Extended learning modules language Arts/Reading



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EXTENDED LEARNING MODULES
Language Arts/Reading


7th GRADE

Student Packet

TUTORING SESSION 8

Benchmark Focus Lesson:

LA.7.1.6.8- Word Phrases and Word Relationships

LA.7.2.1.7- Figurative and Descriptive Language

FCAT Instructional Passage:

Into the Eye of the Storm


NAME: ___________________________
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Perla Tabares Hantman, Chair

Dr. Martin Karp, Vice Chair

Dr. Dorothy Bendross-Mindingall

Susie V. Castillo

Carlos L. Curbelo

Dr. Lawrence S. Feldman

Dr. Wilbert “Tee” Holloway

Dr. Marta Pérez

Raquel A. Regalado

Jude Bruno

Student Advisor





Alberto M. Carvalho

Superintendent of Schools




Milagros R. Fornell

Chief Academic Officer

Office of Academics and Transformation
Marie L. Izquierdo

Assistant Superintendent

Academics, Accountability and School Improvement

Office of Academics and Transformation


Karen Spigler

Administrative Director

Department of Language Arts/Reading

Benchmark Focus Lesson 1: Word Phrases and Relationships

LA.6-8.1.6.8 The student will identify advanced word/phrase relationships and their meanings.


Word Relationships

Do you know what an analogy is? It is a comparison. An analogy shows that a relationship between one pair of words is similar to the relationship between another pair. For example, the relationship between big and large is similar to the relationship between small and tiny because both pairs are synonyms. The comparison can be expressed with words or with dots. The dots stand for the words is to and as.


Big is to large as small is to tiny big : large :: small : tiny
Analogies can show many different relationships in addition to showing synonyms. Some additional relationships can be found in the chart below.

Opposites

summer : winter :: hot : cold

Cause and Effect

Ice : slip :: sun : burst

Categories

Canary : bird :: poodle : dog

Part-to-Whole

Branch : tree :: nose : face

Read this paragraph about tarantulas. Look for an analogy.




If you are a mouse, you want to stay out of the way of a tarantula. That’s because a tarantula is to a mouse as a fox is to a chicken. A tarantula comes out at night to hunt. Because it has poor vision, a tarantula searches for its victims by touch. When a tarantula finds a tasty meal, it bites its victim and releases paralyzing venom with its large fangs. A tarantula’s bite is not deadly to humans, but it does hurt.

Write a cause and effect analogy you found in the paragraph.

On the 1st line, write the word that completes the analogy. Then, on the 2nd line, identify the kind of analogy you have completed.

1. sleeves: shirt:: wings : ______________ _____________

engine airplane clothes

2. sweater: clothing:: dictionary : _______________ _______________

book library store

3. sweet: sour:: soft : _________________ ________________

tart sugary hard



Benchmark Focus Lesson 2: Figurative and Descriptive Language

LA.6-8.2.1.7 The student will locate and analyze an author’s use of allusions and descriptive, idiomatic, and figurative language in a variety of literary text…


Using Figurative Language

We call expressions that can’t be understood from the usual, everyday definitions of their words figurative language. Writers often use such expressions to give a clearer picture of what they mean. There are several types of figurative language.



Type of Language

Definition

Example

Simile

A comparison of unlike things using words such as like or as

Young Hercules wrestled like a lion cub.

Metaphor

A comparison of unlike things without any words of comparison

With his muscles of iron, Hercules defeated each enemy.

Idiom

A phrase that cannot be understood using ordinary definitions

He refused to back down from his enemies.

Personification

Giving human characteristics to animals or things

The golden apples winked in the sunlight.

Hyperbole

An exaggeration that is used for emphasis

Hercules was so hungry he could eat a horse.

Read the following Greek myth. Notice how descriptive expressions help create a picture.
Hera, the queen of the gods, was jealous of the mighty Hercules. She forced Hercules to serve a wicked king. To win his freedom, Hercules had to perform 12 difficult tasks called labors.
Task eleven was for Hercules to collect some golden apples as bright as the sun. Near the apple orchard, Hercules found Atlas, a giant who supported the heavy sky on his shoulders. “I’ll get the apples for you,” Atlas said, “but you must hold up the sky.”
Hercules suspected that Atlas had a trick up his sleeve. When Atlas had fetched the apples, Hercules said, “Take the sky back for a moment while I make a cushion for my shoulder.” As Atlas took back the sky, Hercules picked up the apples and ran away at lightning speed.
In the passage above, find examples of the following types of figurative language and write them on the lines provided.

