Report and recommendations of the task force on global education 22 may 2013 table of contents introductory Observations pp. 3-5 Student Programs Abroad



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Taskforce on Global Education

Final Report





REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS
OF THE
TASK FORCE ON GLOBAL EDUCATION


22 MAY 2013


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introductory Observations pp. 3-5
Student Programs Abroad pp. 6-14
Global Academic Programs pp. 15-21
International Student and Scholar Services pp. 22-28
Administrative Structures pp. 29-32
Recommendations pp. 33-34
Appendices pp. 35-43
Figure 1: Center for International Education p. 35
Figure 2: Center for Global Engagement p. 36
Draft Job Description for Vice Provost for

Global Engagement pp. 37-38


Draft Job Description for Director for

Global Student Engagement p. 39


Draft Job Description for Director for

International Student and Scholar Services p. 40


U.S.-Sino Pathways Program (Kaplan) p. 41
IRT-CIE Study Abroad data 2012 p. 42
QEP examples p. 43
Bibliography and Resources p. 44

Introductory Observations
Baylor University has many points of touch with the world. There should be many objectives for a university and each member of the faculty and the student body should touch this world at some point.

-----A.J. Armstrong, “Baylor’s World Touch,” The Baylor Bulletin, August, 1937


Baylor University Mission:

The mission of Baylor University is to educate men and women for worldwide leadership and service by integrating academic excellence and Christian commitment within a caring community.


Pro Futuris:

Our University vision Pro Futuris, clearly articulates the centrality of global engagement to Baylor’s mission. Aspirational Statement One of Pro Futuris, Transformational Education, states that “Baylor will be a community recognized for Transformational Education… where academic excellence and life-changing experiences ignite leadership potential that increases our students’ desire for wisdom, understanding of calling, and preparation for service in a diverse and interconnected global society.” To this end we will “provide greater opportunities for students to learn from the rich cultural diversity of the student body and surrounding community” and “we will continue to graduate students who are prepared and committed to influence the world through intercultural understanding and ethical and compassionate service to others.” Therefore, we will “increase opportunities for students to develop cultural competency for worldwide leadership through foreign language acquisition, study abroad opportunities, and internationally focused research.” Likewise, we will “expand opportunities to engage with community, state, national, and international leaders.”

Aspirational Statement Two, Compelling Scholarship, calls upon Baylor faculty and students to provide “research discoveries [that will] illuminate solutions to significant challenges confronting our world” and to join “the national and international community of scholars and artists in exploring the manifold issues and creative possibilities at the forefront of human discovery.” With respect to this aspiration we will “participate in local, state, national, and international conversations regarding society’s greatest challenges, offering perspectives informed by our faith, scholarship, and call to Christian service.”

Aspirational Statement Three, Informed Engagement, notes that our Christian faith inspires us to address systemic problems facing both the local and global community. We have sponsored, and will continue to sponsor, “an increased number of mission trips, especially those that are discipline specific, allowing students to use their intellectual and spiritual gifts to serve others while at the same time broadening their understanding of the rich cultural diversity found throughout the world. To this end we will pursue academic partnerships with local, national, and global constituents that are focused on meeting human needs.”

Finally, Aspirational Statement Four, Committed Constituents, exhorts us to “broaden Baylor’s constituency base by engaging the global Christian community in the activities and programs of the university.”

Given all this, the Taskforce on Global Education strongly recommends that all Baylor students should develop a “global competency,” that is, a global cultural awareness. Upon graduation Baylor students should demonstrate:

(1) An ability to interact effectively and respectfully with peoples of other cultures and diverse groups, both domestic and international.

(2) Broad knowledge of world history, global current events, and frameworks for practice. Not only is this global competency desirable for academic and humanitarian reasons, it will also provide our students with practical and applicable skills in their lives beyond Baylor.

(3) An ability to apply discipline-specific approaches to global issues.
Student placement rates and success in the job market have recently been a topic of much debate and discussion in higher education. A recent survey in The Economist found that the most highly sought skills in global managers were:
Cultural Sensitivity (73%)

Cross-Cultural Conflict Management (50%)

Understanding of Non-US Cultures (47%)

Understanding of Non-US Working Styles and Office Norms (42%)


Throughout this document, we will illustrate Baylor’s impressive strides in expanding global opportunities for our students, faculty, and staff; however, maintaining the status quo is not enough as we seek to position our graduates for leadership in a global society. The time has come for Baylor to become a truly global university.

