U annex-2 G25. 19 Water resources engineering 3(3-0) Elective Rationale



Download 225.07 Kb.
Page1/2
Date06.08.2017
Size225.07 Kb.
  1   2
U
ANNEX-2
G25.19 WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING
3(3-0) Elective
Rationale: This course is designed to provide a firm foundation in the concepts in water resources engineering and to prepare interested students for future careers in water supply, hydropower, and river engineering management.
Catalogue Description: Water Withdrawals and Uses; Water distribution; Hydropower engineering; Reservoir design and optimization; River engineering and sedimentation
Pre-Requisites: Fluid Mechanics, Hydrology
Course outline:


  1. Water Withdrawals and Uses

  1. Water use classification

  2. Water for energy

  3. Water for agriculture

  4. Water supply/withdrawals




  1. Water Distribution

  1. Water distribution systems

  2. Pipe flow equation

  3. System components

  4. Hydraulics of simple networks

  5. Pump systems analysis

  6. Network simulation

  7. Hydraulic transients




  1. Hydropower Engineering

  1. Principles of hydropower engineering

  2. Hydropower water conveyance system

  3. Determining energy potential




  1. Reservoir Design and Optimization

  1. Surface-water reservoir systems

  2. Mass curve analysis

  3. Sequent peak analysis

  4. Reservoir operation rules

  5. Reservoir simulation




  1. River Engineering and Sedimentation

  1. Sediment sources and sediment characteristics

  2. Bed forms and flow resistance

  3. Sediment transport

  4. Bed load formulas

  5. Suspended load formulas

  6. Total load

  7. Watershed sediment yield

  8. Reservoir sedimentation

  9. River training and riverbank protection works

  10. Sediment control devices


Textbook & Materials:
Linseley R.K., Franzini J.B., Freygerg D.L., and Tchobanoglous G. (1992):

Water-Resources Engineering, McGraw Hill Book Co.

Mays L. W. (2005):



Water Resources Engineering, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Grading: Assignments (20%) Midsem Exam (30%) Final Exam (50%)

Instructor: Dr. Mukand S. Babel
UG25.20 WATER SUPPLY AND WASTEWATER ENGINEERING 3(3-0) Elective
Rationale: To introduce students to the principles of public health engineering, water and wastewater treatment, water supply systems, wastewater disposal systems, stormwater systems, biosolids treatment and management, and water quality and contamination indicators.
Catalogue Description: Water/Wastewater Sources, Quantity and Quality; Water Supply/Distribution Systems; Wastewater/Sewage Collection and Disposal Systems; Wastewater Treatment; Wastewater Treatment Plant Characteristics; Natural Wastewater Treatment Systems; Groundwater and Surface Water Treatment for Potable Water Supply
Pre-Requisites: None
Course Outline:

  1. Water/Wastewater Sources, Quantity and Quality

  1. Sources of water supply and wastewater

  2. Water demand for various purposes

  3. Population forecasting by various methods

  4. Estimation of wastewater flows and variation in wastewater flows

  5. Estimation of storm water quantity

  6. Water/wastewater quality parameters and quality standard for various water uses

  7. Water/wastewater treatment




  1. Water Supply/Distribution Systems

  1. Selection of source of water supply

  2. Pressure and gravity distribution systems

  3. Design of water distribution systems




  1. Wastewater/Sewage Collection and Disposal Systems

  1. Wastewater collection

  2. Design of sewerage systems

  3. Design of low cost sanitation

  4. Discharge of sewage in streams/lakes

  5. Wastewater recycling and reuse




  1. Wastewater Treatment

  1. Wastewater characteristics

  2. Physical methods of wastewater treatment

  3. Chemical methods of wastewater treatment

  4. Biological methods of wastewater treatment

  5. Sludge treatment




  1. Wastewater Treatment Plant Characteristics

  1. Sequencing of unit operations and processes

  2. Plant layout

  3. Hydraulic considerations




  1. Natural Wastewater Treatment Systems

  1. Ponds and lagoons

  2. Wetlands and root-zone systems




  1. Groundwater and Surface Water Treatment for Potable Water Supply

  1. Water characteristics

  2. Plant layout and sequencing of unit operations and processes

  3. Hydraulic considerations


Textbook & Materials:
McGhee T. J. (1991):

Water Supply and Sewerage, McGraw-Hill.

Morgan P. (1990):



Rural Water Supplies and Sanitation, MACMILLAN EDUCATION LTD.

