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New 2014-15 A.P. U. S. HISTORY I & II
INSTRUCTOR: William G. Keczkemethy Office hours and extra help: Mon. & Wed., 3:45 to 4:45

Required Resources:

1. Corse Text: Henretta, James, et.al, America’s History, (Bedford St. Martins, 2011).

2. In-class primary resources: Reading the American Past & For the Record: A Documentary History of Am. Hist.

3. Additional primary & secondary resources: Bedfordstmartins.com/henretta; hippocampus.com; apcentral.com

4. Any AP Workbook such as Peterson’s, Barron’s, Kaplan’s, etc,

5. Writing info: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/04/ & www.crockford.com/wrrrld/style.html


You are engaged in a university-level course. The combination of lecture, note-taking, reading, writing, review, discussion, and research make for a demanding course and require considerable preparation outside the class! Your reward for diligence and hard work shall not really be a grade, but new knowledge, understanding, and skills that will guaranty superior performance in college and business.
General Objectives:

History is not simply memorizing dates, names, deeds and places. It is the exploration of humanity’s struggle with nature, and human inter-relationships. We face much promise, and numerous problems. Your objective is to be better prepared to positively influence our world and perhaps help avoid crises. You will therefore need to gain:

1. significant knowledge and understanding of the people, ideas, movements, and institutions which shaped U.S. history.

2. a desire to ask further questions regarding humanity; the hows, whys, and what-ifs of our past. Prepare for leadership!

3. the ability to navigate and pass the College Board AP U.S. History Exam.
To these ends you shall study and create products that demonstrate your mastery of the following skills (S-1-11):


S-1. Historical argumentation

S-2. Appropriate use of relevant historical evidence

S-3. Historical causation

S-4. Patterns of continuity and change over time

S-5. Periodization

S-6. Comparison

S-7. Contextualization

S-8. Interpretation

S-9. Synthesis



. . . through the “Seven Themes” (T-1-7):

T-1. Work, Exchange, and Technology

T-2. Identity

T-3. Ideas, Beliefs, and Culture

T-4. America in the World

T-5. Environment and Geography

T-6. Politics and Power

T-7. Peopling (migrations & settlements)



Generally, students must understand and explain:

* how geography, demographics, character of leadership, & technology influenced the development of America.

* how change fuels the cycle of public satisfaction and dissatisfaction, and how dissatisfaction causes meandering

shifts in voting patterns and leadership.

* that change is constant and universal.

* that each generation writes its own incomplete and biased history.

* that those who do not learn from the past are condemned to repeat it.

* that our environment & times change, human nature does not!



And if this is not enough, student shall also be required to:

* read, digest, and interpret primary sources via books and the internet.

* examine historical events by today’s & by past standards, & consider rational alternatives & historical problems.

* write a U.S. History note book, including summarized listed vocab, thematic questions outlines, & ongoing timeline.

* take 2 practice AP Exams after school hours, and pass a national 3-hour AP Exam
The Nine Broad American Eras to be familiar with: By end of the year, students shall understand and be able to communicate the origin, facts, and impact of the following eras:

1. 1400-1608: Pre-Columbian World, & Early Discoverers (Chapters: 1, & 2)

2. 1609-1754: Formal Settlements, Early Colonial Sectionalism, & World Power Struggles (Chapters: 2 & 4)

3. 1754-1800: Colonial Maturation, War for Independence, & Establishment of the Republic (Chapters: 3, 4, 5, 6, & 7)

4. 1800-1848: Growth, Geo-Political Divisions, & Manifest Destiny (Chapters: 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, &12)

5. 1844-1877: Expansion of Slavery, North-South Sectionalism, Civil War, & Reconstruction (Chapters: 11, 13, 14, & 15)

6. 1865-1914: Taming The West, Unification, Industrialization, & Urbanization (Chapters: 16, 17, 18, & 19 )

7. 1890-1945: Imperialism, The Progressive Era, WWI, The 20’s, The Great Depression, & WWII (Chapters: 21, 20, 22, 23, & 24)

8. 1945-1989: Cold War, Happy-Daze, & America’s Dark Age (Chapters: 25, 26, 27, 28, & 29 )

9. 1980-present: Reagan Revolution, Recovery, & Recent History (Chapters: 30, 31)



Students’ detailed knowledge, understanding, and synthesis of each unit shall be assessed via a brief version of AP Exam.


Student Success Through Educational Principles

Pressure to improve education has resulted in many new “educational philosophies”. Unfortunately, some philosophies refer to viewpoints or beliefs rather than facts, and are then tied together with an over-simplified philosophical mantra. While most of these philosophical mantras contain a portion of truth, their narrow focus can lead to misunderstandings and problems.