* * * * *
In August 2012, Elizabeth Davis, Provost and Executive Vice President of Baylor University, created a Taskforce on Global Education to examine the various elements of international engagement currently being pursued at Baylor and to make recommendations to her based on our findings how we might best proceed to realize the aspirations articulated in Pro Futuris and help our students to attain the skills, competencies, outlook, and habits of mind to become global citizens in the 21st century. The members of the Taskforce represented a broad cross-section of the university:
Jeff Hamilton, Chair A&S, History

Michelle Berry Provost’s Office

Bradley Bolen Music

Heidi Bostic A&S, MFL

Jen Carron Enrollment Management

Jennifer Smyer Dickey Social Work

Eva Doyle Education, HHPR

Steve Gardner Business, Economics

Holly Joyner Global Living and Learning Community

Naymond Keathley Center for International Education

Ben Kelley Engineering/Computer Science

Becky Kennedy Student Life, Global Missions

Lai Ling Ngan Truett Seminary

Mark Long Honors College, Baylor Interdisciplinary Core

Mike Morrison Law School

Liz Palacios Student Life

Laine Scales Graduate School

Lori Spies Louise Harrison School of Nursing, Faculty Senate


The Taskforce was divided into four subcommittees to examine various aspects of international education at Baylor, and their findings are described below.

* * * Student Programs Abroad * * *
A Brief History of Baylor Student Programs Abroad

Baylor University has a long and proud history of global engagement. In its earliest years, much of this contact was initiated by Baptist missionaries. In his 1937 essay on “Baylor’s World Touch,” Professor A.J. Armstrong noted that he had been hosted by alumni missionaries in Japan, China, India, and many other countries, and “It has been a matter of pride for a long time that Baylor University has furnished more missionaries in the foreign field than any other institution in America.” Even today, many of our study abroad and exchange programs are conducted at institutions that were established long ago with the assistance of Baptist missionaries – the University of Shanghai for Science and Technology (initially established in 1907 as Shanghai Baptist College), Seinan Gakuin in Fukuoka, Japan (founded in 1916), and Hong Kong Baptist University (1956).

Professor Armstrong also played an important role in the creation of academic study-abroad programs at Baylor. During the 1920s and 1930s, he annually took groups of Baylor students and their parents on grand tours of Europe.

Another milestone was passed in the summer of 1982 when the Baylor in the British Isles program was held for the first time. Now known as Baylor in Great Britain, the program has operated every year since that time, and, with an annual enrollment at times surpassing 100 students, it has been Baylor’s largest study-abroad program. The Maastricht, Netherlands, program was launched in Spring 1995, and for many years was our only faculty-led semester-long study-abroad program.


Current Participation Levels

With these and other pieces in place, Baylor’s overall study-abroad participation rate (including undergraduate and graduate students) grew rapidly from about 14% in 1996-1997 to nearly 33% in 2000-2001, but then was interrupted by the events of September 11th. In the aftermath of that tragedy, air travel was disrupted and new security measures and insurance requirements were introduced by Baylor and other universities. On the other hand, in 2003, Baylor also introduced its Glennis McCrary Goodrich Scholarship Program for International Study. Since that time, the Baylor study-abroad participation rate has grown slowly to about 25% in 2010-2011. The charts that follow illustrate rates of growth for the university, as well as offering a comparison to peer institutions.




Year Rate Studied Abroad Graduates

1996/97 13.9 400 2881

1997/98 16.9 497 2933

1998/99 16.5 470 2841

1999/00 18.6 566 3047

2000/01 32.6 996 3051

2001/02 20.7 689 3325

2002/03 26.2 895 3415

2003/04 20.0 698 3498

2004/05 22.8 773 3387

2005/06 23.3 784 3371

2006/07 23.7 756 3190

2007/08 21.4 714 3339

2008/09 23.4 823 3516



2009/10 22.5 907 3589

Undergraduate Study-Abroad Participation Rates, 2010-2011

University

Studied Abroad in 2010-2011

Degrees Conferred 2010-2011

Study-Abroad Participation Rate

Freshmen With Pell Grants (%)

U. of San Diego

1,031

1,188

87

18

Pepperdine U.

612

806

76

20

Wake Forest U.

737

1,019

72

13

U. of Notre Dame

1,241

2,078

60

13

Duke University

798

1,493

53

14

Boston College

1,112

2,397

46

15

Vanderbilt U.

734

1,735

42

15

Southern Meth. U.

611

1,625

38

17

Emory U.

706

2,018

35

22

Wash. U. St. Louis

499

1,543

32

7

Texas Christian U.

506

1,705

30

17

Brigham Young U.

1,883

6,742

28

40

Baylor U

806

2,910

28

21

U. Texas Austin

2,350

8,838

27

29

Texas Tech U.

