Lea consolidated Application District Code



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LEA Consolidated Application 

District Code: 

625 

District Name: 

Chatham County 

Fiscal Year: 

2016










Plan Descriptors

LEA has reviewed the Plan and no changes have been made for this school year.

1. Title I, Part A; Title I, Part C; Title I, Part D; Title II, Part A and Part D; Title III; Title IV; IDEA; Perkins; EHCY

A description of the process the LEA used to determine the academic needs of its student body including the unique needs of students served through each applicable federal program. An analysis of the results should be included.

LEA Narrative Description 1

The District Accountability System (DAS) provides the framework for the school system’s strategic planning process. It incorporates the Mission and Vision statements, Guiding Principles, and Strategic Goals as approved by the Board of Education for the City of Savannah and the County of Chatham. The current DAS will remain in effect until September 2015, at which time an updated DAS aligned to the district’s Passport to Excellence 2020 Strategic Business Plan will be presented for Board approval. Both the DAS and Strategic Business Plan will support the Strategic Waivers Flexibility Option selected by the district in June 2015. In both its current and updated forms, the DAS is designed to serve at the reporting, evaluation, and monitoring instrument that helps the district ensure that it is meeting the needs of its students and other stakeholders.

Mission: To ignite a passion for learning and teaching at high levels

Vision: From school to the world: All students prepared for productive futures

Guiding Principles are the shared values and management style of the organization. They articulate the ethical standards by which the organization makes decisions and conducts activities.

The following seven Guiding Principles were adopted by the Board on April 2, 2008 and are incorporated into Board Policy BA/BA-R, Goals and Objectives:

GUIDING PRINCIPLE 1: The school board provides guidance and support to schools by establishing clear goals, aligned policies, high standards, and effective systems of evaluation which produce accountability and results

GUIDING PRINCIPLE 2: The academic achievement of students will be at a level that will enable them, upon graduation from high school, to enter college or the work force fully prepared to be successful—without need of remediation.

GUIDING PRINCIPLE 3: Education is a shared responsibility between home, school and community.

GUIDING PRINCIPLE 4: A safe, secure and orderly environment is essential for teaching and learning.

GUIDING PRINCIPLE 5: All children can learn and achieve at high levels but may learn at different rates or learning styles.

GUIDING PRINCIPLE 6: Fiscal responsibility and accountability must be maintained at all times.

GUIDING PRINCIPLE 7: Positive relationships are built through honesty and respect which enhance cooperation, safety and well-being of students, families and staff.

Strategic Goal 1 –To ensure all students are college and career ready (Academic Achievement)

Strategic Goal 2 – To ensure fiscal responsibility and effective resource stewardship

Strategic Goal 3 – To provide a safe and secure environment for students and employees

Strategic Goal 4 – To engage parents and community stakeholders

Supporting each of the Board’s Strategic Goals are one or more objectives with specific measures and performance targets. These objectives specify what the Superintendent and District staff will be doing to accomplish each of the Board’s Strategic Goals. Following are the goals and some objectives that are in place to achieve each goal:

Strategic Goal 1:

Objective A – Reading on Grade Level (ROGL) – to increase the percentage of students who are reading on grade level by the end of grades 2, 4, and 7 measured by a Lexile reading scale score of 330L, 630L, and 880L respectively as measured by the Scholastic Reading Inventory assessment (SRI). Target SY 14-15 ROGL rates are 76% for grade 2; 77% for grade 4; and 75% for grade 7.

Numeracy on Grade Level (NOGL) – to increase the percentage of students meeting numeracy on grade level by the end of grades 2, 4, and 7 as measured by a RIT scale score of 186, 207, and 224 respectively as measured by the NWEA Measures of Academic Progress (MAP). Target SY 16-7 NOGL rates are 80% for grade 2; 80% for grade 4; and 73% for grade 7.

Objective B – Georgia Milestones Assessment System End of Grade Test (GMAS-EOG) – to increase the percentage of students meeting or exceeding standard in the core content areas as measured by the GMAS-EOG examination administered in Grades 3, 5, and 8. SY 18-19 targets are TBD pending release of the baseline GMAS results.

Objective D – Graduation Rate – To increase the district graduation rate using the cohort-based formulas as reported by the Georgia Department of Education (GADoE) and the 5-year extended cohort rate.

TARGET – by 2014 the district cohort graduation rate will be 70% or higher and the district 5-year extended cohort rate will be 80% or higher.