Qasim S. R., Motley E. M., and Zhu G. (2000):



Water Works Engineering – Planning, Design and Operation, Prentice-Hall PTR, Upper Saddle River.
Grading: Assignments (30%) Midsem Exam (30%) Final Exam (40%)
Instructor: Dr. Sangam Shrestha

UG25.21 FUNDAMENTALS OF COASTAL ENGINEERING 3(3-0) Elective
Rationale: Coastal engineering has become increasingly important with more and more people living or working at or near the world's coasts. Problems associated with coastal development will require the expertise and innovation of coastal engineers. This course provides basic knowledge of coastal engineering, which is concerned with the study of waves and currents and their effect on coastal structures.
Catalog Description: Linear Wave Theory; Wave Transformation; Long Period Sea Waves; Wave Forces on Structures
Pre-Requisites: None
Course outline:


  1. Introduction

  1. Historical background of coastal engineering

  2. Subjects to be treated in coastal engineering

  3. Wave characteristics




  1. Linear Wave Theory

  1. Basic equations of water waves

  2. Small amplitude wave theory and standing waves

  3. Irregular waves

  4. Wave spectrum




  1. Wave Transformation

  1. Transformation of waves in shallow water

  2. Bottom friction

  3. Breaking wave

  4. Wave setdown and setup

  5. Wave runup, overtopping and transmission on beach and structures




  1. Long Period Sea Waves

  1. Tide

  2. Storm surge

  3. Tsunamis

  4. Oscillations in bays and harbors




  1. Wave Forces on Structures

  1. Stability of rubble mound structure

  2. Wave pressure on vertical structures

  3. Wave forces on pile structures


Textbook & Materials:
Sorensen R. M. (2005):

Basic Coastal Engineering, 3rd edition, Springer.
Grading: Assignments (10%) Midsem Exam (40%) Final Exam (50%)
Instructor: Dr. Sutat Weesakul
UG25.22 GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING 3(3-0) Elective
Rationale: In the modern world of expanding populations, climate change, renewable energy, and sustainability, groundwater is an ever more important resource and offers promising career opportunities. This course provides an understanding of groundwater occurrence, groundwater flow and contaminant transport mechanisms through saturated and unsaturated zones, modeling of groundwater flow and contaminant transport and groundwater resources evaluation and management issues.
Catalogue Description: Groundwater Hydrology; Contaminant Hydrology; Coupled Flow and Transport; Well Hydraulics; Groundwater Evaluation and Management
Pre-Requisites: None
Course Outline:


  1. Introduction

  1. Groundwater in the hydrologic cycle

  2. Aquifers and their basic properties

  3. Recharge areas, discharge areas, and groundwater divides

  4. Groundwater budget




  1. Groundwater Hydrology

  1. Darcy’s Law and hydraulic potential

  2. Basic continuity equation

  3. Streamlines and flow nets

  4. Confined and unconfined flows

  5. Initial and boundary conditions

  6. Groundwater-surface water interactions

  7. Groundwater flow modeling




  1. Contaminant Hydrology

  1. Geochemistry and groundwater pollution

  2. Contaminant transport mechanisms and equations

  3. Effects of concentration gradients (Fick’s Law)

  4. Modeling of contaminant transport

  5. Geochemical tracers, stable isotopes




  1. Coupled Flow and Transport

  1. Density driven flow, freshwater/saltwater interaction

  2. Heat transport and groundwater flow

  3. Unsaturated zone hydrology

  4. Flow equations (retention curves and Richard’s equation)

  5. Infiltration and evapotranspiration

  6. Mathematical models




  1. Well Hydraulics

  1. Well construction, hydraulics and testing

  2. Pumping tests and slug tests

  3. Thiem and Thies equations

  4. Partially penetrating wells

  5. Multiple well systems

  6. Capture zone analysis




  1. Groundwater Evaluation and Management

  1. Exploration of aquifers

  2. Groundwater development and consequences

  3. Groundwater management issues


Textbook & Materials:
Schwartz F.W. & Zhang H. (2003):

Fundamentals of Ground Water, Wiley.

Kashef A.I. (1986):



Groundwater Engineering, McGraw Hill, New York.
Grading: Assignments (30%) Midsem Exam (30%) Final Exam (40%)
Instructor: Dr. Sangam Shrestha

UG25.23 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT 3(3-0) Elective
Rationale: This course provides a firm foundation in water excess management concepts, storm water control, economics in water resources, linear programming for water resources, integrated water resources management and planning.
Catalogue Description: Flood Control; Stormwater Control; Drought Management; Water Quality; Engineering Economy in Water Resources; Linear Programming Application in Water Resources; Integrated Water Resource Management; Water Resources Planning
Pre-Requisites: Hydrology, Engineering Economics
Course outline:


