Encyclopedia



Download 8.16 Mb.
Page18/224
Date18.10.2016
Size8.16 Mb.
1   ...   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   ...   224
1776/08/05 John Cavenor ("John Caverner" & "John Cavender"?) enlisted in the Revolutionary War in the Troops for the colony of Maryland.412
1776/08/28 Patrick Cavanner ("Patrick Cavender") of Washington County, Maryland, believed to be a Catholic born in Ireland, was in the Company of Captain Griffith Johnson, and later served in the Company of John Eccleston in the 2nd. Maryland Regiment which was commanded by Col. Thomas Rice.319 & 412
1776/08/xx David Cavender deserted the Revolutionary War. 14
1776/09/30 Arther Cavender ("Arthur Cavender") of Delaware was listed as having the rank of corporal under Captain John Woodgate in Colonel Patterson's "Flying Camp" company which was commanded by Colonel Samuel Patterson and which was then located at Port Amboy. It was also noted that David Cavender had deserted on August 25, 1776. Arther Cavender and David Cavender were probably brothers. 269, 287 & 289
1776/11/17 William Cavender was born in Northumberland County, Virginia on this date to James Cavender and Susanna Cavender (“Susannah Cavender”? & “Susan Cavender”).393
1776/12/26 General Washington's troops won the battle of Trenton which was considered to be the turning point of the Revolutionary Way as more men began to volunteer as they saw the possibility of actually being able to win the war.
1776/12/xx James Cavender was listed as an officer on the payroll of Captain Enoch Anderson's company in the Delaware Regiment. He again listed as a Corporal in Anderson's Company on March 1, 1777, appointed Sergeant on January 1, 1778 and died April 17, 1778. In December of 1776, David Cavender was listed as having deserted. 289
1776 (1)Robert Callender ("Robert Cavender"?) was living in Transquakin Hundred, Dorchester County, Maryland in 1776, and his family consisted of 2 females under 10, 2 males 10-16, 1 male and 1 female 16-20, 1 female 30-40 and 1 male 40-50 (The actual census listing was 2 az, 2 bx, 1cx, 1cz, 1ez and 1fx, where: "a" means 10 years of age and under; "b" means 10 to 16; "c" means 16 to 21; "d" means 21 to 30; "e" means 30 to 40; "f" 40 to 50; "g" means 50 and upwards; "x" means males;"z" means females; and, "n" means "blacks".);

Thomas Cavender family was also living in Transquakin Hundred, Dorchester County, Maryland in 1776 and his family consisted of 1 male under 10, 1 female 16-21 and 1 male 21-30; 313, 321 & 412

David Cavender family was then living in the same Hundred in 1776 and his family then comprised himself, age 40-50, his wife age 40-50, and an older woman who apparently was the mother of one of them.393

(2) William Callendar ("William Callender"?, "William Callinder"?, "William Cavender"?) was living in Nantacoake Hundred in Dorchester County, Maryland in 1776. His family comprised 1 male 21-30 and 1 female 16-21. 321

(3) Charles Cavillare ("Charles Cavender"?) was then living in Town Hundred in Dorchester County, Maryland in 1776 and his family then comprised 2 men over 21 years of age and 1 slave; and,

Nathan Cavinder ("Nathan Cavender") was then living in the same Hundred in 1776 and his family then comprised 1 man over 21 years of age, a wife and 2 young children.