Objective H – College and Career Readiness Performance Index (CCRPI) – to increase the district and schools` college and career score as measured and reported by the Georgia Department of Education (GADoE)

TARGET – by the end of SY2016-17 grades 2-5 will have a score of 75 70.3 or over, grades 6-8 will have a score of 70 or over, and grades 9-12 will have a score of 73 or over.

Objective J – End of Pathway Assessment (EOPA) – to increase the percentage of CTAE pathway completers earning a national industry-recognized credential or a passing score on an end of pathway assessment. By SY 16-17 the target pass rate will be greater than or equal to 50%.

Strategic Goal 2:

Objective A – Stewardship of Transportation – to improve the success of student transportation meeting the published school arrival schedule within + 15 minutes and the school departure schedule within + 10 minutes, and to improve the cost efficiency of student transportation as measured by total transportation cost by total student riders. Target SY 16-17 on-time transportation rate is 98% and the target district cost per rider is $693.

Objective B – Stewardship of Food Nutrition – to increase student participation in the breakfast and lunch program, and to improve cost efficiency of the school nutrition program. Target SY 16-17 breakfast participation rate is 35%; target lunch participation rate is 70%; target food cost per revenue is no more than 37% and target labor cost per revenue is no more than 45%.

Objective D - Stewardship of Human Resources –

Objective D.a. – By SY 14-15 the teacher attrition rate will be no more than 10% for the district and schools will be no more than 10% above the district average.

Objective D.b – By SY 14-15 the administrator attrition rate will be no more than 15% for the district and the classified attrition rate will be no more than 20% for the district.

Objective D.c - By SY 14-15 at least 99% of all classrooms will be staffed with Highly Qualified (HiQ) teachers as measured by the October Certified and Classified Personnel Information (CPI) data collection.

Objective D.d– By SY 14-15 all middle school core content area teachers will have their Reading Endorsement or Certification by June 2014 in order to provide literacy intervention strategies.

Objective E -Stewardship of Facilities –: to improve the utilization of the district`s facilities as measured by the percentage of capacity used, and to improve the efficiency of energy use as measured by utility cost and consumption per square foot. By SY 14-15 at least 80% of schools will be between 75%-90% of capacity and energy cost increases will be below the applicable rate of inflation. By SY 15-16 the district will reduce overall energy consumption by 5%.

Strategic Goal 3:

Objective A – Student Attendance: to reduce student absenteeism by decreasing the percentage of students with an absentee rate of 5% or higher. By SY 16-17 no more than 19% of students will have an absence rate of 5% or higher.

Objective B – School Discipline: to reduce the number of infractions that give rise to referrals for In School Suspension, Out of School Suspension, and expulsion to no more than 11,500 by SY 16-17.

Objective D – Weapons and Drugs: to decrease the number of weapons and drugs on school campuses as measured by official police reports to 45 or less in each category by SY 14-15.

Objective E – Student Well-being: to monitor and improve student well-being within the schools as measured by the Georgia Student Health Survey II, grades 6-12. By SY 16-17 student well-being rates will rise to at least 84%.

The items selected focus on students’ physical, psychological, and social well-being. The survey administered annually to students in grades 6- 12 and the Survey Window is from October – February.

Strategies

Executive Directors of School Governance and the Chief Academic Officer will work with school leadership teams to develop and implement transition programs designed to ensure that students develop a readiness to enter their new environments, to reduce anxiety, and to increase resilience.

Principals of all schools will continue to develop and enhance relationships in schools through the teaching of conflict resolution and other problem solving skills. They will also promote the use of classroom management strategies that are participatory, democratic, and focused on problem solving.

At the direction of the Executive Directors of School Governance, school administrators and school counselors will meet quarterly with students, staff, and families to address topics that impact the social, emotional and behavioral health of students.

Strategic Goal 4:

Objective A - Engaging our Students` Parents: to increase the level of interaction our school district and schools have with parents and members of the community. The attainment of this objective will be determined by detailing ten areas of measurement that are reflective of engagement activities. By SY 14-15 the measurement rubric score will increase to at least 34 of 50 possible points.

Objective B - Engaging the Community: to increase the number and value of business, faith community, civic league, post-secondary, and military partnerships. For SY 14-15 all schools will have 5 or more partnerships that demonstrate a quality relationship that advances the education of our students.

Objective C – Engagement through Mentoring & Tutoring: to increase the number of mentors and tutors available to our students by 10% annually.

Objective H – Perceptions of the District: to improve the overall perception of the district by parents, business partners, and community as measured by an annual climate survey
To determine and describe specific student academic achievement needs, the Savannah-Chatham County Public School System (SCCPSS) uses data from the following assessments:


  • The Georgia Milestone Assessment replaced the Criterion Referenced Competency Test (CRCT) and the End of Course Test (EOCT) assessments for the 2014-2015 school year. The assessment data is a lagging indicator for the 2015-2016 school year.