  1. Flood Control

  1. Introduction to floods

  2. Floodplain management

  3. Flood control alternatives

  4. Flood damage and net benefit estimation




  1. Stormwater Control

  1. Stormwater management

  2. Storm systems

  3. Stormwater drainage channels

  4. Storm water detention




  1. Drought Management

  1. Drought management options

  2. Drought severity

  3. Economic aspects of water shortage




  1. Water Quality

  1. Water pollution

  2. Basic parameters of water

  3. Inorganic and organic chemicals

  4. Water quality management




  1. Engineering Economy in Water Resources

  1. Benefit-cost analysis

  2. Evaluation of alternatives

  3. Price elasticity of water demand

  4. Demand models




  1. Linear Programming Applications in Water Resources

  1. Introduction to linear programming

  2. Linear programming model

  3. Assumptions of linear programming

  4. Simplex method for linear programming




  1. Water Resources Planning

  1. Levels of planning

  2. Phases and objectives

  3. Data requirements

  4. Project formulation and evaluation

  5. Environmental considerations

  6. Systems analysis

  7. Multi-purpose projects




  1. Integrated Water Resource Management

  1. What is IWRM?

  2. IWRM principles

  3. Concept of integration

  4. Socio-economic and environmental consideration

  5. Institutional arrangement

  6. Management instruments

  7. Participatory approach and decentralization




  1. Case Studies


Textbook & Materials:
Linseley, R.K., Franzini, J.B., Freygerg, D.L., and Tchobanoglous G. (1992):

Water-Resources Engineering, McGraw Hill Book Co.

Mays, L. W. (2005):



Water Resources Engineering, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
References:
Hillier F. S. and Lieberman G. J. (2001):

Introduction to Operation Research, McGraw Hill Book Co.

Cech T. V. (2009):



Principles of Water Resources: History, Development, Management, and Policy,

3rd edition, John Wiley and Sons Inc.

Stephenson D. (2003):

Water Resources Management, Swets and Zeitlinger B.V. Lisse, The Netherlands.

Chandrakumar G. and Mukundan N. (2006):



Water Resources Management: Thrust and Challenges, Sarup and Sons.
Grading: Assignments (20%) Midsem Exam (30%) Final Exam (50%)

Instructor: Dr. Mukand S. Babel

UG25.24 IRRIGATION ENGINEERING 3(2-1) Elective
Rationale: This course provides students with fundamental knowledge of irrigation and drainage engineering. It covers the topics of basic soil-plant-water relationships, planning and design of irrigation and drainage systems, irrigation and drainage structures, flow measurements and pump selection and operation.
Catalogue Description: Soil-Plant-Water Relationships; Irrigation Planning and Development; Design of Irrigation Systems; Design of Drainage Systems; Irrigation and Drainage Structures; Flow Measurements; Selection and Operation of Pumps
Pre-Requisites: None
Course Outline:


  1. Soil-Plant-Water Relationships

  1. Soil properties

  2. Evapotranspiration

  3. Soil water balance

  4. Crop water requirements




  1. Irrigation Planning and Development

  1. Feasibility studies

  2. Land resource assessment

  3. Irrigation potential (water sources)

  4. Project appraisal and implementation




  1. Design of Irrigation Systems

  1. Types of farm irrigation systems

  2. Irrigation methods

  3. Surface irrigation (furrow, flooding)

  4. Overhead irrigation (sprinkler)

  5. Sub-surface irrigation (drip)




  1. Design of Drainage Systems

  1. Agricultural drainage

  2. Main drainage systems

  3. Design of open channels

  4. Design of pipe drains




  1. Irrigation and Drainage Structures

  1. Dam (reservoir)

  2. Canal network (main, secondary, tertiary)

  3. Canal structures (falls, check dams, regulators, intake/offtake, etc.)

  4. Cross drainage structures (culverts, siphons, super passages, inlets/outlets, drop structures, etc.)

  5. Canal outlets (pipe, weirs, CHO, etc.)




  1. Flow Measurements

  1. Flow measuring devices

  2. Flow measurement in open channels (current meters, weirs, flumes, orifices)

  3. Flow measurement in pipelines (flow meters, pitot tubes, etc)




  1. Selection and Operation of Pumps

  1. Types of irrigation pumps

  2. Rating curves for pumps

  3. Pump selection

  4. Pump power requirement

  5. Pump operation and maintenance


Laboratory Session:


  1. Determination of soil bulk density and particle size distribution

  2. Soil moisture measurement techniques

  3. Hydraulic conductivity tests

  4. Design and evaluation of sprinkler irrigation system

  5. Design and evaluation of trickle irrigation system

  6. Design and evaluation of surface/subsurface drainage systems


Textbook & Materials:
Asawa G. L. (1992):

Irrigation Engineering. Wiley Eastern Limited, New Delhi.

Ritzema H. P. (Editor-in-Chief) (1994):



Drainage Principles and Applications, ILRI publication 16, International Institute for Land Reclamation and Improvement, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
References:
Ali I. (1993):

Irrigation and Hydraulic Structures: Theory, Design, and Practice. IEER, NED University of Engineering and Technology, Pakistan.