Simile: ________________________________________________________________

Idiom: ________________________________________________________________

Hyperbole: ____________________________________________________________



Anticipation Guide for

Into the Eye of the Storm”



Directions: On the line in front of each of the numbers, place an "x" that indicates where you stand in regard to the statement that follows. Be prepared to defend and support your opinions with specific examples. After reading the text, compare your opinions on those statements with the author's implied and/or stated messages.

Agree         Disagree      

                         

_____________________ 1.  Information gathered from satellites and from Hurricane Hunters is so similar, it is often used interchangeably.

_____________________ 2.  Scientists started to study hurricanes because they wanted to avoid the death and damage caused by unexpected storms along the coasts.

_____________________ 3.  Two Hurricane Hunter planes, flying at different altitudes inside a hurricane will often confirm that their readings are the same at both the higher and the lower portions of the storm.

_____________________ 4.  Since we have better storm prediction techniques now, many people can better prepare their homes to withstand a high intensity hurricane.

_____________________5.  Because all hurricanes rotate in the same pattern, they are often the same in wind strength and the amount of rain they carry.

______________________6.  Scientists do not know why hurricanes form, so predicting they travel paths is especially difficult.


During Reading – Two Column Notes

Into the Eye of the Storm”




The chart below provides causes and effects. As you read the passage that follows, write in the effect for each cause that is given; and for each effect that is given, write in the cause.


Cause

Effect




Hurricane Hunters fly into the eyes of hurricanes.



Col. Joseph Duckworth had taught pilots how to fly through bad weather during WWII.






A hurricane had caused a great deal of damage in 1938 when it came ashore with no warning.









The National Hurricane Center has received information by satellite.



No hurricane can approach the shoreline of the United States without sufficient warning.









Into the Eye of the Storm

They fly into the eye of a hurricane. Who are these people? Why would they do such a thing? They are “Hurricane Hunters.” Even the most advanced satellites today cannot provide all the facts the National Hurricane Center forecasters need to predict when and where a hurricane will strike. Information is also needed to predict how powerful the storm will be. Satellites today can estimate the strength of a hurricane, but these numbers are not accurate enough. What is at first classified as a Category 2 hurricane may actually be determined to be a dangerous Category 3 after more information is gathered.


In 1943 Colonel Joseph Duckworth became the first pilot to fly into the eye of a hurricane on purpose. He flew into a hurricane over land near Houston, Texas, on July 27, 1943. He had been an airline pilot who taught Army Air Corps pilots how to fly through bad weather during World War II. He taught pilots how to reduce risk by using their skill, their knowledge, and careful planning.
Duckworth’s success flying through the hurricanes and the damage done to Navy ships by incorrectly forecasted hurricanes persuaded the military to begin studying hurricanes. These studies collected useful information. The program’s first accomplishment came with “The Great Atlantic Hurricane of 1944.” At this time Navy and Army planes tracked the storm from Puerto Rico to New England. A similar storm with the same track had caused a great deal of damage in 1938 when it came ashore with no warning. The forecast information that came from these military flights was used to reduce all types of destruction in the path of the 1944 hurricane.
Today the “Hurricane Hunters” are members of the 53rd Weather Investigation Squadron of the Air Force Reserve. They are based at Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi, Mississippi. There is a six-person crew on each flight. It includes the pilot, the co-pilot, the flight engineer, the navigator, and the weather officer. There is also a dropsonde system operator. The dropsonde system operator releases the dropsonde, which is a weather-sensing canister attached to a small parachute. The canister can send back to the plane information about the temperature, humidity, pressure, and winds inside the hurricane. This information is then transferred to the National Hurricane Center by satellite.
When the National Hurricane Center in Miami determines that a hurricane is approaching the United States, the “Hurricane Hunters” take off in two planes. One of the WC-130 planes will enter the hurricane close to the sea surface. The other plane will fly much higher into the storm. As the storm builds in strength, the planes will fly at increasingly higher altitudes. These planes are designed to withstand takeoffs, landings, and high altitude winds up to 200 miles per hour.
Their goal is not to fly over or around the hurricane but to fly directly into it. Each mission will last about ten hours. During this time the crew will fly from the outer edge all the way through the eye wall, which is a solid ring of thunderstorms. The crew will fly to the eye, or center of the storm, four to six times. All the while, radar, computers, and weather instruments will collect valuable information inside the hurricane. This information cannot be attained any other way. The knowledge will inform weather forecasters where the hurricane is going, when it will get there, and how strong it will be.
One day a plane with no pilot, such as the Aerosonde, may take the place of the “Hurricane Hunters.” Until then, no hurricane can approach the shoreline of the United States without sufficient warning because of the skill and dedication of the “Hurricane Hunters.”
____ 1. Why is the information from a “Hurricane Hunter’s” flight better than the information from satellite images?


A.

It is more precise.

B.

It is more current.

C.

It involves less human error.