  • Student Learning Objectives (SLOs) (grades and subjects areas not assessed by the Georgia Milestone Assessment)

  • Georgia Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (GKIDS)

  • The district Kindergarten Checklist for eligibility in the Early Intervention Program (EIP)

  • The Georgia Alternative Assessment (GAA)

  • The Accessing Comprehension and Communication in English State to State (ACCESS) for English Learners (ELs)

  • Scholastic Reading Inventory (SRI) in grades 2 – 8

  • Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) in grades 2 - 8

  • Online Assessment System (OAS) in Science in grades 3 – 8 has been replaced by the Georgia Online Formative Assessment Resource (GOFAR) Science grades 4 and 7 and Social Studies grades 5 and 6.

  • Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) Grades K and 1

  • mClass DIBELS Grades K and 1(Math)

  • Advanced Placement (AP) subject tests

  • International Baccalaureate (IB) subject tests

  • CompassLearning (grades 2-8) (pending budget approval)

  • Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT)

  • American College Testing (ACT)

  • End of Pathway Assessments (CTAE)

The majority of the data from the above assessments are reported to SCCPSS by the Georgia Department of Education and national testing and assessment companies. These data are reported in disaggregated subgroups to provide site-level and district level staff with information that informs instructional practices and assists in the development of targeted instruction using data as the basis for decision-making. Typical data disaggregation include but are not limited to race/ethnicity, gender, students with disabilities, English learner, and economically disadvantaged subgroups.

As listed as Objective H of the 1st Strategic Goal, the College and Career Readiness Performance Index (CCRPI) reporting is calculated with appropriate indicators for elementary, middle, and high schools, and yields an in-depth analysis of students’ college and career readiness. It will measure the extent to which a school, school district, and the state are successfully making progress in a number of key areas, such as content mastery, student attendance, and the next level of preparation. Reward schools will include Title I schools showing the highest performance or progress. Georgia’s 2015 renewed ESEA waiver updated the criteria for identifying Priority, Focus, and Reward schools in order to align with the CCRPI and address the need to identify and fully support schools in order to raise student achievement, close achievement gaps, and promote continual progress toward full proficiency for all students. Reward schools will include Title I schools showing the highest performance as measured by the three-year average of CCRPI Content Mastery scores, and Title I schools showing the highest progress as measured by the three-year average of the CCRPI Progress scores. Priority schools include any 2012 Priority school that did not meet the exit criteria, high schools with a graduation rate less than 60 percent over two years, and Title I schools whose CCRPI Content Mastery three-year average is in the lowest 5% of Title I schools statewide. Focus Schools include any 2012 Focus school that did not meet the exit criteria, and Title I schools whose CCRPI Achievement gap three-year average is in the lowest 10% of Title I schools statewide. Alert schools will no longer be identified.

SCCPSS IMPACT SCHOOLS 2014-2015Eleven elementary schools were identified as Impact schools in 2014-2015 based on CCRPI scores. The following interventions were implemented for those schools and the results are presented below.


  • Differentiated Supervision (Impact ED)

  • Scheduling of Intervention Block

  • New Beginnings

  • Creation of Demonstration Schools

  • Principal Mentors

  • Research-Based Interventions

  • Individualized PD for all Schools

  • Central Office Walkthroughs

  • Instructional Audits (GAPPS Analysis)

  • More Rigorous Site Administrator Hiring Process

  • Advanced Hiring Cycle

  • Additional Staff •

  • State-of-the-School Presentations

Results:

MAP BOY EOY GAIN

Gadsden Elementary 21% 79% 58

Spencer Elementary 17% 68% 51

Garden City Elementary 30% 80% 50

Windsor Forest Elementary33% 82% 49

Port Wentworth Elementary 31% 76% 45

Thunderbolt Elementary 18% 61% 43

Haven Elementary 14% 56% 42

Hodge Elementary 14% 54% 40

Shuman Elementary 21% 58% 37

Brock Elementary 14% 46% 32

East Broad (Grades2-5) 10% 31% 21

SRI


Gadsden Elementary 28% 79% 51

Spencer Elementary 24% 67% 43

Thunderbolt Elementary 28% 66% 38

Port Wentworth Elementary 38% 75% 37

Shuman Elementary 25% 59% 34

Garden City Elementary 30% 63% 33

Windsor Forest Elementary 36% 68% 32

Haven Elementary 15% 45% 30

Hodge Elementary 24% 52% 28

East Broad (Gr.2-5) 18% 45% 27

Brock Elementary 24% 50% 26

Long-Term Suspension/Expulsion

There is a decrease of 57% in the percentage of students who were expelled/long-term suspended in our Impact Schools this (2014-2015) year over the 2013-2014 school year. This can be largely attributed to the successful New Beginnings Program implemented this year.