For example, the educational mantra that “We must separate student behavior from student learning.” suggests that poorly behaving and disruptive students can be successful in class if educators would only stop punishing them academically for their misbehavior. Initially, this sounds progressive. No educator should fail a passing student simply because the student may be a bit troublesome. Yet this mantra fails to communicate two time-tested principles of human behavior. First, public school “classes” are social organizations that cannot effectively operate without discipline, mutual respect, and cooperation; every student has the right to a good and decent learning environment. Therefore, a student’s grade should be based, at least to some degree, on their ability to cooperate. More importantly, because learning is a behavior, behavior and learning cannot be fully divorced. Cutting class, sleeping, texting, being tardy, unprepared, unruly, or refusing to start or complete assignments are all behaviors that cannot but damage a student’s academic grade. If a student wants success he or she must develop a significant degree self control and cooperation.

Another related mantra “Every student can learn!” is true, but omits an important facet. This incomplete mantra suggests that any student failure must be caused by someone other than the student. Students learn at different speeds, in different ways, to different degrees, and largely based on their own initiative. Yes, people generally strive to achieve what is expected of them. Yet the principles of human nature also stipulate that if given an excuse, individuals may gravitate toward doing what they want, often blaming others for any shortcomings. Yes, every student can learn, if he or she is willing to invest the time and effort necessary.

Another misleading mantra states: “Students don’t need to memorize information, they simply need to know how to find information and how to synthesize”. Certainly we want students to achieve higher-order thinking, and there is an infinite amount of information that students can learn after graduation. Nonetheless, two provisions must also be remembered. First, students cannot reach a level of higher-order thinking without the basic building blocks of factual knowledge. Secondly, there is minimum critical mass of information that a typical high school student should have committed to memory by graduation. What college or firm would accept graduates if during an interview the student demonstrated ignorance of basic scholastic knowledge and principles? Students cannot achieve academic or social success without some measure of memorization.

I would hope that all involved would want educational objectives, strategies, and tactics, based on

universal truths and principles rather than mere philosophical mantras. Therefore, here is how my courses

work. Every day, I give my students a superior education. In return, each student agrees:

_____ I shall attend every class by making medical and other “appointments” after 3:30 pm.

_____ I agree to not miss class for other school/club activities (except official athletic games).

_____ I agree to pay my share of the AP Exam, and exhibit high performance on all assessments.

Students who refused to perform these basic responsibilities are sure to earn poor-to-failing AP Exam grades.


Fair warning: While I shall do all in my power to help students in their quest for success, I shall not engage in grade-dealing or grade manipulation so as to “give” a failing student a passing grade, or others the grade they simply “want.” The grade YOU EARN is the grade of record. Students working for a “B” or “A” shall be responsible for achieving “B” and “A” results on their assignments and assessments.
The Buddy System

Classes are social organizations that require a great amount of attention by students. Absences, tardies, and mental lapses often lead to misunderstandings when it comes to objectives and assignments. Not being in-the-know can be costly. To help students, I have instituted a “buddy system”. Students are required to share contact information with a minimum or two other trustworthy students. If a student is ever absent or not sure of something, they are required to contact their buddies so as to avoid being unprepared. The Buddy System also offers the added benefit of fostering discussion between students regarding subject content.

“I didn’t know . . .” is an embarrassing and unnecessary excuse for being unprepared.

_____ I agree that I alone am responsible for contacting a class buddy to find out anything I missed.

Deadlines: Students are given “x” amount of time to demonstrate mastery in this course, so efficiency and deadlines are extremely important. History is particularly tied to sequence, cause and effect, and accumulative understanding. Deadlines foster systematic success: turning-in assignments after we have moved on to new material is inefficient and injurious to achievement. If students are to miss a due date because of a game or wedding, they must give their work to a course Buddy, or e-mail it to me when it is due.

Exceptions: Illness or death in the family allow a student to hand-in late assignments the following day without penalty -- beyond that, significant penalties begin. All other late work shall be penalized 10% per day.


MAKE-UPs: Absent day of Quiz/Test - must make-up test on 1st day of returning to class after school.

_____ I agree to complete all assignments by their due date, and since I agree to not miss any class time, I agree to take missed assessment immediately after school, the day I return, or accept a “0”.
Please initial the agreements for success found throughout this syllabus:

______ I shall use a daily planner to schedule out of class, reading, writing, and editing time.

______ I shall INVEST 4-5 HOURS OUTSIDE CLASS EACH WEEK FOR SUCCESS.

______ I shall Attend all classes, take plenty of clear concise notes (review each night), and complete all reading.

______ I shall start and finish assignments early; NO MARATHON SESIONS.

______ Unless accompanied by doctor’s note no late work is accepted without penalties.
CLASSROOM DECORUM: THE FOLLOWING CANNOT BE TOLERATED:

______ I shall not waste my opportunity and tax-payers’ money by: arriving late, sleeping, refusing to work

on and complete assignments, missing deadlines, or unauthorized use of computer, etc.



