Navy sbir fy10. 1 Proposal submission instructions



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PHASE I: Conduct research to develop a novel approach to detect potential failures, particularly kinks, fractures, and breaks as well as predict life expectancy in outboard multi-conductor cables. Results from Phase I should include initial design schematics, preliminary control software and prediction algorithms, and anything else that would indicate the production of a prototype detection and prediction device during Phase II is feasible.
PHASE II: Based on the outcome of the Phase I effort, develop a scaled prototype to be evaluated within a controlled environment to detect and predict outboard cable failures. The prototype should be able to evaluate new multi-conductor cables for quality control as well as inspect existing cables for fatigue from use. The prototype should also be able to demonstrate its predictive algorithms used for service life estimates.
PHASE III: Upon successful completion of the Phase II effort the program office anticipates working with the firm and its manufacturers in order to procure a full scale prototype for real world testing within a shipyard environment. Once the R&D efforts have been completed the program office anticipates purchasing units for use within the Navy.
PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Other potential applications include other branches of DOD with in service multi-conductor cables, commercial industries such as telecom, and automated systems using multi-conductor cables.
REFERENCES:

1. Sub-cycle detection of incipient cable splice faults to prevent cable damage; Kojovic, L.A.; Williams, C.W., Jr.; Power Engineering Society Summer Meeting, 2000. IEEE Volume 2, 16-20 July 2000


2. Application of thermoelectric aging models to polymeric insulation in cable geometry; Cooper, E.S.; Dissado, L.A.; Fothergill, J.C.; Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation, IEEE Transactions on [see also Electrical Insulation, IEEE Transactions on] Volume 12, Issue 1, Feb. 2005
KEYWORDS: SubHDR; Dip Loop; Cable; outboard; break; z-kink; multi-conductor

N101-058 TITLE: Application of Coatings for Complex Ship Structural Surfaces Using



Electrostatics
TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Materials/Processes
ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMS 500, DDG 1000 Program, ACAT 1
OBJECTIVE: Develop and demonstrate an approach and the associated technology(ies) usable with a range of surface coating systems that will allow for the application of a uniform coating thickness to complex surfaces using electrostatics.
DESCRIPTION: Coating failures tend to occur most rapidly in areas of geometrical irregularity on corners and edges. While the Navy has invested in edge retentive coating systems, application procedures still require the application of multiple coats (primer, stripe coat on edges and corners, and a topcoat) due to the challenges inherent in coating complex surfaces. The current naval practice requires the application of multiple coats (or in some cases a single thick coat) with extensive quality assurance checks and coating touchup in thin areas to ensure that there are no exposed areas that would be susceptible to corrosion. The need for multiple touchup applications to ensure adequate coverage directly translates to increased labor and materials costs. Many of the areas that need remedial coating application are in the areas of geometric irregularity.
This topic seeks the development of an approach to reliably deposit a uniform coating at a controlled thickness on complex surfaces using electrostatics. The reliable application of a uniform coating could eliminate the need for substantive additional applications of paint to the complex areas that are difficult to reach using conventional coating processes. This would directly translate to an appreciable saving in labor costs. Areas of particular challenge are in tanks and voids where stiffeners, piping, and supports create areas that are nearly inaccessible to conventional coating spray equipment. Electrostatics would take advantage of the steel substrate of the coating application to promote adherence to complex shapes and to areas that are out of the line of sight, such as behind I-beams. The specific electrostatic method chosen must be compatible with the existing range of surface coating systems. For the purposes of demonstrating concept feasibility, initial developmental emphasis should be upon coating systems (primarily epoxies) currently in use in the naval shipbuilding industry such as those qualified to MIL-PRF-23236. The proposed process must be operable in an industrial shipyard environment and must be portable to allow for operation in remote ship spaces by no more than two people.
PHASE I: Demonstrate the feasibility of the application of a uniform coating thickness to complex structures using electrostatics. Establish performance goals and metrics to analyze the feasibility of the proposed solution. Provide a Phase II development approach and schedule that contains discrete milestones for product/prototype development
PHASE II: Develop a prototype of the proposed Phase I concept(s). Using laboratory characterization experiments, validate the performance goals identified in Phase I. Provide manpower, cost-savings and performance metrics. Prepare an implementation and test plan that contains discrete milestones for product development for the purposes of obtaining necessary certifications for shipyard and/or manufacturing sector implementation.
PHASE III: Utilizing the concept(s) developed during Phase I and Phase II, work with Navy and industry to approve and certify the proposed concept for use in Navy applications and then transition this technology to existing and future surface combatant systems.
PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: This technology would have a broad range of applications in commercial industries such as manufacturing, automobile, construction (infrastructure applications, bridges, etc.) and commercial shipbuilding.
REFERENCES:

1. Kaznoff, A.I. and Brinkerhoff, B., “The Future of Marine Tank Coatings-A U.S. Navy Perspective”, Journal of Protective Coatings & Linings, Vol. 22, No. 2, Feb 2005, pg 40-44.