Lessons Learned

• Better use of resources is key

• Majority of principals sincerely want change and are willing to embrace it

• Intervention Block is crucial to reach all students at all levels

• New Beginnings Program is vital to decreasing long-term suspension/expulsion

NEXT STEPS 2015-2016


  • Implementation of Research-Based Math Intervention

  • School Improvement Specialists at the Opportunity Schools

  • Additional Days of Differentiated Professional Development

  • Additional Intervention Block for Mathematics

  • Behavior Specialists at Identified Schools

  • Continue to refine and enhance initiatives implemented this year

  • Consideration of innovative staffing approaches

The Georgia Department of Education has indicated that both Priority and Focus schools will be provided with three years of support and interventions from the state beginning in June of 2012. An option to have the designations removed early is available if schools on the list demonstrate dramatic improvement.

The system level administrators examine and disaggregate the test results of all students and subgroups. Test results of students identified as homeless will also be examined and disaggregated by system level administrators. These results are then presented in forums to the school board, local school staff members, parents, and community. Results shared with staff members at the local school level are used for assessment, evaluation, and instructional planning for both individual and group needs. One of the primary goals of SCCPSS is the effective use of assessment results in instruction. In pursuit of this goal, SCCPSS regularly schedules workshops and meetings to help staff members examine and use assessment results in planning student instruction. The test results are reported to the school board though the District Accountability System.

Following are assessment data for the 2014-2015 school year:


GEORGIA MILESTONES ASSESSMENT SYSTEM – END OF GRADE (GMAS-EOG)

Results for the GMAS are not yet available, and are anticipated to be released in October of 2015.


In February and March 2013, the Georgia Department of Education (GaDOE) convened committees of educators to review the achievement expectations for the Reading, English Language Arts, and Mathematics CRCT. These committees were charged with recommending a coherent system of readiness indicators to inform instructional planning and decision making. The committees considered the content standards, the test items included on the 2013 CRCT in each content area, as well as performance of Georgia students on other measures such as the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP).

The resulting CRCT readiness indicators recommended by the committees have been designed to send a signal to stakeholders about where students are relative to the higher expectations in the GSE/GPS; and provide feedback about students’ preparedness for the increase in rigor and expectation for student achievement that is on the horizon. The 2014 CRCT Readiness Indicators provide school systems with a view of how their students’ performance on the 2014 CRCT would have looked if these new readiness levels had been applied as cut scores on the CRCT, replacing the established cut scores of 800 for Meets Standard and 850 for Exceeds Standard.

Three readiness levels (Needs Additional Support, On Track, and Commendable) broadly describe students’ knowledge, skills, and abilities.


  • A student at the Needs Additional Support level has demonstrated that his or her command of knowledge and skills described in the GSE/GPS warrants additional instructional support.

  • A student at the On Track level has demonstrated that his or her command of the knowledge and skills described in the GSE/GPS is sufficient; the student is on track for success at the next level.

  • A student at the Commendable level has demonstrated that his or her command of the knowledge and skills described in the GSE/GPS is exemplary.

Performance Level Descriptors (PLDs)

  • The PLDs for the Readiness Indicators describe what a student is able to do at each readiness level.

  • These descriptions are organized by the domains within a content area and grade. The PLDs of the next higher readiness level can help classroom teachers determine what students need to work on next.

  • The PLDs are designed to provide a snapshot of the academic characteristics of typical students for each content standard.

  • The statements describe the knowledge and skills students typically demonstrate at each readiness level for a particular standard.

  • The PLDs provide a conceptual framework for educators of what the typical student knows and can do within each readiness level.