______ I shall not disturb class (arriving late, side-bar talking, unauthorized use of cell phone, etc.)

______ I shall not engage in cheating or plagiarism = automatic “0”, referral, and no-retest.



Grading: Formative and Summative Assessments

Formative assessments (@ 20% of final grade) demonstrate a student’s progress in mastering subject content during the course of instruction, including homework, general class-work, and participation.

Summative assessments (@ 80% of final grade) demonstrate the student’s knowledge of a subject after instruction. These include major projects, important assessments, tests, and exams.

To help students be prepared, most assessments shall be scheduled. Unfortunately, weather, student releases, and fluctuations in progress do not allow perfect scheduling. Also, to keep sharp, students shall face some pop assessments. “You did not tell us about this assessment!” shall not be a legitimate complaint.


Scoring and Grading

Scoring can be done by the instructor or students. It is the process of assigning value to an anonymous assignment/assessment via a clearly understood answer key or scoring guide. Students shall have the opportunity to bring any miscalculations or debatable results to the instructor for full redress.

Grading is carried out by the instructor. It is the process of assigning value to student coursework and participation, but most importantly assigning a value to student overall achievement such as semester and final grades. Grades are not based on a student’s past performance. Students have GPAs, but there are no true “F” or “A” Students”. Each student is afforded the opportunity to be graded on his/her actual course performance.

This course is not math-based, nor is there an exact number of assignments. The number of assignments may vary based on the progress of the class and snow days. Grades are based on a student’s collective average. Some bright and savvy students like to “crunch numbers” so they can minimize effort yet maximize their grades. In this system, however, the best way to maximize one’s grade is to do one’s best as often as is possible. The course is Lecture/Text/Research/Writing based, so one must attend class and take notes, consistently read the text, and perform much research and writing to be successful.


Below are the approximate relative values/weights of assignments and assessments:

(Changes in values may occur based on time restraints and assignment/assessment frequency)




Semester I: AP U.S. History I.

Assignment Approx. value/weight



Participation ……….……….…...... 5%

Gen. Assignments ….……….......… 15%

Essays ………..……..………........... 25%

Research Paper ………………........ 10%

Five AP Style Unit Tests ………….. 25%

2 Comp Exams ………....…………. 20%

100%

Semester II: AP U.S. History II.

Assignment Approx. value/weight



Participation …….…………………. 5%

Gen. Assignments ….…..………….. 15%

Essays…………..…….….……......... 25%

Research Presentations……………..10%

Four AP Style Unit Tests………...... 20%

2 Comp. Exams ..…...….................... 25%

100%


AP U.S. History Exam: Be sure to familiar yourself with the New Exam format.
Writing:

The development of superior writing skills is a requirement. Therefore, much writing is necessary.

1. To prepare for AP Exam, all short essays must be hand written. Plagiarism = automatic 0 and referral.

2. The required 4-5 page research paper must be typed, double-spaced, with one-inch margins on all sides, and include: Introduction with stage-set, intro of topic, and thesis statement or question; Body of supporting information, facts, & analysis; MLA Citations; Conclusion with analysis; Works Cited page.

3. All assignments must be handed-in, in person, at the beginning of class on the assigned date. Except in cases of documented illness/emergency, late A.P. Essays shall be penalized 10% per day.
Participation:

As mentioned earlier, a class is a social organization in which all members have a part in educational progress. Therefore, students can boost, or harm, their grade by 5% based on their participation. Participation value is based on a scale of 0-10 depending on student attendance, cooperation, general input, frequency of answering questions, and ability to generate and sustain general intellectual discussions.


Retesting:

The ability to avoid timely study and review by taking tests at a later date defeats some portion of the purpose for testing, and is detrimental to effective learning. Last year, numerous AP students relied on test make-ups and retesting. While this helped their class grade, this false sense of security led to failing AP Exam grades. Therefore, “retesting” this year shall severely limited.

*There shall be no retesting if a student was involved in cheating

*There shall be no retesting of end-of semester final exams

*There shall be a limit of one formative quiz retest and one general/unit test, per semester.

Furthermore, a student may only re-take a quiz or test if:

1. The student has demonstrated effort and put-in extra study time and:

2. The retest is completed before the end of a quarter.


STUDENTS ALONE ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR MISSED NOTES, ASSIGNMENTS, TESTS, ETC.

` USE BUDDY SYSTEM to get missed assignments, etc.!

DO YOURSELF A GREAT FAVOR, START ASSIGNMENTS EARLY, WORK ON THEM FREQUENTLY, AND COMPLETE THEM AHEAD OF SCHEDULE; REMEMBER MURPHY’S LAW!


