Framework curricula for primary education



Download 2 Mb.
Page14/31
Date29.01.2017
Size2 Mb.
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   31

Foreign Language

Years 5 through 8 of Education


Objectives and tasks
When starting year five, all pupils have been studying a foreign language for (at least) one year. They can understand the teacher’s questions and instructions in class, they are familiar with the types of exercises and in-class activities, they are motivated, have self- confidence, and are already capable of using some strategies.

One of the main priorities in these four years is to maintain pupil’s level of motivation, and to make sure children experience success through meaningful work. The development of receptive skills (understanding spoken and written language) remains a central task, as receptive skills contribute to the development of productive skills (speaking and writing) indirectly. Fluency should receive an increasing emphasis as children move into higher grades. An important goal of education is to develop pupils’ need for reading in the target language by making them read interesting, abridged or original, illustrated longer texts.

The topics cover the content of other subjects in the curriculum, as language use is not an end in itself. The purpose of language use is obtaining and processing information. The objectives listed in the curriculum help making the syllabus of foreign language teaching easier to understand, but contents should be used with another organisation, taking a different approach, otherwise they may become boring.

A 10 to 14 year old language learner relies more on their memory than the system of rules in the target language, but children’s ability to perceive regularity is increasing at this age. On the other hand, the knowledge of the rules adds only little value to the progress they make. In terms of language use, the strength of this age group is fluency as opposed to correctness, but it is also necessary to make the use of the most important structures automatic. The aim is to make pupils able o notice and correct their own mistakes themselves. This will help them become an autonomous language learner.

During these four years of education, pupils should acquire learning strategies on a level which will make them able to exploit exposure to the foreign language outside the classroom (e.g. films, music, TV programmes, newspapers and allow supervised progress.

By the end of Grade 8, the level of measurable proficiency should allow the understanding and production of information about familiar topics in the foreign language. At this age children should be able to participate in interactions successfully.


Developmental requirements
Pupils can understand and produce information in the target language and participate in interaction efficiently. They can co-operate with the teacher and their peers in the classroom, in exercises in the target language. They are clear about the domains of foreign language learning (speaking, reading, vocabulary, etc.). They have developed a language learning strategy which may be improved further. They try to make use of their exposure to the foreign language outside the classroom (TV programmes, newspapers, etc.) in order to make progress themselves.


List of (suggested) topics:

  • Me and my family: personal particulars, occupations, household duties, family occasions.

  • Personal relations: friendship, people’s appearance and inner qualities.

  • Our wider environment: village, small town, metropolis; describing the place of living; protecting the place where we live.

  • Our natural environment: nature conservation; famous regions in the Earth; endangered plants and animals;

  • School life: describing the school, the ideal timetable, the ideal school.

  • Health and illness: frequent diseases and common injuries.

  • Food and meals: eating habits in Hungary and in other countries; special dishes and recipes; table manners.

  • Shopping: daily shopping; buying presents in the holiday seasons.

  • Travelling: preparing for a journey; your favourite means of transport.

  • Leisure activities and entertainment: sport at school and outside school; video, computer and reading.

Year 5
Number of teaching hours per year: 111


Content
The language specific requirements related to communicative intentions and concepts can be found in the Framework Curriculum broken down into six different languages and two years.*
Communicative intentions

(see Framework Curriculum for Year 6)


Concepts

(see Framework Curriculum for Year 6)



Prerequisites of moving ahead
Listening skill

Pupils can



  • Understand requests and instructions expressed with familiar devices, and give a physical response in the form of actions;

  • Understand questions containing known linguistic devices;

  • Derive important information from a text with simple sentences and known linguistic devices;


Speaking skills

Pupils can



  • Answer to questions containing known linguistic devices in a simple sentence;

  • Make statements and ask questions in simple sentences reproducing a learnt example;

  • Ask for help in case of problems with understanding;


Reading skills: understanding texts

Pupils can



  • Read a text made up of sentences with a few words and familiar linguistic devices;

  • Scan a text containing known linguistic devices for important information;

  • Understand the main points of a text containing known linguistic devices.


Writing skills

Pupils can



  • Write down short sentences containing known linguistic devices correctly;

  • Express simple messages in written form on the basis of a presented example.

Year 6
Number of teaching hours per year: 111


Content
The language specific requirements related to communicative intentions and concepts can be found in the Framework Curriculum broken down into six different languages and two years.
Communicative intentions
Communicative intentions used in social interaction:

  • addressing people;

  • greetings and saying goodbye;

  • expressing thanks and responding to expression of thanks;

  • introductions

  • enquiry about how others are, and responses to similar enquiries;

  • apologising and responding to apologies;

  • congratulations, greetings and responding to congratulations and greetings.