These range PLDs were designed to demonstrate a progression of learning and can be used by educators to design instructional activities that align with the content standards. In other words, what else does a student need to learn and demonstrate in order to move from the Needs Additional Support to On Track to Commendable with respect to a content standard? Based on the conversion calculations, the following has been reported:

READING


Grade 3 – 65% of the students are either on track or commendable

Grade 4 – 64% of the students are either on track or commendable

Grade 5 – 59% of the students are either on track or commendable

Grade 6 – 68% of the students are either on track or commendable

Grade 7 – 68% of the students are either on track or commendable

Grade 8 – 67% of the students are either on track or commendable


ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

Grade 3 – 57% of the students are either on track or commendable

Grade 4 – 55% of the students are either on track or commendable

Grade 5 – 64% of the students are either on track or commendable

Grade 6 – 64% of the students are either on track or commendable

Grade 7 – 68% of the students are either on track or commendable

Grade 8 – 66% of the students are either on track or commendable

MATHEMATICS

Grade 3 – 62% of the students are either on track or commendable

Grade 4 – 58% of the students are either on track or commendable

Grade 5 – 67% of the students are either on track or commendable

Grade 6 – 65% of the students are either on track or commendable

Grade 7 – 57% of the students are either on track or commendable

Grade 8 – 58% of the students are either on track or commendable

Several actions have been taken to ensure knowledge of and preparation for the new Georgia Milestones Assessments (referred to GMAS). The following list is not comprehensive.

AWARENESS

Principals and central office staff have discussed the GMAS information at parent meetings and staff meetings, providing updates as new information becomes available. Brochures on GMAS have been distributed widely. The district website is updated regularly to reflect the latest information on GMAS. Teaching and parent information resources are available to teachers and families on the district website. Teachers have received training and support in the writing process, with a focus on developing and using constructed and extended responses. Teachers are presenting questions that require constructed and extended responses in classroom assignments. Sample test items have been made available to all staff for use in their classroom-based assessments and for practice test sessions.

INSTRUCTIONAL FOCUS

Lessons and activities are based on the Georgia Performance Standards. Writing portfolios include works across the major content areas. Students are using rubrics to assess their own work. Students are engaged in hands-on, multi-step problem solving learning activities. Administrators are reviewing lesson plans and observing classroom activities to ensure higher order thinking skills and rigorous instruction. Professional development for all staff focuses on increasing rigor and the curriculum standards.

KEYBOARDING SKILLS (K-8)

Children’s typing software programs are used as part of morning work routine/computer lab. Teachers have incorporated typing into daily small group lessons. Students use typing games during designated periods to build proficiency.
SCHOLASTIC READING INVENTORY (SRI)

Based on the 2015 SRI report, 82% of second grade students, 80% of fourth grade students, and 79% of seventh grade students achieved the SRI benchmarks in reading. This shows gains in all three gateway grade levels by 9 points in 2nd grade, 6 points in 4th grade, and 7 points in 7th grade. All three grade levels met the SY 14-15 DAS performance target for Reading on Grade Level. Because reading comprehension is essential to academic learning, SCCPSS plans to continue to provide access to the SRI as a progress monitoring tool to students in grades 2-8 for the upcoming school term (SY 2015-16) and use scientifically researched and proven strategies in reading instruction for all students including students with disabilities.


READING ON GRADE LEVEL (ROGL) – Strategic Goal 1 Objective A

Objective: To increase the percentage of students who are reading on grade level by the end of grade 2, 4, and 7 as measured by a Lexile reading scale score of 330L, 630L, and 880L respectively. The measuring tool for grades 2, 4, and 7 is the Scholastic Reading Inventory Assessment (SRI).



  • A Lexile is a standard unit for measuring text complexity.

  • Readers’scores are reported as a Lexile measure from 0L to 2000L.

  • Lexile scores for this presentation are reported from the Scholastic Reading Inventory (SRI).

Sub group Proficiency Rates by gateway grades:

GRADE 2


Asian –- 2014 90% and 2015 – 92% - 2 point gain

Black 2014 – 6% - and 2015 – 76% - 11 point gain

Hispanic –2014- 62% and 2015- 82% - 20 point gain

Multiracial –2014 – 81% and 2015 – 90% - 9 point gain

White –88% and 2015 – 93% - 5 point gain

SWD –2014 – 49% and 2015 61% - 12 point gain

EL – 2014 – 52% and 2015 – 77% - 25 point gain
GRADE 4

Asian –2014 - 81% and 2015 – 93% - 12 point gain

Black –2014 – 67% and 2015 – 73% - 6 point gain

Hispanic –2014- 74% and 2015 – 76% - 2 point gain

Multiracial –2014 – 84% and 2015 – 88% - 4 point gain

White – 2013- 2014 – 89% and 2015 – 93% - 4 point gain

SWD – 2013 –2014 – 30% and 2015 51% - 21 point gain

EL – 2014 – 58% and 2015 – 51% - 7 point loss


GRADE 7

Asian –2014 - 90% and 2015 – 84%- 6 point loss

Black –2014 – 62% and 2015 – 73% - 11 point gain

Hispanic –2014- 77% and 2015 – 76% - 1 point loss

Multiracial –2014 – 85% and 2015 – 88% - 3 point gain

White –2014 – 89% and 2015 – 91%- 3point gain

SWD –2014 – 31% and 2015 – 43% - 12 point gain
MEASURES OF ACADEMIC PROGRESS (MAP)

Based on the 2015 MAP data, 76% of second grade students, 70% of 4th grade students, and 62% of 7th grade students met the numeracy on grade level benchmark. This reflects a gain of 1 point in 2nd grade and 3 points in 4th grade, and a 2 point decrease in 7th grade. The district is striving to achieve greater gains in our math outcomes, and plans to aggressively use scientifically researched and proven strategies in math instruction.