(4) John Cavender, son of Henry Cavender, was listed as a tithable in 1776 in the lower precinct of Westmoreland County, Virginia.113, 393 & 441

(5) Nathaniel Cavinder ("Nathaniel Cavender"?) over 21 was living in Town Hundred, Queen Anne's County, Maryland in 1776. 233 & 313

(6) David Cavender (believed by some to be the son of Dorset Cavender) was living in Transquakin Hundred in Dorchester County, Maryland according to the 1776 census. According to the 1776 census, his household at that particular time comprised: 1 female under 10, 1 male 10-16, 2 females 10-16, 1 male 30-40, 1 male 40-50, 1 female 40-50 and 1 female 50 and over years of age. 233, 274, 313, 322, 336, 392 & 412

(7) Thomas Cavender and his family were also living in Transquakin Hundred in Dorchester County, Maryland in 1776, and who may have been the married son of David Cavender above. The Thomas Cavender family at that time comprised 1 male under 10, 1 female 16-21 and 1 male 21-30 years of age. 233, 274, 313, 322 & 412

(8) A Nathaniel Cavinder ("Nathaniel Cavender"?) family was living in Town Hundred of Queen Ann's County, Maryland in 1776, which consisted of 1 male under 10, 1 female under 10, 2 females 21-30, 1 male 30-40, and 3 females 30-40. A second Nathaniel Cavinder (“Nathaniel Cavender”?) is also listed as then living in the same location and that the family at that particular time comprised 1 male and 1 female over 21, and 2 females under 12 years of age.274, 279, 336 & 392

(9) Thomas Cavender was living in Transquakin Hundred, Dorchester County, Maryland in 1776, and his family at that time consisted of 1 male under 11, 1 female 16-21 and 1 male 21-30. 313

(10 ) Samuel Cavender was then living in Transquakin Hundred in Dorchester County, Maryland in 1776, and his family then consisted of 2 males 10-16, 1 male 16-20, 1 male 40-50, 2 females under 10, 1 female 16-21, and 1 female 30-40. 279

(11) Stephen Cavender in Raleigh Parish in Amelia County, Virginia and believed to be the seventh born child of Hugh Cavender and Frances Cavender of Amelia County, Virginia and was born about 1776, and quite possibly a twin who married Elizabeth McCormack ("Elizabeth McCormick") in Davidson County, Tennessee, on December 30, 1805. In 1812, a Stephen Cavender was still living in Davidson County, Tennessee. 134 & 355

(12) John Cavender ("John Stephen Hugh Cavender"?, "Stephen Cavender" & "Hugh Cavender"?), the eighth and last born child of Hugh Cavender and Frances Cavender then living in Raleigh Parish in Amelia County, Virginia, is estimated to have been born in 1776, and quite possibly was a twin to the above Stephen Cavender.

This estimate is based on the fact that when John Cavender's widowed mother, Frances Cavender, died sometime in 1794, John Cavender, under the name of Hugh Cavender son of Hugh Cavender, was still a minor. And, under English common law observed in the 18th century in Virginia, any male 14 years of age (age 12 for females") could witness documents, testify in court, select their own guardian, serve as an apprentice, be punished for a crime, show land to processioners, sign contracts, act as an executor, and bequeath property by will; at age 16 for males, one could be listed as a tithable, be mustered into the militia, serve as processioners, and take possession of land holdings; at age 18 for males, one could be licensed to practice a trade; and, at age 21 for males (age 18 for females), at the time of marriage, one could release their guardian, be married without parental or guardian consent, plead or sue in court, own land, and be eligible for most public offices.

In fact, on December 1, 1794, Hugh Cavender, stated in a formal adoption paper filed in the court of Charlotte County, Virginia that he was an orphan of Hugh Cavender, and being of lawful age for the specific purpose of making his own choice, personally chose Thomas Chaffin to be his personal guardian, and who accordingly was appointed. Therefore, Hugh Cavender must have been 14-20 years of age to have been able to legally make that choice, and thus had to have been born between 1774-1780. Actually, he apparently was about 16 years of age at that particular time as the guardianship apparently ended in September 1797 when the guardian filed a full accounting with the court, apparently because this second Hugh Cavender had just become 21 years of age and thus born about 1776. As the youngest son of Hugh Cavender and Frances Cavender was named as merely John Cavender in his father's will, and as his date of birth is estimated to have been about 1776, it appears clear that the full name of Hugh Cavender's youngest child was either "John Hugh Cavender" or "Hugh John Cavender", but that he was normally called by the name of "John Cavender" as his father was called by the name of Hugh Cavender, but for some unknown reason he used the name of "Hugh Cavender" in the particular formal papers regarding the appointment of his legal guardian papers which were filed after his father and mother had both died and he was still legally regarded as a minor, i.e., under the age of 21.393 On September 2, 1805 John Cavender ("Hugh Cavender") was living in Charlotte County, Virginia, when he sold to William Blake, Jr., of Charlotte County 75 acres of land in Charlotte County which he previously inherited from his father, Hugh Cavender. The land was bounded by the farms of William Blake, Sr., James Elmore and Hezekiah Featherston.50