Expressing personal attitude and opinion:

  • expressing and asking opinions and responding to that;

  • admitting or not admitting that somebody is right;

  • agreeing, disagreeing,

  • approval and disapproval.


Communicative intentions related to the exchange of information:

  • naming and describing objects and persons;

  • asking and giving information;

  • affirmative and negative answers;

  • knowledge and ignorance.


Influencing partner's actions:

  • request;

  • suggestion and responding to suggestions;

  • invitation and accepting/declining invitations;

  • offering and responding to offers.


Communicative intentions appearing in interaction:

  • backtracking;

  • expressing lack of understanding;

  • request for spelling, spelling.


Concepts:

  • Expressing actions, events or existence.

  • Expressing possession.

  • Spatial relations;

  • Chronological relations.

  • Quantitative relations;

  • Qualitative relations.

  • Modality;

  • Case structure.

  • Logical relations.

  • Cohesive devices.



Prerequisites of moving ahead
Listening skills

Pupils can



  • Understand instructions and respond in actions;

  • Understand questions and statements largely containing known linguistic devices;

  • Derive important information from a text largely containing known linguistic devices;

  • Understand the essence of a text with simple sentences containing largely known linguistic


Speaking skills

Pupils can



  • Give simple. structured answers to a question largely containing known linguistic devices;

  • Make statements in simple sentences based on learnt patterns;

  • Ask questions;

  • Ask for help in case of problems with understanding;

  • Participate in a simple conversation based on learnt patterns.


Reading skills: understanding texts

Pupils can



  • Read simple sentences with familiar linguistic devices;

  • Scan a text largely containing known linguistic devices for important information;

  • Understand the main points of a text with simple sentences containing known linguistic devices.


Writing skills

Pupils can



  • Write down a text containing known linguistic devices correctly;

  • Formulate simple written statements and questions based on learnt patterns;

  • Create a simple, structured text (informal message, greeting).

Year 7
Number of teaching hours per year: 111


Content
The language specific requirements related to communicative intentions and concepts can be found in the Framework Curriculum broken down into six different languages and two years.
Communicative intentions

(see Framework Curriculum for Year 8)


Concepts

(see Framework Curriculum for Year 8)



Prerequisites of moving ahead
Listening skills

Pupils can



  • Understand instructions and respond in actions;

  • Understand requests, questions, statements and events with known linguistic devices;

  • Derive important information from a text largely containing known linguistic devices;

  • Understand the essence of a text with simple sentences containing largely known linguistic devices; extrapolate the meaning of an unknown language component from a text largely containing known linguistic devices.


Speaking skills

Pupils can



  • Answer a question largely containing known linguistic devices with simple, structured sentences;

  • Make statements with simple sentences;

  • Ask questions;

  • Relate events;

  • Ask for help in case of problems with understanding;

  • Participate in a simple conversation;

  • Initiate and conclude a conversation.


Reading skills: understanding texts

Pupils can



  • Read a text made with familiar linguistic devices;

  • Scan a text largely containing known linguistic devices for important information;

  • Understand the main points of a text containing known linguistic devices;

  • Understand the main points of a text made up of simple sentences containing known linguistic devices;

  • Understand a simple story illustrated with pictures;

  • Extrapolate the meaning of unknown language components in a text largely containing known linguistic devices.


Writing skills

Pupils can



  • Write down a text containing known linguistic devices correctly;

  • Formulate simple written statements and questions;

  • Create a simple, structured text (informal message, greeting).

  • Write an informative text using familiar structures.

Year 8
Number of teaching hours per year: 111


Content
The language specific requirements related to communicative intentions and concepts can be found in the Framework Curriculum broken down into six different languages and two years.
Communicative intentions
Communicative intentions used in social interaction:

  • addressing people;

  • greetings and saying goodbye;

  • introducing self and others;

  • enquiry about how others are, and responses to similar enquiries;

  • asking for and receiving permission;

  • expressing thanks and responding to expression of thanks;

  • apologising and responding to apologies;

  • congratulations, greetings and responding to congratulations and greetings;

  • forms of address and ending informal letters.


Expressing emotions:

  • regret;

  • joy;

  • satisfaction, discontent;

  • surprise;

  • hope,

  • sorrow

  • anger.


Expressing personal attitude and opinion:

  • expressing and asking opinions and responding to that;

  • admitting or not admitting that somebody is right;

  • agreeing, disagreeing,

  • approval and disapproval;

  • will, desire, ability, obligation, necessity and possibility;

  • promise;

  • intention, plan;

  • praise and criticism.