NUMERACY ON GRADE LEVEL (NOGL) Strategic Goal 1 Objective A

Objective: To increase the percentage of students meeting numeracy on grade level by the end of grade 2, 4, and 7 as measured by a RIT scale score of 186, 207, and 224 respectively. The measuring tool for grades 2, 4, and 7 is the NWEA Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)



  • SCCPSS students in grades 2 –8 take the NWEA-MAP assessment in math in the fall, winter and spring.

  • RIT scores range from 120 to 300.

  • RIT scores help us understand several dimensions of student performance, including:

  • Overall performance in mathematics

  • Strengths & weaknesses within domains

  • Projected performance on CRCT math (not applicable for 2014-2015 SY)

  • Student growth over time

  • Performance relative to other students (norm-referenced percentile ranks

Subgroup performance by gateway grades

GRADE 2

Asian –2014 - 96% and 2015 – 98% - 2 point gain



Black –2014 – 64% and 2015 – 65% - 1 point gain

Hispanic –2014- 83% and 2015 – 87% - 4 point gain

Multiracial –2014 – 87% and 2015-85% - 2 point loss

White –2014 – 89% and 2015 – 91% - 2 point gain

SWD –2014 – 57% and 2015 – 58% - 1 point gain

EL – 2014 – 81% and 2015 – 86% - 5 point gain


GRADE 4

Asian –2014 - 88% and 2015 -93% - 5 point gain

Black –2014 – 53% and 2015 -58% - 5 point gain

Hispanic –2014- 77% and 2015 -70% - 7 point loss

Multiracial 2014 – 80% and 2015 -82% - 2 point gain

White –2014 – 87% and 2015 -91% - 4 point gain

SWD –2014 – 36% and 2015 -46% - 10 point gain

EL – 2014 – 68% and 2015 – 58% - 20 point loss


GRADE 7

Asian –Asian –2014 - 92% and 2015 -87% - 5 point loss

Black –Black –2014 – 55% and 2015 -51% - 4 point loss

Hispanic –2014- 76% and 2015 -64% - 12 point loss

Multiracial –2014 – 88% and 2015 -73% - 15 point loss

White –2014 – 79% and 2015 -80% - 1 point loss

SWD –2014 – 17% and 2015 -23% - 6 point gain

EL – 2014 – 47% and 2015 – 38% - 9 point loss

GEORGIA MILESTONES ASSESSMENT SYSTEM – END OF COURSE (GMAS-EOC)

Results for the GMAS are not yet available, and are anticipated to be released in October of 2015.

GEORGIA HIGH SCHOOL WRITING TEST (GHSWT)

The GHSWT is administered for the first time in the fall of the eleventh grade school year and allows the typical student multiple opportunities to pass before the end of the twelfth grade year. The GHSWT requires students to write a composition of no more than two pages on an assigned persuasive topic. Each essay is independently rated on the composition on four domains (ideas, organization, style, and conventions) of effective writing.

The scale score range for the Georgia High School Writing Test is 100 to 350. A scale score of 200 or higher is required to meet the GHSWT standard in order for a student to meet graduation.

• The scale score range is 100-199 for “Does Not Meet the Standard” (DNM).

• The scale score range is 200-249 for “Meets the Standard” (M).

• The scale score range is 250-350 for “Exceeds the Standard” (EXC).

Objective: To increase the percentage of students meeting or exceeding the standard in writing as measured by the Georgia Writing Assessment in grade 11.

Baseline: SY 2012-2013: 91 percent for GHSWT

Target: By 2015-2016, the percentage of students meeting or exceeding standard on the GHSWT will be 93 percent.

Fall 2014 is the last main administration of the GHSWT as writing will be assessed through the Georgia Milestones End of Course in Ninth Grade Comp/Lit and American Literature courses beginning in December, 2014.

Fall 2013 – 92% met or exceeded standards in the GHSWT

Fall 2014 – 96% met or exceeded standards in the GHSWT

As the state transitions from the Writing assessments in grades 5, 8 and 11, the following action plans have been put in place to improve students’ proficiency in writing.