D.

It is less expensive to acquire.



____ 2. How did the 1944 hurricane differ from the storm in 1938?


F.

The 1938 storm was tracked with military airplanes.

G.

Forecasters used planes to help collect information about the 1944 storm.

H.

The 1944 storm caused more serious damage because nobody saw it coming.

J.

New computers and weather instruments collected storm information in 1938.

..
____ 3. All of these weather conditions are measured by the dropsonde system EXCEPT


A.

humidity.

B.

pressure.

C.

rainfall.

D.

temperature.



____ 4. Read these sentences.
The program’s first accomplishment came with “The Great Atlantic Hurricane of 1944.” At this time Navy and Army planes tracked the storm from Puerto Rico to New England. A similar storm with the same track had caused a great deal of damage in 1938 when it came ashore with no warning.
Why does the author include this comparison in the passage?


F.

to show the bravery that 1944’s “Hurricane Hunters” showed

G.

to discourage average people from staying in a hurricane’s path

H.

to emphasize the benefit of forecast information from military flights

J.

to illustrate how the “Hurricane Hunters’” technology has not changed



____ 5. Read these sentences.
One of the WC-130 planes will enter the hurricane close to the sea surface. The other plane will fly much higher into the storm.
Why does the author include this contrast in the passage?


A.

to emphasize that the crew of the WC-130 is extremely brave

B.

to show how both planes are vital to the hurricane forescasting process

C.

to explain how the missions for both planes have become less dangerous

D.

to illustrate that these planes will soon be replaced by planes with no pilots



____ 6. The damage of a hurricane is MOST LIKELY lessened by the fact that



F.

there is a six-person crew on each “Hurricane Hunter” flight.

G.

each hurricane tracking mission takes at least ten hours to complete.

H.

forecasters now have the information needed to predict when and where a hurricane will strike.

J.

the members of the 53rd Weather Investigation Squadron of the Air Force Reserve are based along the Gulf Coast.



____ 7. The military began flying into hurricanes because


A.

the Aerosonde did not provide accurate enough information about conditions inside hurricanes.

B.

Navy and Army planes were already being used to track storms from Puerto Rico to New England.

C.

Colonel Joseph Duckworth had been an airline pilot and he had served in the Army Air Corps.

D.

storms had damaged Navy ships and Colonel Duckworth had made a successful flight through a hurricane.

Writing - Compare and Contrast
The last paragraph of the passage states:

One day a plane with no pilot, such as the Aerosonde, may take the place of the “Hurricane Hunters.” Until then, no hurricane can approach the shoreline of the United States without sufficient warning because of the skill and dedication of the “Hurricane Hunters.”


Students, imagine the Aerosonde has recently been developed and will be in use during next hurricane season. How will it differ from the planes currently used by Hurricane Hunters? In what ways will it be the same? Create a Venn diagram to organize your ideas, then write two paragraphs describing the differences and similarities between the new and old planes. A third paragraph may be added to describe your opinions of which of the two planes would be more effective and efficient.
Share your writings with classmates.

Writing Component: Expository

The writing section of this lesson is a continuation from last week’s lesson. Students will continue to work with their first draft of the essay. The prompt remains the same.



What is your favorite form of transportation-a bus, a car, a skateboard, the subway, or something else? Think about the form of transportation you like best. Now write to explain what makes this form of transportation your favorite.

Using the ideas about focus and organization generated during last week’s session, student will revise and rewrite the first draft of this essay.














































































ANTI-DISCRIMINATION POLICY

Federal and State Laws
The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida adheres to a policy of nondiscrimination in employment and educational programs/activities and strives affirmatively to provide equal opportunity for all as required by law:

Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 - prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, or national origin.

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended - prohibits discrimination in employment on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, or national origin.

Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 - prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender.

Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA), as amended - prohibits discrimination on the basis of age with respect to individuals who are at least 40.

The Equal Pay Act of 1963, as amended - prohibits gender discrimination in payment of wages to women and men performing substantially equal work in the same establishment.

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 - prohibits discrimination against the disabled.

Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) - prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in employment, public service, public accommodations and telecommunications.

The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA) - requires covered employers to provide up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave to “eligible” employees for certain family and medical reasons.

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 - prohibits discrimination in employment on the basis of pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions.

Florida Educational Equity Act (FEEA) - prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, gender, national origin, marital status, or handicap against a student or employee.

Florida Civil Rights Act of 1992 - secures for all individuals within the state freedom from discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, handicap, or marital status.

Veterans are provided re-employment rights in accordance with P.L. 93-508 (Federal Law) and Section 295.07 (Florida Statutes), which stipulates categorical preferences for employment.





Office of Academics and Transformation

2012-2013




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