2. MIL-PRF-23236C, Performance Specification, Coating Systems For Ship Structures, Aug 2003. http://assist.daps.dla.mil/online/start/
KEYWORDS: coating; structures; application; automation; corrosion control

N101-059 TITLE: Ultra Wide Bandwidth High Dynamic Range Digital ISR Receivers for the



submarine force
TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Ground/Sea Vehicles, Sensors
ACQUISITION PROGRAM: AN/BLQ-10A(V) Submarine SIGINT Collection Suite -- ACAT III
RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports): This topic is "ITAR Restricted." The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data. Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.
OBJECTIVE: Develop an innovative Ultra-wideband (>20 GHz instantaneous processing Band Width (BW)) high dynamic range (>75 dBm) radar wideband subsystem that cannot easily be captured by Continuous Wave (CW) signals, dense environments or complex emissions.
DESCRIPTION: The current radar wideband subsystem of the AN/BLQ-10 A(V) SIGINT suite is based on Instantaneous Frequency Measurement (IFM) /Digital Frequency Discriminator (DFD) technology and is easily “captured” by CW, extremely high duty cycle signals or very dense environments. The ability of this system to perform against very complex emitters is degrading.
While bits and pieces of technology solutions exist in various stages of development, no total engineering solution exists. Consequently, an innovative, extremely wideband system must be developed to provide 100% Probability of Intercept (POI) in today’s dense and complex environment without providing ambiguous or erroneous reports. The total SBIR project will provide a solution that has improved the Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF) (> 500 hour improvement), reduced the total vertical footprint (< 12 U total), cut power and weight by over 1/3 the current subsystem, and, finally, reduce the recurring cost of the Radar Wide Band (RWB) subsystem by at least 20%.
The current signals that are problem sets are: extremely short and extremely long pulse width (PW) signals (PW’s less than 30 nanoseconds and greater than 512 microseconds wide); signals with Pulse Repetition Interval (PRI) agilities (staggers – greater than 64 positions, jitters – greater than 40%, discrete jitters – greater than 64 positions, micro-jitters, switch and dwells, and pulse code modulation); signals with Frequency agilities (intra-pulse Frequency Modulation (FM) (linear and non-linear FM, phase coding), and inter-pulse FM (jitters, multi-tone, pulse to pulse frequency shifts, switch and dwells, and phase code modulation); solid state transmitters, multi-beam signals, electronically scanned emissions, and emissions showing agility in multiple simultaneous dimensions.
Because of the environment the submarine operates in, extremely high dynamic range is crucial especially as systems operate over extremely large bandwidths. Maintaining sensitivity requirements in the presence of powerful emitters mandates dynamic ranges greater than 75 dB. When operating in the presence of strong signals the wideband detection systems must still detect the low power emissions.
PHASE I: Develop a conceptual design for a hardware and software approach for showing a 100% POI Design that has an instantaneous RF bandwidth of greater than 20 GHz with a multi-tone dynamic range of greater than 75 dB. This concept must operate in an environment that requires a pulse throughput of greater than 5 million pulses per second.
PHASE II: Design, Fabricate and test a lab demonstration of the hardware and software mechanism designed in Phase I. Testing must be performed under controlled real world conditions.
PHASE III: If successfully demonstrated in Phase II, develop and install the demonstration asset on a submarine for at sea testing and demonstrations. If successful and evaluated at a TRL of 7 or higher this capability will be transferred into the AN/BLQ-10 (V) as part of the Program of Record (POR).
PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL: Harbor surveillance for homeland security and law enforcement surveillance are possible commercial applications of such devices.
REFERENCES:

1. Fundamentals of Statistical Signal Processing, Vol. 1; Prentice-Hall, Steven M. Kay, 1993


2. HTTP://www.SharpEye.biz/sharp/index.php
3. The Beginnings of Solid State Radar, Hyltin, T.M.; IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems, Volume 36, Issue 3, Part 1, July 2000 Page(s):1016 - 1019
4. R. Wiley, The Analysis of Radar Signals, 2nd ed. London, U.K.: Artech House Press, 1993
KEYWORDS: electromagnetic propagation; radar narrow band; radar wideband; compressive receivers, delay lines

N101-060 TITLE: Advanced, Automated Sensing and “3-D” Control/Targeting System for Exterior



