Period 5 Unit Calendar 16-17



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Name__________________________________ Morelli|APWH Period___ Date_______
Period 5 Unit Calendar 16-17

February 2017

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

January 30

Period 8 and Period 9 Exams




January 31
Aim: What is the best way to attack the multiple choice on the AP World History Exam?


1
Aim: What’s the difference between “early modern” and modern”?
DUE: 5.1



2
Aim: How and why did the Enlightenment usher in global revolutions in the Atlantic World?
DUE: 5.2


3
Aim: How do the North American Independence Movement and the French Revolution compare and contrast?


6
Aim: How do the Haitian Revolution and the Spanish American Revolutions compare and contrast?



7
Aim: How can Crane Brinton’s Anatomy of a Revolution be applied to the Atlantic Revolutions?

DUE: 5.3

8
Aim: How can Crane Brinton’s Anatomy of a Revolution be applied to the Atlantic Revolutions? (Part II)



9
Aim: How does the concept of “rights” emerge and change at the turn of the nineteenth century?
DUE: 5.4

10
Aim: To what extent can the West (specifically Britain) be considered the leader and originator of the IR?
DUE: 5.5

13
Aim: How did the concept of social class change as a result of the Industrial Revolution?
DUE: 5.6

14
Aim: What were the social responses to the Industrial Revolution?
DUE: 5.7

15
Aim: How did Western European industrialization affect other regions of the world?
DUE: 5.8

16
Aim: How did industrial economics drive European colonial development around the globe in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries?
DUE: 5.9


17
Aim: What were the economic consequences for those living under European imperial rule?
DUE: 5.10


20

No School – Presidents’ Day Weekend




21

No School – Presidents’ Day Weekend




22
Aim: How does indigenous identity shift with the influence of European colonial culture?
DUE: 5.11



23
Aim: Analyze African Responses to European Imperialism to practice POV/CAP.


24
Aim: In-class timed DBQ (prepare to go into lunch!)
DUE: 5.12


March 2016

February 27
Aim: Compare and contrast Chinese and Japanese responses to European imperialism
DUE: 5.13


February 28
Aim: How does the case study of tea highlight key themes of industrialism and imperialism?
DUE: 5.14

1
Aim: How does National Identity evolve because of imperialism, as seen through George Orwell’s essay “Shooting an Elephant”?
DUE: 5.15


2
Aim: How and why did the Ottoman Empire change from a Muslim threat to Europe to the Sick Man of Europe?
DUE: 5.16

3
Aim: Review the rubric for the LEQ and review for the Period 5 test


6
LEQ – Period 5



7
Period 5 Test

8
PERIOD 6!


9
LET’S GO!

10
HOME STRETCH!


5.1 Aim: What’s the difference between “early modern” and modern”?

  • Look at the maps on the following pages of Strayer: pp. 114-115; pp. 312-313; pp. 614-615; pp. 778-779. What evidence is there that Period 5 is the “European moment” in World History based on these maps? How would you characterize the other periods (as in, what might you dub Period 3), based on the maps and your knowledge of world history thus far?

  • Read the Stearns essay “Rethinking the Long 19th Century in World History: Assessments and Alternatives.” Stearns writes, “This article lays out the problems with the standard current frameworks, and then offers an alternative option that may better capture the key global emphases.” http://worldhistoryconnected.press.illinois.edu/9.3/forum_stearns.html

    • What problems does he discuss with this periodization?

    • What is his alternative?

    • What is your opinion, based on having read the Strayer pages and the Stearns pieces and having learned about the Long 19th Century earlier in high school (whether it was called that or not)?

  • In addition to completing the reading, please complete the Socratic Seminar Planning and Reflection Sheet


5.2: How and why did the Enlightenment usher in global revolutions in the Atlantic World?

Reading:

  • Review Strayer, pp. 756, Condorcet, “Sketch of the Progress of the Human Mind”

  • Hume, “On Miracles,” Reilly VII pp. 754-755 (stop at Thirdly on 755)

  • Strayer, pp. 961 “Editorial on China’s Examination System”

  • Rousseau, “The Social Contract,” pp. 757-8 (stop after 4. Slavery)

Discussion Questions

  • What is Hume’s POV? In what ways are the understandings of education and the construction of knowledge in Europe changing during the Enlightenment?

  • How does the Hume compare with traditional Chinese education and construction of knowledge? (NB: The China documents are from 1898 in response to increasing economic and cultural influence of the West, but still shed light on conservative Chinese views on human capability and education).

  • How is Rousseau an outgrowth of Hume? Using your prior knowledge, how will writings such as The Social Contract lead to revolutions in the Atlantic World?

  • Based on what you know about Chinese philosophy, how are the Western and Chinese views of human potential fundamentally different? Strikingly similar?

  • To what extent is the Enlightenment a major change in global intellectual thought? A continuity?