Communicative intentions related to the exchange of information:

  • naming and describing objects and persons;

  • describing events;

  • asking and giving information;

  • affirmative and negative answers;

  • knowledge and ignorance;

  • certainty, uncertainty;


Influencing partner's actions:

  • request;

  • prohibition, call;

  • suggestion and responding to suggestions;

  • invitation and accepting/declining invitations;

  • offering and responding to offers.


Typical communicative intentions in interaction:

  • checking understanding, asking for repetition;

  • expressing lack of understanding;

  • request for spelling, spelling;

  • request for slower or louder speech.



Concepts:

  • Expressing actions, events or existence.

  • Expressing possession;

  • Spatial relations;

  • Chronological relations;

  • Reported speech;

  • Quantitative relations;

  • Qualitative relations;

  • Modality;

  • Case structure;

  • Logical relations;

  • Cohesive devices.



Prerequisites of moving ahead
Listening skills

Pupils can



  • Understand instructions and respond in actions;

  • Understand requests, questions, statements and accounts of events;

  • Derive important information from a text with approx. 100 words largely containing known linguistic devices;

  • Understand the main points of an approx. 100 word text in standard language;

  • Extrapolate the meaning of an unknown language component from a n approx. 100 word text largely containing known linguistic devices;

  • Distinguish relevant and non-relevant information in an approx. 100 word text largely containing known linguistic devices.


Speaking skills

Pupils can



  • Give simple, structured answers to questions largely containing known linguistic devices;

  • Make statements in simple sentences;

  • Ask questions;

  • Relate events;

  • Ask for help in case of problems with understanding;

  • Participate in a simple conversation;

  • Keep a conversation going e.g. by initiating a new topic.


Reading skills: understanding texts

Pupils can



  • Understand the main points of a text containing familiar linguistic devices;

  • Extrapolate the meaning of unknown language components in a text largely containing known linguistic devices;

  • Read an approx. 100 word text containing familiar linguistic devices;

  • Scan approx. 100 word text containing familiar linguistic devices for important information.

  • Understand the main points of an approx. 100 word text containing familiar linguistic devices;

  • Understand a simple story; extrapolate the meaning of unknown language components in a n approx. 100 word text largely containing known linguistic devices;

  • Distinguish between important and unimportant information in an approx. 100 word text written in standard language;


Writing skills

Pupils can



  • Write down a text containing known linguistic devices correctly;

  • Formulate simple written statements and questions;

  • Write a simple structured text (message, greeting, informal letter);

  • Write a short text (approx. 50 words) to communicate facts, using known structures;

  • Write a short description or report (50 to 70 words).

For further reference, below is a list of proficiency levels as defined by the Council of Europe:
The definition of proficiency levels on the basis of the recommendations of the Council of Europe regarding foreign language teaching*
C2 The language learner can easily understand every written or heard text; can summarise information from different spoken or written sources and give a comprehensive account of arguments and reports; capable of spontaneous expression in a fully coherent and precise style; can convey finer shades of meaning even in rather complex situations.
C1 The language learner can understand extended and sophisticated texts sensing hidden meaning; capable of fluent and spontaneous expression without much obvious searching for expressions; can use the language flexibly and effectively for social and professional purposes, such as learning and work; can construct clear, well-structured, detailed text of fairly complex subjects with an assured use of templates and connective devices.
B2 The language learner can follow texts of complex concrete or abstract subjects, including conversations in his/her field of occupation; can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes interaction with native speakers quite effortless for both parties; can present clear, detailed descriptions on a wide range of subjects and is capable of expressing personal views on an issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options.
B1 The language learner can understand the main points of clear standard texts on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc.; can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in areas where the language is spoken; can create simple, can create simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest; can describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes and ambitions and can briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.
A2 The language learner can understand phrases and the highest frequency vocabulary related to areas of most immediate personal relevance (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment); can communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on family matters or everyday life; can describe in simple terms personal attitude to something in the immediate environments or in areas related to the most basic needs.
A1 The language learner can understand and use the most frequent expressions and very basic phrases used in everyday communication with the purpose of satisfying concrete immediate needs; can introduce self and other people and can answer questions concerning personal issues (e.g. place of living), people known or things possessed; can interact in a simple way provided the other person speaks slowly and clearly and prepared to help.


Download 2 Mb.

Share with your friends:
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   31




The database is protected by copyright ©ininet.org 2020
send message

    Main page