Shipboard Fires
TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Sensors
ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMS 500, DDG 1000 Program, ACAT 1
OBJECTIVE: Development of advanced automated sensing and control/targeting system, including fire initiation detection and “3-D” localization. This will enable the rapid detection and localization of exterior shipboard fires involving composite/ flammable materials located on a deckhouse to support an automated firefighting response.
DESCRIPTION: The threat of fire is increased in new ship designs because the superstructure is made of composites and coated with materials, which are also flammable, that help to reduce ship signatures. Suppressing exterior shipboard fires involving deckhouse materials that can rapidly burn requires an automated sensing and targeting capability that does not rely upon an operator to assimilate data to determine where and when the fire started. The current state-of-the-art in sensor technology does not support localization of a fire which, once determined, can then be used to automatically or autonomously target and aim a fire fighting agent response. Currently available sensors will provide either early warning (e.g. smoke) or a total flooding response (e.g. optical flame detector or a heat detector in a magazine detects flame/heat), but the response is then a total flooding of the space.
External fire sensors are not currently used on naval ships and are a challenging problem for the following reasons:

(1) There are no topside passages outboard of the superstructure; therefore, there is no easy method of accessing the topside.

(2) The sensors must withstand environmental and weather factors. The current state-of-the-art sensors are not operable in this application.

(3) The area of coverage required is large, yet the requirement is to be able to precisely detect and localize a fire to enable an immediate and prompt casualty response.

(4) The sensors must address and not degrade the signature control issue.
This topic seeks innovations and alternative approaches to the development of advanced, automated sensing and control/targeting techniques, including fire initiation detection and “3-D” localization which will significantly reduce the risk of an out-of-control fire involving the deckhouse. The desire is to be able to provide a continuous, automated, exterior, fire detection capability as well as support the precise targeting or localization of the fire. It is envisioned that these sensors and associated algorithms would be included as part of the overall ship control system and would initiate an overall fire suppression system response. Proposed solutions will need to be able to detect fires up to several hundred feet depending on their installed location and will have to operate in an automated fashion and under environmental conditions that may impair visibility such as smoke, fog, salt spray, temperature range extremes or night-time operations. The proposed solution would also need to be able to maintain real-time feedback capability once the monitor stream is activated, be immune to false alarms under the above stated conditions, and be able to detect fires involving Class A or Class B materials. It is anticipated that for some sensor technologies the sensor may be affected by the fog stream itself.
PHASE I: Demonstrate the feasibility of an innovative approach to the development of a sensor system that supports automated fire detection and targeting for fires that can be initiated anywhere on a “typical” deckhouse structure. Develop an initial conceptual design and establish performance goals and metrics to analyze the feasibility of the proposed solution. Develop a test and evaluation plan that contains discrete milestones for product development for verifying performance and suitability.
PHASE II: Develop and demonstrate the prototype(s) as identified in Phase I. Through laboratory testing, demonstrate and validate the performance goals as established in Phase I. Refine and demonstrate the capabilities of the system. Simulated environmental conditions and fire/ firefighting effects should be included in the demonstrations. Conduct life cycle and environmental testing. Develop a cost benefit analysis and a Phase III testing, qualification and validation plan.
PHASE III: The small business will work with the Navy and commercial industry to commercialize the fire detection system with a design that meets the Military Specifications for shipboard use. Demonstrate the system in realistic, full-scale fire tests. The fire detection systems shall be UL listed and Mil Spec qualified.
PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: This concept could have application for the protection of minimally-manned shore-side facilities (e.g., electrical sub-stations) and monitoring secure areas.
REFERENCES:

1. Sorathia, U., Kiviat, B., and Lattimer, B., “Fire Safety Goals and Material Performance Criteria for Composites Considered in the Topside Applications on Surface Ships,” NSWCCD-64-TR-1999/01, November 1999.


2. White, D.A., Scheffey, J.L., Sincaglia, P.E., Farley, J.P., Williams, F.W., “Advanced Enclosed Mast/ Sensor System Fire Hazard Analysis,” NRL Ltr Rpt 6180/0316, 25 July 1996.
3. White, D.A., Scheffey, J.L., Farley, J.P., Williams, F.W., “LPD17 Amphibious Dock Ship: Fire Hazard Assessment of the Forward and Aft AEM/S System Masts,” NRL Memorandum Report 6180-00-8467, 26 June 2000.
4. Rollhauser, C.M., “Composite Fire Hazard Evaluation for the Integrated Technology Deckhouse,” DTRC/SME-89/03, David Taylor Research Center, Bethesda, MD, February 1989.
5. DDG-1000
KEYWORDS: Fire-fighting; damage control; sensors; control algorithms; automated; deckhouse