AP Exam Fees: Students planning to take an AP exam will pay $50 for each AP exam they wish to take. Students must pay by the exam-order date (Jan.) for their test to be ordered.  Students who qualify for fee assistance through AP Central may meet with the principal for consultation and a reduced fee. If, for any reason, a student fails to attend the AP testing session and take the exam after a test has been ordered for them, the student will be assessed the remainder of the AP testing fee.

Signed ____________________________________________ (parent/guardian)


Signed ____________________________________________ (student)

A.P. U.S. Semester I History Calendar: Units, Periods, & Assignments



1st Quarter: Introduction to Text, Lecture, & Writing
Unit I: 1200-1754

Due Date Text Chapters OBJECTIVES:

9/5/14 1-30 Generally understand the 9 major eras in U.S. History. S-4,5

Assignments:

1. Create a “Big-Picture” Vertical Time-Line, include all 9 Eras & 7 Themes 2. Quiz


9/8 /14 1-1,3,4, 2-1 Explain the roots, facts, impact of Euro. Exploration & settlement, 1450-1610. S-2

Assignments:

1. Explain roots via a Mind-Map; Facts via your timeline; & Impact via a thesis outline, include T-1,7

2. Regarding the lives of native-blood peoples today, did Euro settlement eventually ruin or improve their lives? T-1,2

3. Quiz

*Choose Topic for 5-page Semester Research Paper.


9/15/14 2-2,3,4, 4-2 1. Compare/Contrast Jamestown & Plymouth Colonies. S-6,7

2. Understand the relationship between Am. colonies’ geog., society, & economy. S-6,8

Assignments:

1. Compare/Contrast J-town & Plymouth via a thesis essay, include T-2,3,5,6

2. Demonstrate the relationship between the colonies’ Geo./Soc./Econ. via a Map, T-1-7



Unit 1. AP. Assessment
9/22/14 3-1,3, 4-1,3,4 1. Explain the British-American Econ.

2. Describe Colonial Changes 1700-50. S-2,3,4

Assignments:

1. Explain the Brit.-Am. Economy, via a Map & Thesis Outline, including T-1-6

2. Describe Am. Colonial changes 1700-1750 via a cause & effect flow chart, & A.P. Mult. Choice Test T-1,3


Unit II: 1750-1820

9/29/14 5 Evaluate the degree American’s were justified in warring for independence. S-1,2,3,8

Assignments:

1. Thesis Essay including T-2,3,5,6 & Debate 2. Quiz



*Outline & minimum of 10 data/quote/info cards due. (regarding your Semester Research Paper).
10/6/14 6-1,2,3 Assess the Prosecution of the War for Independence. S-3,7,8

Assignments:

Assess the prosecution of the War via a T-Chart including T-4,5,6
10/13/14 6-3,4 7-1 1. Describe the political creation of the United States. S-7,8

2. Evaluate Federalist Leadership T-3,6

Assignments:

1. Use Dec. of Indep., Artiles of Confed., and Constitution to summarize the above. Include T-2,3&6

2. Evaluate Federalist leadership via thesis outline, include 3 bits of hist. data & 3 hist. commentaries T-3,6



Unit 2. AP Assessment
10/16/14 7-2,3 Explain the Republic’s Growth. S-2,3,9

Assignments:

1. Explain Am. growth via a thesis essay. Discuss population geographic, & economic factors & T-1,4,5,7
10/17/14 1. IDs & Timeline due 2. Unit 3. Assessment; 3. Midterm AP Test
10/20/14 *Improved outline & minimum of 20 data/quote/info cards due. (Regarding your Semester Research Paper).
10/23/14 8 Evaluate “Republican Society”. S-2,4,7

Assignment:

1. Use 4 various primary resources, & 2 secondary, in an essay to evaluate Republican Soc., 1800-20 include T-1,2,3

2. Quiz


2nd Quarter: Introduction to AP Objectives, Research, & Self-Actualization
Unit III

Period 4: 1800-1848 [CR2]

CR1b-The course includes diverse primary sources consisting of written documents, maps, images, quantitative data (charts, graphs, tables), and works of art.

CR2-Each of the course historical periods receives explicit attention.

CR1c-The course includes secondary sources written by historians or scholars interpreting the past.

CR8-The course provides opportunities for students to examine relationships between causes and consequences of events or processes. – Historical causation

CR13a-The course provides opportunities for students to combine disparate, sometimes contradictory evidence from primary sources and secondary works in order to create a persuasive understanding of the past.