Bos M. (1989):



Discharge Measurement Structures, ILRI Publication 20, The Netherlands.

Cuenca R. H. (1989):



Irrigation System Design: An Engineering Approach, Prentice Hall, NJ.

International Commission on Irrigation and Drainage (ICID) (1998):



Planning the Management, Operation and Maintenance of Irrigation and Drainage Systems. World Bank Technical Paper No. 389. World Bank, Washington D.C.

James L. (1988):



Principles of Farm Irrigation System Design, John Wiley and Sons, New York.

Jensen M. E. (1983):



Design and Operation of Farm Irrigation Systems, Monograph No. 3, ASAE.

Kay M. (1986):



Surface Irrigation Systems and Practice. Cranfield Press, UK

Murty V. V. N. (1998):



Land and Water Management Engineering, 2nd Ed. Kalyani Publishers, India

Novak P., Moffat A. I. B., Nalluri C., and Narayanan R. (1990):



Hydraulic Structures. Unwin Hyman, London.

Rydzewski J. R. (1987):



Irrigation Development Planning: An Introduction for Engineers, John Wiley and Sons, London.
Grading: Laboratory and assignments (30%) Midsem Exam (30%) Final Exam (40%)
Instructor: Dr. R.S. Clemente
UG25.25 HYDROLOGICAL MODELING 3(2-1) Elective
Rationale: This course is designed to provide students with knowledge of the use of mathematical models in hydrological analysis and to provide an overview of several well-recognized and popular computer models for water resources development, planning, and management.

Catalogue Description: Introduction to Modeling; Modeling Process; Modeling in Hydrology; Watershed Delineation; Theory of Hydrologic Modeling

Pre-requisites: Hydrology

Course Outline:

  1. Introduction to Modeling

  1. What is modeling?

  2. Physical and mathematical modeling




  1. Modeling Process

  1. Steps in modeling

  2. Calibration and validation

  3. Sensitivity analysis




  1. Modeling in Hydrology

  1. Why are hydrological models needed?

  2. Hydrologic system analysis and modeling

  3. Classification of hydrologic models

  4. Use of hydrologic models

  5. Methodology for using hydrologic models




  1. Watershed Delineation

  1. Introduction to watersheds

  2. GIS and digital elevation models

  3. Watershed delineation using GIS




  1. Theory of Hydrologic Modeling

  1. Precipitation modeling methods

  2. Loss methods

  3. Estimation of evapotranspiration

  4. Runoff modeling methods

  5. Routing methods


Laboratory Sessions:

  1. Watershed delineation using GIS

  2. Rainfall-runoff models

  3. Flow routing models

  4. Hydrologic statistical models (frequency analysis models)

  5. Reservoir operation and stream flow simulation models

Textbook & Materials:
Singh V. P. (1995):

Computer Models of Watershed Hydrology, Water Resources Publications, Colorado, USA.
Handouts and computer program manuals provided by the instructor
Grading: Laboratory and assignments (30%) Midsem Exam (20%) Final Exam (50%)
Instructor: Dr. Mukand S. Babel
UG25.26 ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS 3(3-0) Elective
Rationale: This advanced course is designed for civil engineers with a desire to be the builders of technology. This course aims to equip students with methodologies and techniques in line with the fast development of computing technology in civil engineering. A semester project is assigned to each group of two students to develop a software module to solve a specific advanced topic in structural analysis.
Catalogue Description: Modeling of Structural Systems; Matrix Force Method; Matrix Displacement Method; Direct Stiffness Method; Advanced Techniques in Direct Stiffness Method; Introduction to Nonlinear Structural Analysis
Prerequisites: Structural Analysis II
Course outline:


  1. Modeling of Structural Systems

  1. Discrete modeling of structures

  2. Discrete modeling of loads

  3. Statics and kinematics requirements for a structural system




  1. Matrix Force Method

  1. Description of force method

  2. Member flexibility matrix

  3. Formulation of matrix force method

  4. Temperature effects in matrix force method




  1. Matrix Displacement Method

  1. Description of displacement method

  2. Member stiffness matrix

  3. Formulation of matrix displacement method

  4. Temperature effects in matrix displacement method




  1. Direct Stiffness Method

  1. Kinematics in different coordinate systems

  2. Stiffness matrix of a beam in 2D space

  3. Stiffness matrix of some simple 1D elements

  4. Formation of the global stiffness equations

  5. The general assembly procedure

  6. Modification for prescribed degree of freedoms

  7. Computer implementation of the direct stiffness method

  8. Temperature effects in direct stiffness method




  1. Advanced Techniques in Direct Stiffness Method

  1. Modification of element stiffness matrix for member end releases

  2. The rigid zones at member ends

  3. Static condensation of stiffness matrices

  4. Sub structuring technique

  5. Imposition of constraint conditions




  1. Introduction to Nonlinear Structural Analysis

  1. Material nonlinearity, geometric nonlinearity

  2. Concept of geometric stiffness

  3. Geometric stiffness for bar element and beam element

  4. Stability analysis of frame structures


Textbook & Materials:
Weaver W. and Gere J.M. (1990):

Matrix Analysis of framed structures, 3rd edition. Von Nastrand, New York.