(12) Washington District, by request of the settlers, is annexed to North Carolina and becomes Washington County, North Carolina with boundaries of the present state of Tennessee.

1777/02/03 (1) Samuel Cavendar ("Samuel Cavender"?) was born on this date to Robert

Cavendar ("Robert Cavender"?) and Sarah Cavendar ("Sarah Cavender"?) in Sussex County, Delaware. 397

(2) Joseph Carvender ("Joseph Cavender"?) was listed as then being in the

Company of Captain Cory, as being one of the men who enlisted during three



years and the war, and as having being mustered and paid the bounty in a report by James Barret, Esq. to the Honorable Council for the State of Nassachusetts Bay. Jas Barnett Returns, Oct 1896, pp476
1777/02/23 David Cavender was a witness of the will of George Smith of Sussex County, Delaware.313, 336 & 355
1777/03/01 John Cavender enlisted in the 15th Virginia Regiment from Amelia County, Virginia.313 & 393
1777/03/18 Joseph Cavender enlisted in the 11th. Virginia Regiment from Amelia County, Virginia
1777/04/xx The Last Will and Testament of William Cavenaugh ("William Cavender") was probated in St. Mary's County, Maryland.374
1777/05/27 James Cavender enlisted in the Revolutionary War in Delaware, promoted to Corporal on March 1, 1777, promoted to Sergeant on January 1, 1778, and died April 17, 1778. 313
1777/06/23 Joseph Carvender ("Joseph Cavender"?) was mustered and was paid bounty in Capt. Cory's Company for the State of Nassachusetts Bay. He is not believed to be the son of Hugh Cavender of Virginia, but is believed to be a second soldier named Joseph Cavender who enlisted in Massachusetts on May 4, 1775 and received Bounty Warrant #2719. 13, 14, 73, 77, 226, 276 & 284
1777/08/xx John Cavender of New Castle County, Delaware enlisted as a teenager into the service of the Revolutionary War. He probably was the one who served in a Calvary regiment. 285
1777/09/09 General Washington's troops lost the battle of Brandywine and on October 5, 1777, lost the battle of Germantown and then retired to Valley Forge for the winter.164
1777/09/27 John Ford, Jr. and Frankey Ford, his wife, of Amelia County, Virginia sold to Ambrose Jeter ("Ambrose Jetter"?) of Caroline County, Virginia for 625 pounds 500 acres in Amelia County on both sides of Stocks Creek and adjacent to the lands of William Ford, Jr., James Wingoe ("James Wingo"), Hugh Cavender, William Lovern ("William Loving"?), John Wright and John Wood, being the place where John Ford, Jr. now lives, with all buildings, woods, etc. The indenture was witnessed by Edmund Booker ("Edmond Booker"), Thomas Mumford, William Ford, Jr., Mack Goode and John Mann.DB14/98
1777/09/xx William Cavender apparently joined Goodman's Company in North Carolina, took "time out" on October 31, 1777, reenlisted May 25, 1781 in Brewards Company ("Brevards Company") and left the service on May 25, 1782 and apparently drew a pension No. 90373. A James Cavender drew a pension No. 90386 for his service in the Revolutionary War. He also left Brevards Company ("Brewards Company") on May 25, 1782. On May 1, 1792, an entry was made in the Account of Allowances made for officers and soldiers of the late Continental line of North Carolina by the Commissioner of Army Accounts regarding a William Cavender. Note that apparently a second William Cavender likewise enlisted in the Revolutionary War from North Carolina around this same time and later married Margaret Cox, the daughter of George Cox who was killed in the Revolutionary War. 355
1777/10/17 David Cavender was a witness of the will of Robert Wallace in Sussex County, Delaware. 131
1777/12/26 Joseph Corvender ("Joseph Cavender") of Westminster, Massachusetts, enlisted or was drafted to serve in the Continental Army in Capt. Morse's Company.284
1777/12/19 Washington's army begin winter at Valley Forge. 164
1777/xx/xx John Ford and Frankey Ford sold land in Raliegh Parish ("Raleigh Parish") in Amelia County, Virginia to Ambrose Jeter of Caroline County, Virginia, which land was adjacent to the lands of Hugh Cavender, Mack Goode, and others.393
1777-1780 David Cavender sold to Richard Sprigg a tract of land located in Dorchester County, Maryland.302
1777 (1) A James Cavender was then paying taxes in the St. Lawrence District,418 Caswell County, North Carolina.