Professional Learning Coaches, in partnership with the Content Specialists will develop and implement a comprehensive Interdisciplinary Literacy/Writing Plan (ILWP) for grades 2 through 12 to include digital writing portfolios based on the established Georgia Standards of Excellence/ Georgia Performance Standards (GSE/GPS) rubrics in preparation for the Georgia Milestones Assessments. Professional Learning Coaches will work with schools to train school leaders and teachers on literacy/writing strategies and portfolio assessments as outlined in the ILWP. Executive Directors of School Governance will evaluate the effectiveness of the ILWP using Wilson Fundations, SRA Reading Mastery, SRI, and portfolio assessments as measure by formative and summative assessment data. Executive Directors of School Governance will monitor the formative data, meet

with the school level data teams to analyze results, and recommend instructional delivery adjustments to ensure program effectiveness. The Executive Directors and principals will also monitor the implementation of the recommended adjustments to improve student performance/growth.
COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS PERFORMANCE INDEX (CCRPI)

As a key component of Georgia’s waiver from No Child Left Behind, the College and Career Ready Performance Index is part of a revised accountability system that replaces the Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) designations of the past. The CCRPI results represent an index score on a 100 point scale that is designed to provide an indicator of college and career readiness based on a comprehensive set of student achievement and growth measures.

Objective: To increase the district and schools’ college and career readiness score as measured and reported by the Georgia Department of Education (GADOE).

Target: By end of SY 2016-17

Grades K-5 –70.3%

Grades 6-8 –70%

Grades 9-12 –73%

Highlights of the 2013-2014 Savannah Chatham County Public School System’s CCRPI results include:



  • The district’s overall 2014 CCRPI score was 67.2 which exceeded that of the comparison group of demographically similar districts.

  • Among the three grade-level bands, SCCPSS achieved a score of 68.7 in grades K-5, 65.9 in grades 6-8, and 65.0 in grades 9-12. The district outperformed its comparison group in grades K-5 and 9-12.

  • Both the state and district overall score decreased by about 4 points compared to last year. However, the district’s K-5 and 6-8 scores are higher in 2014 compared to 2012, the first year in which CCRPI was calculated. By comparison, state scores fell below their 2012 levels within all grade level bands. For both the state and district, decreases in Achievement Gap scores had the greatest impact on the decline in overall scores.

  • Within the CCRPI components, SCCPSS met or exceeded the state in grades K-5 and 6-8 Achievement Gap, grades 9-12 Subgroup Performance, and in all grade level bands Exceeding the Bar.

  • Overall scores for SCCPSS non-charter schools range from 41.3 to 99.3, with J.G. Smith Elementary earning the district’s highest overall score. Bloomingdale, Heard, Howard, Marshpoint, Pooler, Pulaski, Southwest, West Chatham, Ellis, Garrison, Georgetown, Godley Station, Hesse, Isle of Hope, Coastal Middle, STEM Academy, Savannah Arts, and Woodville-Tompkins each exceeded the 2017 DAS performance target.

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  • Twenty SCCPSS schools improved their CCRPI score compared to last year. Gadsden, Spencer, and Hesse each achieved double-digit gains in grades K-5, while DeRenne and New Hampstead achieved the greatest improvement in grades 6-8 and 9-12.

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Strategies



Principals (K-12) will provide ongoing professional development to teachers on how to effectively use the State Longitudinal Data System (SLDS). This professional development will focus on using data to develop instructional strategies to enhance subject/course content and promote rigorous standards in every classroom. It is through this practice that both the Progress and Academic Achievement components of the CCRPI will increase. Principals (K-12) will continue to monitor the implementation of the Georgia Standards of Excellence and research based instructional strategies through classroom observations, focus walks, review of TKES unit lesson plans, and use of common assessments. Diagnostic data will be used in developing individualized Professional Development Plans to support teacher growth and improvement.

Principals (K-12) will implement the CompassLearning Odyssey Program with fidelity to provide individualized support as students work toward mastery of critical mathematical concepts. Professional Learning Coaches, in partnership with the Content Specialists, will continue to implement the district’s Interdisciplinary Literacy/Writing Plan (ILWP) for grades 2 through 12, including digital writing portfolios based on the established Georgia Standards ofExcellence rubrics in preparation for the Georgia Milestones Assessments. Executive Directors of School Governance will evaluate (July 2015) the effectiveness of the ILWP using SRI data, and portfolio assessments as measured by formative and summative assessment data.