5.3 Aim: How can Crane Brinton’s Anatomy of a Revolution be applied to the Atlantic Revolutions?

Read Strayer Chapter 16 and prepare for a reading quiz. Use the chart on 16-a (found after page 825; Step 2: Comparing Atlantic Revolutions) to take notes.


5.4 Aim: How does the concept of “rights” emerge and change at the turn of the nineteenth century?

  • Complete the Document Study at the end of Chapter 16 to prepare for a Socratic Seminar.

  • Essential Questions:

    • How does the concept of “rights” emerge and change at the turn of the nineteenth century?

    • In what different ways does the idea of “rights” find expression in these documents (and in the Portrait on page 808)?

    • Historians frequently debate the relative importance of ideas in sharing historical events. What impact do ideas of rights expressed in these documents had on the historical development of the Atlantic world and beyond?

    • **How might these four authors have responded to one another? On which points might they agree and disagree? (I am particularly interested in your work on this question)

  • In addition to completing the reading, please complete the Socratic Seminar Planning and Reflection Sheet


5.5 Aim: To what extent can the West (specifically Britain) be considered the leader and originator of the IR?

  • Read Marks, “The Industrial Revolution and Its Consequences” (online)

  • Essential Question:

    • Britain (and therefore, the West) is widely considered the leader and developer of industrial processes and economies. To what extent does Marks complicate this history of industrialization? Based on your past learning in this class and others, to what extent do you agree with his argument?


5.6 Aim: How did the concept of social class change as a result of the Industrial Revolution?


  • Read Strayer pp. 835-841 and complete Step 3 of Chapter Wrap Up (pp. 17-a and 17-b which come after p. 877).

  • Essential Question: How did the concept of social class change as a result of the Industrial Revolution?

  • In addition to completing the reading, please complete the Socratic Seminar Planning and Reflection Sheet



5.7 Aim: What were the social responses to the Industrial Revolution?

  • Read Strayer pp. 842-846, Sources 17.3 (Smiles) and 17.4 (Marx) + Luddite Primary Sources (see separate handout online)

  • Be prepared to engage in a Socratic Seminar style discussion in which you will speak from one of these three perspectives (assigned in class).

  • Essential Question: Why did different social groups respond as they did to economic and social changes of the IR?

  • In addition to completing the reading, please complete the Socratic Seminar Planning and Reflection Sheet


5.8 Aim: How did Western European industrialization affect other regions of the world?


5.9 Aim: How did industrial economics drive European colonial development around the globe in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and how did Europeans and Africans interpret the economic motivation for imperialism?

  • Read Strayer pp. 879-889

  • Analyze the visual sources on the Scramble for Africa at the end of Chapter 18. Use the questions below each source to guide your note-taking. We will use the final questions at the end of the visual sources to guide a Socratic Seminar

  • In addition to completing the reading, please complete the Socratic Seminar Planning and Reflection Sheet


5.10 Aim: What were the economic consequences for those living under European imperial rule?

  • Read Strayer pp. 889-902. Prepare for an SAQ.


5.11 Aim: How does indigenous identity shift with the influence of European colonial culture?

  • Read Strayer pp. 902-912 “Believing and Belonging: Identity and Cultural Change in the Colonial Era”

  • In-class: Practice multiple choice


5.12: Aim: Analyze African Responses to European Imperialism to practice POV/CAP.

  • Using the documents given in class, prepare for an in-class DBQ.


5.13: Aim: Compare and contrast Chinese and Japanese responses to European imperialism.

  • Read Strayer pp. 931-941 (China) and 947-955 (Japan).


5.14: Aim: How does the case study of tea highlight key themes of industrialism and imperialism?

  • Read pages 187-220 from Standage’s History of the World in 6 Glasses. As you read annotate and take notes to respond to the following Essential Questions in a Socratic Seminar:

  1. How does tea embody the eras of industrialization and imperialism? Provide specific evidence from the text to support your answer.

  2. What were the consequences of “Britain’s peculiar enthusiasm for tea”?

  3. How does this reading help explain the link between industrialization and imperialism beyond the idea of “looking for natural resources”?


5.15: Aim: How does National Identity evolve because of imperialism, as seen through George Orwell’s essay “Shooting an Elephant”?

  • Essential Question: How does National Identity evolve because of imperialism, for both the colonized and the colonizers, as seen through George Orwell’s essay “Shooting an Elephant”?

  • Read the short story “Shooting An Elephant” by George Orwell. Annotate for when you think narrator has the situation IN CONTROL (I), when the situation is OUT OF CONTROL of the narrator (O), and places where NATIONAL IDENTITY (N) is shaped (either for the narrator or the Burmese)

  • In addition to completing the reading, please complete the Socratic Seminar Planning and Reflection Sheet


5.16: Aim: How did the Ottoman Empire change from a Muslim threat to Europe to the Sick Man of Europe?

  • Read Strayer pp 941-947. Prepare for an SAQ or Multiple Choice Questions (surprise! )


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