CR1b-The course includes diverse primary sources consisting of written documents, maps, images, quantitative data (charts, graphs, tables), and works of art. CR2-
Text Readings: America’s History, Chapters 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13-1,2,

Audio Visuals: A Biography of America, Episodes 6, 7, 8, and 9: Westward Expansion, The Rise of Capitalism, The Reform Impulse, and Slavery. Historical Scholarship Analysis: Ira Berlin, "I Will Be Heard: William Lloyd Garrison and the Struggle Against Slavery" from Portrait of America. Students will analyze Berlin's argument and evaluate his thesis,

evidence, and reasoning. Students will then write a FRQ with a thesis responding to

Berlin's analysis of the abolitionist movement focusing on the article and the student

responses. [CRS] John F. Marszalek, "Andrew Jackson: Flamboyant Hero of the Common Man" from Portrait

of America. Students will analyze Marzalek's argument, evaluate his thesis, evidence,

and reasoning, and respond to these in an essay. Students will participate in a seminar

focusing on the article and the student responses. [CR1c]


Due Dates - Student Activities/Products:

10/28/14 • Examine the presidency and shifting ideology of Thomas Jefferson by completing a President Profile Chart. Also examine the goals and accomplishments of Alexander Hamilton by completing an Impact of the Individual Chart. (ID-1)(WXT-2)(WXT- 6)(POL-2)(POL-5)(CUL-4)

10/29/14 • Outline how different groups were affected by the Louisiana Purchase by 1820. Include North-East, Slave South, and Old North-West, as well as race and class. (PE0-3)(WOR-5)(ENV-3)(ENV-4) [CR4] [CR8]

10/30/14 • Complete 2005 AP U.S. Hist DBQ on Republican Motherhood & the Cult of Domesticity. (CUL-2) [CR13a]

10/31/14 • Complete the “AP 1830’s Map” & include 2 contemporary illustrations from each section. T-1,2,3,5,6,7

11/3/14 • Interpret primary resources by Adams, Webster, Clay, Jackson, & Calhoun and outline their general positions.

11/10/14 • *Final outline & minimum of 25 data/quote/info for Research Paper

11/11/14 • Interpret the evolving historiography of the Trail of Tears presented in History in the Making, by Kyle Ward. (PE04) (PE0-5) (CU L-5) [CR4]

11/12/14 • Analyze the goals and accomplishments of President Andrew Jackson by completing an Impact of the Individual Chart. (POL-3)(CU L-5)

11/15/14• Divide into groups and prepare presentations on Temperance, Abolition, Women's Suffrage, and Workers' Rights. Each presentation will include a poster created in the style of the era and an analysis of primary sources related to the topic. (PO L-3) (CU L-5)

11/16/14• Research and write an epitaph for Theodore and Angelina Weld.

11/17/14• T-Chart the ideals and goals of the Seneca Falls Convention and arguments against these ideals.

11/18/14• Research and Analyze the following quantitative charts:

Graph: American Export Trade:1790-1815

Graph: Distribution of Slave Labor (1850)

Table: Wealth in Boston 1687-1848 [CR1b]

11/19/14 • Using SOAPSTone, analyze the following primary sources:

Document: Memoirs of a Monticello Slave (1847)

Document: The Harbinger: The Female Workers of Lowell (WXT-5)
11/24/14 • *Complete Semester Research Paper Due. (No late papers accepted without major penalty)


Unit V

Period 5:1844-1877 [CR2]

CR2-Each of the course historical periods receives explicit attention.

CR3-The course provides opportunities for students to apply detailed and specific knowledge (such as names, chronology, facts, and events) to broader Period 3:1754-1800 [CR2]

CR4-The course provides students with opportunities for instruction in the learning objectives in each of the seven themes throughout the course, as described in the AP U.S. History curriculum framework.

CR5-The course provides opportunities for students to develop coherent written arguments that have a thesis supported by relevant historical evidence. - Historical argumentation

CR10-The course provides opportunities for students to investigate and construct different models of historical periodization.- Periodization
Text Readings: America’s History, Chapters 13-3,4, 14, 15

Audio Visuals: A Biography of America, Episodes 10, 11, and 12: The Coming of the Civil War, The Civil War, and Reconstruction.


Due Dates - Student Activities/Products:

11/23/14• Interpret the changing historiography of the start of the Mexican War presented in History in the Making, by Kyle Ward and Chapter 8 of Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States, and research the effect of the war on the lives of Spanish Americans. (ID-6)(PE0-3)(PE0-5)(WOR-5)(WOR-6)(ENV-4) [CR4] [CR6]

11/25/14 • Using SOAPSTone, students will analyze the following documents and images:

Document: Across the Plains with Catherine Sager Pringle[CR1b]

Document: A White Southerner Speaks Out Against Slavery

Document: George Fitzhugh: The Blessings of Slavery

Document: Abraham Lincoln: A House Divided

Document: Mary Boykin Chesnut: A Confederate Lady's Diary

Image: A Poster advertising Uncle Tom's Cabin

Image: A handbill warning against slave catchers

• Analyze a map of the Election of 1860 and develop a thesis statement summarizing the significance of the election results. (ID-5 )(PE0-5) (POL-3)(POL-5)(POL-6) [CR1b]

12/1/14• Present & evaluate Southern arguments to justify secession. (ID-5)( PE0-5)( POL-3)( POL-5 )( POL-6)( ENV-3)

12/3/14 • Research and then evaluate this thesis: “The American Civil War was a total war impacting not only those on the battle field, but also those on the home front, and abroad.” Your essay must assess the impact of the war on all three areas by focusing on U.S. regional economies and U.S. and Confederate relations with Britain and France. [CR12]

12/4/14 • Analyze the presidency of Abraham Lincoln by completing a President Profile Chart.