(2) In 1777 Fincastle County, Virginia's General Assembly divided Fincastle County into three parts and created Washington, Montgomery, and Kentucky Counties. The act creating these counties described Kentucky County as being "to the south and westward of a line beginning on the Ohio at the mouth of Great Sandy creek and running up the same and the main, or northeasterly, branch thereof to the Great Laurel Ridge of Cumberland Mountain, then south westerly along the said mountain to the line of North Carolina." In 1780, Kentucky County was divided into three counties -- Jefferson, Fayette, and Lincoln. Within just a few years, six more counties had been carved out of those three. Between 1784 and 1792, people living in those counties held ten conventions on the question of statehood; on 18 December 1789 Virginia's General Assembly passed an act allowing Kentucky to apply for statehood and on 1 June 1792, those nine counties became a state, with the full consent of Virginia.Provided by Va. St. Lbry.



1778/01/27 Moses Euldaley ("Moses Youdaley"), believed to be the brother-in-law of Hugh Cavender and living in Raleigh Parish in Amelia County, Virginia, witnessed the deed of Joseph Jackson with respect to land located on Sandy Creek in Amelia County, Virginia. Sometime after 1780, all members of the Eudaley ("Youdaley") family moved to Charlotte County, Virginia where they remained in close association with Hugh Cavender.393
1778/02/17 The British Parliament adopted a "Conciliatory Bill" offering to give the American Colonies everything they had demanded, except independence.
1778/02/xx James Cavender was listed in Captain Enoch Andersons Company in the D Regiment commanded by Captain David Hall in Delaware.289
1778/02/18 John Cavender of Princess Anne County, Virginia (which now in the independent City/County of Virginia Beach, Virginia), apparently purchased from William Capps of Princess Anne County 8 acres of land and buildings in the Muddy Creek Neck section of Princess Annee County, which is adjacent to the place of residence of William Capps.193
1778/03/09 Henry Burge of Nottoway Parish, Amelia County, Virginia sold to William Crenshaw, Jr. of the same county and parish for 475 pounds 180 acres in Nottoway Parish adjacent to the lines of Stith Hardaway, Henry Beuford, and an Irby, and the Long Branch. The indenture was witnessed by Peter Lamkin, David Crenshaw, John Anderson, James Crenshaw and John May. DB14/101
1778/03/10 Court deposition in Dorchester County, Maryland of David Cavender, then aged around 52 years, who was testifying about a poplar tree shown to him about 15 years ago by his brother, Charles Cavender, as a boundary between Rev. Thomas Airey's land and the land where Charles Cavender lived.286 & 352
1778/04/17 Date of decease of James Cavender of Delaware who was killed in the Revolutionary War while serving in Enoch Anderson's Company, and who is believed to be the son of Dorset Cavender. 269, 279 & 131
1778/04/23 William Ware and Ann Ware, his wife, of Amelia County, Virginia sold to William Griffin of Prince Edward County, Virginia for 150 pounds 100 acres in Raleigh Parish of Amelia County, Virginia adjacent to Little Sandy Creek, the fence of John Wright, the line of William Winston, and the creek as it meanders.DB14/101
1778/05/20 John Sims Cavender (“John Cavender” & “J.S. Cavender”) was born on this date to James Cavender and Susanna Cavender (“Susan Cavender”, “Susannah Cavender”) in Northumberland County, Virginia.393
1778/06/22 David Cavender, planter, and his wife, Elizabeth Cavender of Dorchester County, Maryland sold to Richard Sprigg of Anne Arundel County, Maryland, sold 30 acres of land in Dorchester County, Maryland. The land was known as "Haywards Lott" and "John's Choice". The deed was signed by David Cavender and his wife Elizabeth Cavender. 286 & 352
1778/09/10 William Samsum and his wife, Sarah Samsum, sold 100 acres of land on Spring Creek in Lunenburg County, Virginia, to Joseph Townsend which was bounded by the lands of Jared McConnico and John Crafton. Both Jared McConnico and John Crafton later moved to Williamson County, Tennessee. 111 & 125
1778 (1) Estimated date of births of Amen Cavender (“Amy Cavender” & “Amey Cavender”?) who married Tally Whiteherst (“Tully Whitehurst”?) in Princess Anne County, Virginia (which now in the independent City/County of Virginia Beach, Virginia), and Rebecca Cavender who married James Absolam (“James Absalom”? & “James Absolom”?) in Princess Anne County on September 19, 1806, with the ceremony being conducted by Jeremiah Reitter. 149