Przemieniecki J. S. (1968):



Theory of Matrix Structural Analysis, Dover, New York.

Neville A. M. and Brown T. G. (2003):



Structural analysis: a unified classical and matrix approach, 5th edition, Spon Press, London.
Grading: Assignments (20%) Midsem Exam (20%) Project (30%) Final Exam (30%)
Instructor: Dr. Punchet Thammarak
UG25.28 DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURE 3(3-0) Elective
Rationale: This course is concerned with the behavior and the processes of design of steel members and structures. Students will gain practical and comprehensive experience through assigned semester project in the design of a simple steel structure.
Catalogue Description: Introduction to Steel Structure Design; Design of Tension Members; Design of Compression Members; Design of Beam Members; Design of Beam - Column Members; Design of Connections
Prerequisites: None
Course outline:


  1. Introduction to Steel Structure Design

  1. Material properties of steel

  2. Design concepts of steel structures

  3. ASD, plastic and LRFD

  4. Building codes and specifications for steel design




  1. Design of Tension Members

  1. Typical tension members

  2. Design criteria

  3. Net and gross areas, effective area

  4. Design of tension members: Threaded rods, cables and pin connected members




  1. Design of Compression Members

  1. Column behavior and modes of buckling failure

  2. Influence of end conditions, effective length

  3. Design of compression members

  4. Local buckling




  1. Design of Beam Members

  1. Beam behavior and modes of failure

  2. Moment and shear capacity of beams

  3. Flexural stability and lateral torsional buckling

  4. Serviceability requirements

  5. General and simplified design procedures




  1. Design of Beam - Column Members

  1. Beam-column behavior

  2. Moment amplification analysis

  3. Analysis and design of braced frames

  4. Analysis and design of unbraced frames

  5. Design of bracing elements




  1. Design of Connections

  1. Types of connections

  2. Design strength of bolts

  3. Analysis and design of bolted connections

  4. Design strength of welds

  5. Analysis and design of welded connections


Textbook & Materials:
AISC (1994)

AISC Manual of Steel Construction: Load and Resistance Factor Design, Second edition, 2nd LRFD edition, American Institute of Steel Construction.

Salmon C. G. and Johnson J. E. (1990):



Steel Structures: Design and Behavior: Emphasizing Load and Resistance Factor Design, 3rd edition, Harpercollins College Div.
Grading: Assignments (20%) Midsem Exam (20%) Project (30%) Final Exam (30%)
Instructor: Dr. Punchet Thammarak

UG25.29 INTRODUCTION TO STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS 3(3-0) Elective
Rationale: This course provides a basic understanding of the dynamic behavior of structures as well as the underlying principles of analysis.
Catalogue Description: Introduction; Dynamics of Single Degree of Freedom (SDOF) Systems; Free Vibration of SDOF Systems; Forced Vibration of SDOF Systems; Dynamics of Multi Degree of Freedom (MDOF) Systems; Free Vibration of MDOF Systems; Dynamic Response of MDOF Systems: Mode Superposition Method
Prerequisites: None
Course outline:


  1. Introduction

  1. Dynamical behavior of structures

  2. Methods of discretization

  3. Formulation of the equations of motion




  1. Dynamics of Single Degree of Freedom (SDOF) Systems

  1. SDOF approximation of vibrating systems

  2. Equation of motion

  3. Influence of support excitation




  1. Free Vibration of SDOF Systems

  1. Analysis of undamped free vibrations

  2. Analysis of viscous-damped free vibrations

  3. Free vibration of SDOF system with Coulomb damping




  1. Forced Vibration of SDOF Systems

  1. Response to harmonic excitation

  2. Response to periodic excitation

  3. Response to general dynamic excitation

  4. Numerical evaluation of dynamic response of SDOF systems




  1. Dynamics of Multi Degree of Freedom (MDOF) Systems

  1. Selection of the degrees of freedom

  2. Lumped-parameter models

  3. Formulation of equations of motion




  1. Free Vibration of MDOF Systems

  1. Free vibration of undamped MDOF systems

  2. Natural frequencies and modes

  3. Numerical evaluation of natural frequencies and modes of undamped MDOF systems




  1. Dynamic Response of MDOF Systems: Mode Superposition Method

  1. Normal coordinates

  2. Uncoupled equations of motion: Undamped

  3. Uncoupled Equations of Motion: Viscous damping

  4. Response analysis by mode displacement superposition


Textbook & Materials:
Chopra A. K. (2001):

Dynamics of Structures: Theory and Applications to Earthquake Engineering, 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall.