1,000

4,454

23

30

Texas A&M

1,856

8,451

22

20

Sources: Study-Abroad counts: Institute of International Education, Open Doors Data; Degrees Conferred: U.S. Department of Education, IPEDS Data Center; Pell Grant counts are based, in some cases, on U.S. News and World Report diversity rankings, supplemented with data from U.S. Department of Education.

At 28%, Baylor’s undergraduate study-abroad participation rate is marginally higher than the rates at major state universities in Texas, but it is much lower than the rates at many of the top-performing private universities. Our lagging performance seems to be explained, in part, by the fact that Baylor students are less wealthy, on average, than students at many of the top-performing private universities. As evidence of that fact, we find that the share of Baylor students who qualify for Pell grants (21%) is higher than the share at most of the other top-performing universities.


On the other hand, the economic fortunes of students at Pepperdine and Emory seem to be similar to those of Baylor students (judging by Pell eligibility), but their study-abroad participation rates are significantly higher than ours. With an improved set of programs, policies, and procedures, we should be able to significantly improve our participation rate. If we can also reduce the financial constraint through improved scholarship support, we should be able to move into the ranks of the top-performing programs.
We also are concerned by the fact that short-term programs account for a relatively large share of our study-abroad participation at Baylor, and semester or academic-year programs account for a relatively small share (see the following table). This is a matter of concern, because, for example, our IRT survey indicates that only 20% of students in short-term programs strongly agree that “my foreign language ability has improved as a result of this experience,” compared with 65% strong approval among students in our longer-term exchange and affiliate programs.






Baylor University

U.S. Universities




number

%

%

Summer Term

406

42.9

37.7

One Semester

241

25.5

34.5

8 Weeks or Less of Ac. Year

272

28.8

13.3

January Term

19

2.0

7.1

Academic Year

8

0.8

3.7

Other

0

0

3.7

Total

946

100.0

100.0

Institute of International Education. (2012). "Duration of U.S. Study Abroad, 2000/01-2010/11." Open Doors Report on Inter-national Educational Exchange. Retrieved from http://www.iie.org/opendoors; and Baylor CIE.

On a positive note, students in our study-abroad programs – long-term and short-term – express a high level of satisfaction in voluntary surveys. Regardless of the durations of their programs, large majorities of our students report that they have grown in personal confidence and they would recommend the programs to others.


Discipline-Specific Mission Programs

We already noted the historic role of Baylor students and alumni in the mission field. In that tradition, Baylor University received a grant from the Lilly Foundation in 2002 for the purpose of helping students explore vocation and calling. This funding launched the Department of Missions.



Since their inception, our discipline-specific mission programs have grown in the following areas.

  • Student participation – From 2006 to 2013, student participation has increased from 150 to 390 (a 260% increase).

  • Mission teams – From 2006 to 2013, the number of mission teams increased from 10 to 20.

  • Mission sites – From 2006 to 2013, the number of sites (and global ministry partners) has increased from 3 to 16.

  • Mission trips with academic credit – In 2009, the first trip to offer both academic credit and mission practice was Social Entrepreneurship in Africa. In 2011, seven trips offered academic credit. Teams begin course work in the spring, travel to the mission site for two weeks of intense work and conclude with reports (varies by course). After the 2011 trips, many of the faculty leading academic mission trips decided that until the university created a seamless process for this type of international trip they would no longer offer academic credit.



Discipline-Specific Mission Growth




Participants

Teams

Locations

2008

150

7

5

2009

163

11

6

2010

240

13

10

2011

321

20

17

2012

223

18

12

2013

390

22

17




  • 2013 Locations: El Salvador, France, Greece, Guatemala (3 sites), Haiti, Kenya, Louisiana, Mississippi, Panama, Peru, Texas, Uganda, Vietnam, Washington DC, Zambia

  • Academic Partners: Medical Humanities, HHPR, Family and Consumer Sciences, Engineering, School of Music, Accounting, Business, School of Social Work, & School of Nursing.

  • Global Missions present the potential for transformational impacts. To take one recent example, Sovannara Moch from Cambodia studied at Baylor University School of Social Work in the Global Mission Leadership initiative.  She received her MSW in May 2012 and returned to Cambodia to work directly with victims of human trafficking in Cambodia as well as to engage in shaping policy.  In two years, having developed an ongoing relationship with her through career services, she may be prepared to receive a discipline specific mission team from Baylor Global Missions. This team would be led by a faculty member currently doing research about best practices for human trafficking survivors.  The faculty member would bring a prepared team of students who are ready to engage their discipline (e.g., business, social work, health, journalism, political science) and Sovanarra, co-leading the team, would bring her cultural expertise and social work skills to the experience.  In five years of ongoing relationship, informed engagement, and research, we could see transformation with regard to the current issue of human trafficking as well as in each individual participant who is shaped by this experience. 


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