12/5/14 To gain insight into the world history perspective on U.S. history, analyze accounts of Commodore Perry's Expedition to Japan from 2 AP World History textbooks & compare the account with that in America’s History. (WOR-3)

12/11/14• Evaluate the purpose and efficacy of Reconstruction. Use 2 “northern” and 2 :Southern” primary resources & contrary evaluations to create your thesis essay.

12/12/14 • Unit V. AP Assessment

Unit VI

Period 6a. :1865-1898 –Taming The West [CR2]

CR2-Each of the course historical periods receives explicit attention.

CR1b-The course includes diverse primary sources consisting of written documents, maps, images, quantitative data (charts, graphs, tables), and works of art.

CR4-The course provides students with opportunities for instruction in the learning objectives in each of the seven themes throughout the course, as described in the AP U.S. History curriculum framework.

CR13a-The course provides opportunities for students to combine disparate, sometimes contradictory evidence from primary sources and secondary works in order to create a persuasive understanding of the past.
Text Readings: America’s History, Chapters 16

Audio Visuals: A Biography of America, Episodes 16; Ken Buns, The West selected video.



Due Dates - Student Activities/Products:

12/13/14 • Read Document: Horace Greeley: An Overland Journey (1860). Identify his thesis, then outline.

12/14/14 • Read Robert Utley, "Sitting Bull and the Sioux Resistance" from Portrait of America. Respond in an essay, analyzing Utley's thesis, evidence, and reasoning.

12/15/14• Analyze maps of major Indian battles and Indian reservations (1860-1900), and read document: Tragedy at Wounded Knee (1890) then compose a thesis paragraph explaining the effects of westward expansion on Native American peoples. (ID-6)

12/17/14• Write a thesis essay to answer: Who Tamed the Wild West, and How? Evaluate the various groups and entities involved, and explain how the top four “groups/entities” and their technology helped tame the West. [CR3, CR5]
12/17/14 * Fully Corrected Research Paper Due (No late papers accepted without major penalty)
12/19/14 The First Semester Exam

Working in groups of three, students will review for the first semester exam by analyzing and evaluating models of periodization of U.S. history by comparing the model of periodization in the AP U.S. History curriculum framework with the periodization in the class textbook, America’s History, and Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States. They will construct their own periodization based on their evaluations. [CR10] The First Semester Exam is the DBQ from the 2005 AP U.S. History Exam, and multiple choice. Additional directions are provided. Students will be provided with some of the historical information given to the 2005 AP U.S. History Exam Readers.


2nd Semester, 3rd Quarter

Unit VII

Period 6-b. :1865-1898 Industrialization [CR2]

CR2-Each of the course historical periods receives explicit attention.

CR10-The course provides opportunities for students to investigate and construct different models of historical periodization.-Periodization

CR1b-The course includes diverse primary sources consisting of written documents, maps, images, quantitative data (charts, graphs, tables), and works of art.

CR12-The course provides opportunities for students to connect historical developments to specific circumstances of time and place, and to broader regional, national, or global processes. - Contextualization

CR4-The course provides students with opportunities for instruction in the learning objectives in each of the seven themes throughout the course, as described in the AP U.S. History curriculum framework.

CR13a-The course provides opportunities for students to combine disparate, sometimes contradictory evidence from primary sources and secondary works in order to create a persuasive understanding of the past.

CR13b-The course provides opportunities for students to apply insights about the past to other historical contexts or circumstances, including the present.

CR11-The course provides opportunities for students to compare historical developments across or within societies in various chronological and geographical contexts.- Comparison

CR1b-The course includes diverse primary sources
Text Readings: America’s History, Chapters 17, 18

Audio Visuals: A Biography of America, Episodes 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17: America at the

Centennial, Industrial Supremacy, The New City, The West, and Capital and Labor Historical Scholarship Analysis:

Students will then participate in a response seminar David Boroff, "A Little Milk, a Little Honey" from Portrait of America. Students will analyze Boroff's argument, evaluate his thesis, evidence, and reasoning, respond in an essay and participate in a seminar.


Student Activities/Products:

1/3/15 • Construct two flow charts explaining vertical and horizontal integration/consolidation.