Clough R. W. and Penzlen J. (1993):



Dynamics of Structures, 2nd Ed., McGraw Hill, New York.

Smith J. W. (1988):



Vibration of Structures: Application in Civil Engineering Design, Chapman and Hall, London.
Grading: Assignments (30%) Midsem Exam (30%) Final Exam (40%)
Instructor: Dr. Pennung Warnitchai

UG25.30 ADVANCED REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES 3(3-0) Elective
Rationale: This is an advanced course on analysis and design of reinforced concrete structures. This course is designed for students looking towards a career in the structural engineering field. A semester project on the design of a multi-story and multi-bay reinforced concrete frame building is assigned to students to enhance their practical skills in analysis and design.
Course Description: Review Design of Concepts of Reinforced Concrete Structures; Strut-and-Tie Models; Analysis of Statically Indeterminate Beam and Frames; Analysis and Design of Slabs; Footings and Foundations
Prerequisites: Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures
Course outline:


  1. Review Design of Concepts of Reinforced Concrete Structures

  1. Stress-strain relationships for concrete and steel

  2. Limit state design

  3. Flexural capacity of RC beam

  4. Shear capacity of RC beam

  5. Capacity of RC beam subjected to combined flexural moment and axial force

  6. Interaction of shear, flexure and axial forces

  7. Torsion capacity of RC beam

  8. Combined flexure and torsion




  1. Strut-and-Tie Models

  1. Introduction

  2. Development of Strut-and-Tie models

  3. Strut-and-Tie design methodology

  4. Applications




  1. Analysis of Statically Indeterminate Beams and Frames

  1. Loading

  2. Simplifications in frame analysis

  3. Methods of elastic analysis

  4. Idealization of the structure

  5. Preliminary design and guidelines for proportioning members

  6. Approximate analysis – ACI moment coefficients




  1. Analysis and Design of Slabs

  1. Types of slabs

  2. Design of one-way slabs

  3. Temperature and shrinkage reinforcement

  4. Behavior of two-way edge-supported slabs

  5. Two-way column-supported slabs

  6. Direct design method for column-supported slabs

  7. Flexural reinforcement for column-supported slabs

  8. Equivalent frame method

  9. Shear design

  10. Transfer of moments at columns

  11. Openings in slabs

  12. Deflection calculations




  1. Footings and Foundations

  1. Types and functions

  2. Spread footings

  3. Design factors

  4. Loads, bearing pressures, and footing sizes

  5. Wall footings

  6. Column footings

  7. Combined footings

  8. Strip, grid and mat foundations

  9. Pile caps


Textbook & Materials:
ACI (2002):

Building Code Requirements for Structural Concrete (ACI 318-02) and Commentary, Amer. Concrete Inst.

Nilson A. H., Darwin D., and Dolan C. W. (2003):



Design of Concrete Structures, 13th edition.
Grading: Assignments (20%) Midsem Exam (20%) Project (30%) Final Exam (30%)
Instructor: To be announced
UG25.31 FUNDAMENTALS OF EARTH’S PHYSICS 3(2-1) Elective
Rationale: The course provides fundamental knowledge of Earth’s physics for those who would like to specialize further in geotechnical and earth resources engineering, geo-exploration and natural hazard preparedness and mitigation. It provides students with knowledge of the internal structure and dynamics of the earth considered in light of constraints from the gravitational and magnetic fields, seismology, and mineral physics.

Catalogue Description: The Earth as a Planet; Gravity, the Figure of the Earth and Geodynamics; Seismology and the Internal Structure of the Earth; Earth’s Age, Thermal and Electrical Properties; Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism; Applied Geophysics
Pre-Requisites: None

Course Outline:

  1. The Earth as a Planet

  1. The solar system

  2. The dynamic Earth




  1. Gravity, the Figure of the Earth and Geodynamics

  1. The Earth’s size and shape

  2. Gravitation

  3. The Earth’s rotation

  4. The Earth’s figure and gravity

  5. Gravity anomalies

  6. Interpretation of gravity anomalies

  7. Isostasy



  1. Seismology and the Internal Structure of the Earth

  1. Introduction

  2. Elasticity theory

  3. Seismic waves

  4. The seismograph

  5. Earthquake seismology

  6. Seismic wave propagation

  7. Internal structure of the Earth



  1. Earth’s Age, Thermal and Electrical Properties

  1. Geochronology

  2. The Earth’s heat

  3. Geoelectricity




  1. Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism

  1. Historical introduction

  2. The physics of magnetism

  3. Rock magnetism

  4. Geomagnetism

  5. Magnetic survey

  6. Paleomagnetism




  1. Applied Geophysics

  1. Application of geophysics in global studies

  2. Regional geophysics

  3. Hydrogeophysics


Laboratory Sessions:


  1. Introduction to the field geophysical survey

  2. Presentation of geophysical data

  3. Laboratory geophysical measurements

  4. Seismic refraction

  5. Seismic reflection

  6. Resistivity measurement and electric survey

  7. Gravity survey

  8. Magnetic survey

  9. Integrated interpretation of geophysical data

  10. Geophysical survey report


Textbook & Materials:
Lowrie W. (2007).