(2) John Cavender took an Oath of Fidelity in Cecil County, Maryland. 313 & 336



(3) Private Lambert Cavender from Kent County, Maryland 1778 was in the 13th Battalion, 6th Company under Captain Richard Gresham. Samuel Cavender ("Cavendar") of Kent County, Maryland, was in the 6th Company under Captain David Crane on the same date. Patrick Cavanner ("Patrick Cavender"?) from Washington County, Maryland and believed to be a Catholic born in Ireland, likewise served in the Revolutionary War under Capt. Griffith Johnson in 1778.316, 318 & 323
1779/02/24William Ware of Amelia County, Virginia sold to Mack Goode ("Mack Good"?) of the same county for 800 pounds 215 acres of land on both sides of Stocks Creek in Raliegh Parish ("Raleigh Parish") in Amelia County, Virginia where William Ware then lived, which land was adjacent to that of John Green, William Crowder, John Wood and Hugh Cavender. The indenture was witnessed by Thomas Green, John Taylor, Joseph Pollard with his mark, and Martha Caskin with her mark. As there was no release of dower, William Ware was then either divorced or a widower.393 & DB15/10
1779/04/23 John Compton, Jr. of Amelia County, Virginia sold to John Tabb of the same county 100 acres of land in Amelia county whereon the late father of John Compton, John Compton, Sr., lived. The land is adjacent to the lines of Joseph Eggleston, William Hutchason ("William Hutchinson"?), John Compton and John Tabb. The indenture was witnessed by Thomas Tabb, John White and Williamson Piles. Note that a John White married Nancy Cavender on March 4, 1796 in Dorchester County, Maryland. DB15/27
1779/05/10 A petition for relief was filed in the county court of Northumberland County, Virginia by Susanna Cavender (“Susan Cavender” & “Susannah Cavender”), the wife of James Caviner (“James Cavender”) who was then serving in the Continental Army. She was awarded the sum of 50 pounds. A James Cavender drew a pension No. 90386 for his service in the Revolutionary War. 393
1779/05/13 John Cavendar ("John Cavender"?) and his wife, Susanna Cavender (“Susan Cavender” & “Susannah Cavender”), of Princess Anne County, Virginia (which now in the independent City/County of Virginia Beach, Virginia), sold to William Williams of Princess Anne County 8 acres of land in Muddy Creek Neck in Princess Anne County. The Indenture was witnessed by Reuben Williamson, Tully Capps and Elizabeth Wilbour (“Elizabeth Wilbur”?). This particular John Cavender may have been the son of the Henry Cavender of Westmoreland County, Virginia.15
1779/05/19 Mack Goode of Amelia County, Virginia sold to William Ware of the same County for 800 pounds 155 acres in Raleigh Parish of Amelia County, Virginia on both sides of Stocks Creek adjacent to the lines of Hugh Cavender, John Wood, William Crowder and John Green. The indenture was witnessed by John Taylor, Mat. McGlasson ("Matthew McGlasson"?) and Thomas Green. Approximately one month later, on June 24, 1779, William Ware sold the same property to David Asselin of the same county and parish for 1000 pounds. This particular indenture was witnessed by William Giles, John Booker and T.B. Wison (T.B. Wilson”?). DB15/17