1/4/15 • Compare & contrast the competing interests of labor and capital by completing a Competing Interests Chart. (WXT-5) (WXT-6) (WXT-7) [CR4]

1/5/14 • Evaluate the effectiveness of the Knights of Labor and the Grange in achieving their goals. (WXT-7)

1/6/14 • Using SOAPSTone, analyze the following primary sources:

Document: The Gilded Age (1880) (CUL-3)

Image: Puck Magazine: Cartoon of Standard Oil Monopoly

1/10/15 • Analyze the following quantitative visual: Table: Hand v. Machine Labor on the Farm (c.a. 1880)

1/12/15 • Describe/explain how 4 new technologies modernized American cities/city life.
Unit VIII

Period 7:1890-1945 [CR2]



CR4-The course provides students with opportunities for instruction in the learning objectives in each of the seven themes throughout the course, as described in the AP U.S. History curriculum framework.

CR2-Each ofthe course historical periods receives explicit attention.

CR9-The course provides opportunities for students to identify and analyze patterns of continuity and change over time and connect them to larger historical processes or themes. - Patterns of change and continuity over time
Text Readings: America’s History, Chapters 21-1,2, 19, 20, 21-3+, 22, 23, 24

Audio Visuals: A Biography of America, Episodes 18, 19, 20, 21, 22:T.R. and Wilson, A Vital

Progressivism, The Twenties, F.D.R. and the Depression, and World War II.
Student Activities/Products:

• Write an essay comparing and contrasting progressive era reform with the antebellum reform movements.

(WXT-7)(WXT-8)(PE0-6)(CUL-6) [CR9]

• Take notes on the Russian Revolution and its significance for the 1920s and 1930s U.S. domestic and foreign policies.

• Analyze Theodore Roosevelt by completing a presidential profile chart (Roosevelt's role in the Spanish American War and the development of National Parks will be emphasized). (PO L-6) ( ENV-5) [CR4]

• Students will analyze the role of Father Charles Coughlin in national politics by completing an Impact of the Individual Chart. (WXT-6, 7)(POL-4)(CUL-5)


Unit IX

Period 8:1900-1945 [CR2]

• Working in groups, will present the goals and accomplishments of New Deal programs. Students will interview two adults about the role of Social Security and FDIC then trace the history of these programs to the present and comment on how those programs reflect the nature of the U.S. semi-welfare state. (WXT-8) (CU L-6) [CR9]

• Working in groups, will make presentations on the impact of radio, motion pictures and automobiles, as well the increased availability of home appliances, on the changing role of women. (ID-7)(CUL-6)(CUL-7)

• Examine the American home front during World War II by analyzing "The War of Machines," a selection from David M. Kennedy's Freedom from Fear.

• Students will interpret the changing historiography of Japanese internment presented in History in the Making, by Kyle Ward. (POL-6)

• Using SOAPSTone, students will analyze the following primary sources:

Document: Lincoln Steffens: From "The Shame of the Cities" (1904)

Document: Newton B. Baker: The Treatment of German Americans

Document: Eugene Kennedy: A Doughboy Describes the Fighting Front

Document: Father Charles E. Coughlin:A Third Party (1936)

Document: Franklin D. Roosevelt:The Four Freedoms (1941)

• Students will analyze the following quantitative table:

The Great Migration: Black Population Growth in Selected North Cities (1910-20) (PE0-6)

• Using SOAPSTone, students shall analyze the following primary sources:

Image:1918 Liberty Loan poster: Halt the Hun

Image: Ford Automobile Advertisement

Image: Vacuum Cleaner Advertisement

Image: Recruiting Poster for the Civilian Conservation Corps

• Students will analyze the following map: Immigration to the United States 1901-20 (PE0-6)
Unit X

Period 8:1945-1980 [CR2]

Text Readings: America’s History, Chapters 25, 26, 27, 28, 29

Audio Visuals: A Biography of America, Episodes 23, and 24:The Fifties, and The Sixties.
Student Activities/Products:

• Examine John Lewis Gaddis' interpretation of the origins of the Cold War by reading "The Return of Fear" from The Cold War, A New History. Answer the question, "Did the Cold War begin after the Russian revolution or WWII?" Justify your answer. (POL-6)(WOR-7)(CUL-5) [CR10]

• Create a “Cold War Map” showing a divided Europe.

• Interpret the message and evaluate the effectiveness of Duck and Cover drills.