Fundamentals of Geophysics, (2nd edition), Cambridge University Press.
Lecture notes & handouts by the instructor
Grading: Laboratory and assignments (30%) Midsem Exam (30%) Final Exam (40%)
Instructor: Dr. Pham Huy Giao
UG25.32 ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY 3(2-1) Elective
Rationale: Environmental geology examines the interaction between human activity and the natural environment. The course provides knowledge of geologic processes and the physical constituents of the Earth that are necessary to understand environmental problems on a local, regional and global scale. It plays a significant role in decision-making concerning the use of water, minerals, energy resources, and our response to and preparedness for natural hazards. The main objective of the course is to equip students with an understanding of how geology interacts with major environmental problems and issues facing people and society.
Catalogue Description: General Geology; Introductory Material and Environmental Concerns Related to Surface Geologic Processes; Environmental Concerns Related to Earthquakes and Volcanism; Environmental Concerns Related to Geologic Resources, and Soil and Groundwater Contamination; Environmental Concerns Related to Geologic Resources, and Soil and Groundwater Contamination
Pre-Requisites: None
Course Outline:


  1. General Geology

  1. Minerals and rocks

  2. Geological processes

  3. Geological structures

  4. Geological age




  1. Introductory Material and Environmental Concerns Related to Surface Geologic Processes

  1. Population dynamics and associated environmental pressures

  2. Soils formation, classification and associated concerns

  3. Mass wasting: forms, behaviors and concerns

  4. Fluvial processes: floods and more

  5. Shorelines: dynamics, deltas, barrier island complexes, engineering issues

  6. Karst terrains and associated environmental concerns




  1. Environmental Concerns Related to Earthquakes and Volcanism

  1. Plate tectonic theory - the how and why of earthquakes and volcanoes

  2. Seismology - the science of earthquakes

  3. Events and environmental concerns associated with earthquakes

  4. Earthquake prediction

  5. Earthquake engineering and zoning

  6. Volcanology - the science of volcanism

  7. Environmental concerns associated with volcanism, case histories

  8. Role of volcanic eruptions in global climate change




  1. Environmental Concerns Related to Geologic Resources, and Soil and Groundwater Contamination

  1. Basics of hydrogeology

  2. Wells, recharge rates and case histories of groundwater depletion

  3. Groundwater geochemistry, contamination, clean up and legal framework

  4. Energy resources, exploration, extraction, use and associated environmental concerns

  5. Nuclear energy and radioactive waste disposal

  6. Metallic resources and related environmental concerns

  7. Landfill design and solid waste disposal


Laboratory Sessions:


  1. Visual mineral identification

  2. Visual rock identification

  3. Mineral and rock identification under microscope

  4. GPS and Surveying

  5. Reading topographic maps

  6. Reading geological maps

  7. Structural geology exercises

  8. Plate tectonics and geological hazards exercises

  9. Groundwater flow and pumping test analysis

  10. Geological field visit/trip

The students are expected to join a field trip to get acquainted with rock and geological processes in the field.


Textbook & Materials:
Merritts D., Wet A. D., and Menking K. (1998):

Environmental Geology: an Earth System Science Approach, New York, NY: W.H. Freeman and Company.
Grading: Laboratory and assignments (30%) Midsem Exam (30%) Final Exam (40%)
Instructor: Dr. Pham Huy Giao and Dr. Noppadol Phien-wej


UG25.33 COMPUTATIONAL GEOTECHNICS 3(3-0) Elective
Rationale:  Nowadays civil engineers need to use computer technology and software for their professional work and global competencies. Many general- or specific-purpose computer software packages are used in geotechnical analysis, design and practice. This course provides civil engineering students with basic knowledge on how to apply the finite element method to solve traditional soil mechanics problems as well as practical geotechnical engineering problems.
Catalogue Description: Introduction to Computational Geotechnics; Elasticity and Plasticity; Stresses in Soil; Consolidation; Shear Strength of Soils; Shallow Foundations; Lateral Earth Pressure and Retaining Walls; Piles and Pile Groups; Permeability and Seepage
Pre-Requisites: None
Course Outline:


  1. Introduction to Computational Geotechnics

  1. Traditional soil mechanics problems

  2. Practical geotechnical engineering problems

  3. Finite element method and commercial software for geotechnical engineering design and analysis




  1. Elasticity and Plasticity

  1. Elasticity and plasticity

  2. Modified CAM clay model

  3. Stress and strain invariants

  4. Extended CAM clay model




  1. Stresses in Soil

  1. In situ stresses

  2. Stress increase in a semi-infinite soil mass caused by external loading

  3. Finite element analysis




  1. Consolidation

  1. One-dimensional consolidation theory

  2. Calculation of the ultimate consolidation settlement

  3. Finite element analysis of consolidation problems




  1. Shear Strength of Soil

  1. Direct and triaxial shear tests

  2. Field tests

  3. Drained and undrained loading conditions via finite element method




  1. Shallow Foundations

  1. Modes of failure

  2. Bearing capacity equations and finite element analysis




  1. Lateral Earth Pressure and Retaining Walls

  1. At-rest earth pressure

  2. Active and passive earth pressure

  3. Retaining wall design and finite element analysis




  1. Piles and Pile Groups

  1. Drained and undrained loading conditions

  2. Estimating the load capacity of piles

  3. Pile groups

  4. Settlements of single piles and pile groups

  5. Lateral loaded piles and pile groups

  6. Finite element analysis of piles and pile groups




  1. Permeability and Seepage

  1. Permeability and seepage

  2. Flow through embankments

  3. Finite element analysis of seepage


Textbook & Materials:
Helwany S. (2007):

Applied Soil Mechanics with ABAQUS Applications, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Grading: Assignments (50%) Midsem exam (20%) Final Exam (30%)
Instructor: Dr. Kyung-Ho Park


UG25.34 INTRODUCTION TO SOIL DYNAMICS 3(3-0) Elective
Rationale: Civil engineers are increasingly challenged to solve the geotechnical problems under dynamic and seismic loading conditions. This course provides civil engineering students with basic knowledge of soil dynamics and geotechnical earthquake engineering.
Catalogue Description: Seismology and Earthquakes; Dynamics of Single Degree of Freedom Systems; Foundation Vibration; Strong Ground Motion; Site Amplification and Ground Response Analysis; Soil Liquefaction; Seismic Slope Stability
Pre-Requisites: None
Course Outline:


  1. Introduction

  1. Basic concepts in soil dynamics and geotechnical earthquake engineering

  2. Seismic hazards




  1. Seismology and Earthquakes

  1. Reasons earthquakes occur

  2. Faults

  3. Definition of some earthquake-related terms




  1. Dynamics of Single Degree of Freedom Systems

  1. Free vibration of damped and undamped systems

  2. Forced vibration of damped and undamped systems

  3. Response spectrum concept




  1. Foundation Vibration

  1. Vertical vibration

  2. Vibration of embedded foundations systems

  3. Vibration screening




  1. Strong Ground Motion

  1. Measurement, properties and variability of strong ground motions

  2. Estimation of ground motion parameters

  3. Local site effects on strong ground motions




  1. Site Amplification and Ground Response Analysis

  1. Simplified site amplification procedures

  2. Dynamic soil properties

  3. One dimensional equivalent linear site response analysis




  1. Soil Liquefaction

  1. Definition of soil liquefaction, soils vulnerable to liquefaction

  2. Assessment of liquefaction potential, liquefaction induced displacements




  1. Seismic Slope Stability

  1. Pseudostatic approach

  2. Newmark’s sliding block analysis


Textbook & Materials:
Kramer S.L. (1996):

Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering, Prentice Hall.

Verruijt A. (2010):



An Introduction to Soil Dynamics, Springer.
Grading: Assignments (50%) Midsem exam (20%) Final Exam (30%)
Instructor: Dr. Kyung-Ho Park

UG25.35 FINITE ELEMENT METHOD AND APPLICATIONS IN GEOENGINEERING & GEOEXPLORATION 3(3-0)

Elective
Rationale: This course introduces the basics of the finite method and its application in solving a series of practical geo-problems, including consolidation analysis, groundwater flow modeling, heat flow and electric flow analyses. The course is suitable for advanced undergraduate students, especially those who would like to pursue graduate study in geoengineering and geoexploiration.
Catalogue Description: Basic Concepts of the Finite Element Method; Finite Element Formulation; Programming the Finite Element (FE) Method; FEM Formulation and Analysis of Consolidation; FEM Formulation and Analysis of Groundwater Flow; FEM Formulation and Analysis of Heat Flow; FEM Formulation and Analysis of Electric Flow
Prerequisites: None
Course outline:


Download 225.07 Kb.

Share with your friends:
  1   2




The database is protected by copyright ©ininet.org 2020
send message

    Main page