1779/06/21 Spain declares war on Great Britain.
1779/06/24 William Ware of Amelia County, Virginia sold to David Asselin of the same county for 1,000 pounds a 155 acre tract of land located in Amelia County, Virginia on both sides of Stocks Creek adjacent to the lines of William Crowder, John Wood, Hugh Cavender and John Green. Witnessed by William Giles, John Booker and T.B. Wilson.441
1779/10/20 Ezekiel Cavender purchased from Robertson Stephens and his wife Jannet Stephens (“Janet Stephens”) 73 acres of land in Dorchester County, Maryland, known as either "Newport" or “New Port” and which was located on the east side of the Northwest Fork of the Nanticoke River. This particular Ezekiel Cavender is believed to be the son of Dorset Cavender who died about 1738 in Dorset County, Maryland.286
1779/10/20 Ezekiel Cavender purchased from Robert Stephens and his wife, Jannet Stephens (“Janet Stephens”?), 73 acres of land known as "New Port" ("Newport") on the east side of the Northwest fork of Nanticoke River in Dorchester County, Maryland. On the same day, Ezekiel Cavender and his wife, Nancy Cavender, sold to Robert Stephens 85 acres of land in Dorchester County, Maryland, which was part of a tract known as "Ezekiel's Fortune" which was located on the east side of the Northwest Fork of the Nanticoke River in Dorchester County, Maryland. This particular Ezekiel Cavender is believed to be the son of Dorset Cavender who died about 1738 in Dorset County, Maryland.286 & 352
1779/11/22 Henry Cavender married Mary Laggett (“Mary Leggett”, “Moley Leggett” & “Molly Leggett”) in Princess Anne County, Virginia on this date with James Leggett giving his consent, S. Mills and Frances Leggett were the witnesses, and Edward Cannon, Jr. and Henry Cavender were the sureties. On August 7, 1780, Henry Cavender and Mary Cavender (formerly “Mary Leggett”) witnessed the consent of James Leggett for his daughter, Frances Leggett, to marry John Petree (“John Petre”), with the surety being Enoch Jones.

See the Last Will and Testament of James Leggett which was executed in Princess Anne County, Virginia on November 21, 1812 and probated in Princess Anne County, Virginia on May 3, 1813 where he bequests to: his son Robert Leggett, Enoch Leggett, Edward Digs (“Edward Diggs”?), daughter Amey Whitehurst (“Amy Whitehurst”), his granddaughter Elizabeth Woods, Robert Leggett’s daughters Anne Leggett and Alsey Leggett, to his daughter Moley Cavender (“Molly Cavender”, “Polly Cavender” & “Mary Cavender”, formerly Moley Leggett (“Molly Leggett”, Polly Leggett & Mary Leggett”) who married Henry Cavender. Note that an orphan named Enoch Leggett chose Robert Jones as his guardian.


Download 8.16 Mb.

Share with your friends:
1   ...   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   ...   224




The database is protected by copyright ©ininet.org 2020
send message

    Main page