• Working in groups, do a presentation on one of the pioneers of 1950's Rock and Roll that will in elude two songs by the artist and historical analysis. (ID-7)(CUL-6)(CUL-7) [CR4]

• Compare and contrast the Korean and Vietnam Wars via a conflict comparison chart. (POL- 6)(WOR- 7)(CUL-6)

• Compare and contrast public criticism of the Vietnam War with criticism of the war efforts in World War I and World War II. Drawing on Young Americans for Freedom, SDS, folk music, and NY Times editorials, write an essay that argues which of the sources best represented U.S. values. (POL-6)

(WOR-l)(CUL-6) [CR13a] [CR13b]

• Research and debate the following: "There was a fundamental contradiction between Lyndon Johnson's efforts to stop Communism abroad and renew America through the Great Society." (POL-6)(WOR-7)

• Write an essay discussing the three phases of the Civil Rights movements (1950s, early 60s, and late 60s,) then compare this Civil Rights movements with the Progressive Era, focusing on the southern, northern, and western regions of the U.S. (ID-8) [CR11]

• Using SOAPSTone, analyze the following documents and images: The Truman Doctrine; John F. Kennedy's inaugural address (1961); Donald Wheeldin, "The Situation in Watts Today "(1967); Comic Book Cover: This is Tomorrow; Photograph of an Aerial View of 1950s Track Housing

• Analyze the Presidency of Richard Nixon by completing a President Profile Chart.

• Create a brief newscast describing the social, moral, economical, and international problems America faced by 1979. (ENV-5)

• Explain the Election of 1980, and its significance.

• Analyze the following graph: U.S. Military Forces in Vietnam and Casualties (1961-81)

• Students will write response papers to images of the paintings and prints made by Andy Warhol and Richard Diebenkorn and comment on how these works remain relevant to universal truths today-or not. [CR1b]

CR2-Each of the course historical periods receives explicit attention.

Unit XI

Period 9:1980-present [CR2]

Text Readings: America’s History Chapters 30, 31

Audio Visuals: A Biography of America, Episodes 25 and 26: Contemporary History, and The Redemptive Imagination.
Student Activities:

• Analyze the international and domestic effects of the Iranian Hostage Crisis by creating and completing an effects graphic organizer. (POL 6)(WOR-8)

• Working in groups, research and do a class presentation showing at least 2 causes and 2 effects of the end of the Cold War. (WOR-8)( POL-6)

• Create an advertisement presenting the philosophy and objectives of Focus on the Family. (ID-7)(CUL-5)

• Analyze the Presidency of Ronald Reagan by completing a president profile chart.

• Complete a compare and contrast chart of 1980s conservative and New Deal philosophies on the role of government. (WXT-8)

• Summarize the arms reduction agreements initiated by Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev. (POL-6)

• Complete a compare and contrast chart on Cold War and Post- 911 national security policies. (WOR-8)

• Using SOAPSTone, students will analyze the following document and evaluate the extent to which President Reagan met his goals: Ronald Reagan: First Inaugural Address (1981).

• Working in pairs research topics from 1980-present and formulate interview questions. These questions will be critiqued by the teacher and will be used as the basis for interviews with four adults. Each group will do a class presentation of its findings.

• Compare the domestic and foreign policies of the Clinton, Bush Jr., and Obama administrations in a FRO essay.
AP Exam Review Period

The second semester concludes with a period of review for the Advanced Placement U.S.

History Exam. Students will then take a practice exam.

Post AP Exam Period

Students compare documentary and feature films about historical events. The

response paper they write counts as their second semester final exam grade.


2014-15 A.P. U.S. History Content to be Mastered:

1st Quarter: Colonial America, War for Independence, & Establishment of The Republic

Unit thesis questions to answer via thesis and outline or chart:

Explain how 3 events/conditions fueled the Age of Exploration, then identify four European colonial powers.

Identify and contrast one advanced Pre-Columbian Native civilization with a more primitive one.

Explain 3-4 major differences between the Virginia and Massachusetts colonies.

Evaluate the impact of the First Great Awakening.

Describe the roots, participants, major facts, and result of the European power struggle in North America.

Identify 3 major Colonial economies/industries, then explain how Britain shaped or influence Colonial trade.

Defend British Colonial policies enacted from 1763-1776.

Evaluate the patriotic contributions of three famous patriots.

Explain two ways the Declaration of Independence helped the cause for American independence.

Analyze why/how the Patriots “won”, and the British “lost”.

Evaluate the efficacy of the Articles of Confederation (as a nation builder) from three perspectives.

Describe 3 problems/issues debated at the Constitutional Convention. How were the issues resolved?

Evaluate the following: “From about 1650-1795 Americans were generally a rebellious lot.”

Explain 2 conditions/events that led to the development of political parties in the U.S..

Analyze Thomas Jefferson’s ability to follow his convictions & standards as president. (Support thesis 3 ways.)

Relate one root, two military facts, and two impacts of the War of 1812.

Evaluate the following: “From 1776-1824, the U.S. displayed all the characteristics of a newly developing nation.”


1st Quarter Identifications (cause, facts, & impact):

Beringia

Woodland, Cahokia, & Aztecs

Renaissance



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