N101-061 TITLE: Multi-Algorithm Unique Emitter Identification


TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Ground/Sea Vehicles, Sensors, Battlespace
ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMS-435 Submarine Tactical EW System AN/BLQ-10(V) - ACAT III
RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports): This topic is "ITAR Restricted." The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data. Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.
OBJECTIVE: Develop innovative algorithms and multi-algorithm fusion techniques for submarine EW/ISR system to support unique emitter identification. The need is to develop this technology with operator workload reduction being paramount. Any automation techniques must ensure an extremely high degree of confidence in accuracy of reports.
DESCRIPTION: The recent emergence of diverse and complex non-magnetron based solid-state radars into the commercial maritime market presents a future challenge to submarine situational awareness. As manufacturing technology matures and costs decrease, technically advanced radars are expected to be utilized more and more in shipborne maritime navigation systems as well as in land based coastal surveillance applications. Timely and accurate situational awareness of surface activity is crucial to ensuring safe passage, maintaining tactical superiority and asserting control in underwater operations. Passive techniques that detect and uniquely identify technologically advanced radars based solely on the analysis of their emissions are sought. Open multi-algorithm solutions are anticipated based on the expectation that no single technique will perform uniformly best against all present and/or future radar systems. Specific identification algorithms shall be developed as well as methodologies to fuse multiple algorithms for the purposes of enhanced identification performance. The need to reduce the operator workload is paramount, so the need for automation with an extremely high confidence level for correct identification is critical.
PHASE I: Develop identification algorithms for specific identified target emitters and develop an overall open architecture/methodology to fuse the results of multiple algorithms. Provide proof-of-concept via simulation demonstrating that multiple algorithms provide an overall identification performance benefit while guaranteeing an extremely high confidence of accurate reports.
PHASE II: Choose three or more algorithms and a computational architecture for their implementation to yield a demonstration system that works with 1 GHz intermediate frequency signals. Develop interface control software that allows intuitive operation of the system. Develop Automation Techniques that minimize operator interaction while guaranteeing an extremely high confidence level of accurate reports.
PHASE III: If successfully demonstrated in Phase II, develop and install devices of this type on a submarine platform as part of a technology demonstration. If the demonstration is successful and TRL levels are assessed to be greater than 7 then the capability will be transitioned to the AN/BLQ-10 program of record.
PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Passive tracking of advanced RF devices has application in personnel tracking, cell phone monitoring and identification verification.
REFERENCES:

1. Fundamentals of Statistical Signal Processing, Vol. 1; Prentice-Hall, Steven M. Kay, 1993

2. HTTP://www.SharpEye.biz/sharp/index.php

3. The Beginnings of Solid State Radar, Hyltin, T.M.; IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems, Volume 36, Issue 3, Part 1, July 2000 Page(s):1016 - 1019

4. R. Wiley, The Analysis of Radar Signals, 2nd ed. London, U.K.: Artech House Press, 1993
KEYWORDS: Identification, Detection, Tracking, Algorithm Fusion

N101-062 TITLE: Improved Torpedo Defense


TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Sensors
ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMS-415: Anti-Torpedo Torpedo Defense System: ACAT II
RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports): This topic is "ITAR Restricted." The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data. Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.
OBJECTIVE: Develop innovative technology to resolve closely spaced approaching torpedo salvos near end-fire of towed sensors.
DESCRIPTION: A difficult technical challenge for surface ship torpedo defense is the spatial resolution of closely spaced multi-torpedo salvos. Passive detection and localization are typically done with towed line arrays, which have been shown to localize well and resolve multiple targets near broadside with state-of-the-art processing (see reference 1, chapter 9). Target resolution near end-fire is much more difficult because of the broader line array beamwidths, and the inability to use wavefront curvature or triangulation with hull-mounted sensors. Innovative approaches are solicited.
The objective of this topic is to perform R&D that will clearly establish the technical feasibility of end-fire salvo resolution. Torpedoes are typically loud passive acoustic emitters with significant broadband energy from 0- 30 kHz. (Reference 3 describes typical broadband signatures of ocean vehicles.) Satisfactory performance would provide resolution of targets separated by 50-100 yards at ranges of 1000-5000 yards.
Proposed techniques may include innovative passive signal processing techniques, model-based approaches, matched field processing (reference 2), exploitation of acoustic propagation effects, Doppler, etc. The Navy’s primary interest is in towed array solutions but multi-sensor (tow ship sonar and towed array) solutions are also of interest. Significant flexibility in proposed approaches will be accommodated.

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