute transitions into its second phase of operation. The advocacy campaign will have a region-wide scope in Africa and will aim to mobilize attention and support of key constituencies to the goals and objectives of the Institute, highlighting the status of African women’s participation in the peace and security sector. A range of advocacy tools will be developed to facilitate this campaign.

V Implementation Strategy
The work of the Women, Peace and Security Institute will be launched in two phases. The first will be a 24-month start-up phase whose objectives will be to: undertake baseline surveys on the 5 programme pillars of the Institute; develop an operational plan, course contents and mobilize financial resources to support the work of the Institute in the immediate to mid term; develop training modules and tools to facilitate implementation of the work plan of the Institute in Phase 2; establish partnership arrangements with key institutions in Africa and globally and; validate the programme priorities of the Institute identified in the start-up phase.
The objectives of Phase 2 of the Women Peace and Security Institute will be to implement a 5-year operational plan and a 2-year work plan which will commence upon completion of Phase 1. The activities of the second phase will include: provision of capacity-building and training services, including training to enhance women’s leadership in peace negotiations and in security sector institutions; convening of policy reviews and dialogue on gender, peace and security; training to enhance the capacity of African women’s organizations to address gender-based violence in conflict; maintaining and coordinating a knowledge platform of women’s contributions to peace processes; supporting mainstream institutions in Africa to integrate a gender perspective in their training and other programme activities and; supporting Member States to revise and adopt gender-sensitive security sector policies.
During the start-up phase, the programme management will be supported by UN agencies, and will be hosted at the Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training Centre (KAIPTC), which will provide the physical space and facilities to support the programme.



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