Executive Directors of School Governance in collaboration with principals will develop rubrics for assessing grade level promotion readiness of students struggling in the areas of reading and math using multiple sources of data which allow for a more thorough assessment of the academic needs of every student. Executive Directors of School Governance will monitor the formative data, meet with the school level data teams to analyze results, and recommend instructional delivery adjustments to ensure program effectiveness. The Executive Directors and principals will also monitor the implementation of the recommended adjustments to improve student performance/growth.
Objective D – Graduation Rate

Objective: To increase the district graduation rate utilizing the cohort-based formula as reported by the Georgia Department of Education (GADOE)

Baseline:

SY2010-2011 – 54.4% (4 year cohort)

SY 2011-2012 – 56.9% (5-year extended)

Graduation data for the 2012-2013 school year indicated

Target:

SY2014-2015 -72% ( 4 year cohort and 5 year extended)


In April 2012 GADOE began publishing a graduation rate based on the cohort calculation method that the United States Department of Education now requires all states to use.

The cohort formula tracks individual students from the date of 9th grade entry in order to determine whether they earn a regular education diploma within 4 years.

Number of students who entered 9th grade in SY 2010-2011 & earned a regular diploma in SY 2013-2014

---------------------Divided by--------------------

Total number of students who entered 9th grade in SY 2010-2011*

GADOE also publishes a Five-Year Extended Cohort Graduation Rate to determine whether students earn a regular diploma within 5 years.

Cohort graduation data for the 2012-2013 school year indicated a 69.8% graduation rate and for the 2013-2014 SY a 68.5% graduation rate.

Additionally, for the 2012-2013 SY the 5-year extended graduation rate for SCCPSS students was at 70.6%



* Includes transfers in; excludes transfers out
Strategies

  • The Executive Directors of School Governance have developed a K-12 Four Year Strategic Plan to support increasing the Cohort Graduation Rate. Key components of the plan include training/professional development for teachers and school administrators, individualized educational planning for students, etc.

  • The Executive Director of Secondary School Governance will continue to monitor the System-Wide Academic Records Management (SWARM) Process to ensure implementation with fidelity. Doing so will help us ensure accuracy of the 2015 Cohort Graduation Rate.

  • Principals will conduct Leave No Graduate Behind Parent Meetings twice per school year (fall and spring), to inform parents of their student’s progress toward meeting the Georgia graduation requirements.

  • Principals and school counselors will continue to identify students who require additional support through recovery programs such as the Twilight High School Program, evening school, and Saturday school in order to increase the Cohort Graduation Rate.



As a result of the district’s disaggregated data analysis and consequent identification of subgroup needs, the following targeted goals were identified as outlined in the LEA Implementation Plan:


  • The Georgia Milestone Assessment System (GMAS) will be used to increase the percentage of students meeting or exceeding standard in the core content areas as measured by the GMAS examination administered in Grades 3- 12.

  • Graduation rate: to increase the district graduation rate as measured by the 4 Year and 5 Year Extended Cohort Graduation Rates.

  • Georgia Milestone Assessment System will be used to increase the pass rate on all High School End of Course (EOC) as measured by the Georgia Department of Education.

  • Advanced Placement Tests: to increase the percentage of students participating in the Advanced Placement program and the percentage of students achieving a score of 3 or higher on the Advanced Placement Exams as determined by the College Board.

  • International Baccalaureate (IB) Diplomas: to increase the percentage of students being awarded the International Baccalaureate Diploma.

  • Scholastic Aptitude Reasoning Test (SAT): to increase the District average on the Verbal and Mathematics portions of the SAT Reasoning Test, a nationally norm-referenced college entrance examination.

  • American College Testing (ACT): to increase the district average composite score on the American College Testing (ACT), a nationally norm-referenced, college entrance examination.

  • Reading on Grade Level: to increase the percentage of students who are reading on grade level by the end of grade 2 as measured by the Scholastic Reading Inventory. In addition, the gateway promotion standards for grades 2, 4, and 7 are ongoing.

ACTION ITEMS

  • The Senior Director of Curriculum and Instruction, Program Manager of Literacy, and Professional Learning Literacy coaches developed and implemented a comprehensive Interdisciplinary Literacy/Writing Plan (ILWP) for grades 2 through 12 to include digital writing portfolios based on the established Georgia Standards of Excellence/Georgia Performance Standards (GSE/GPS) rubrics in preparation for the Georgia Milestones Assessments.

  • Professional Learning Literacy Coaches will work with schools to train school leaders and teachers on literacy/writing strategies and portfolio assessments as outlined in the ILWP.

  • Executive Directors of School Governance (elementary and secondary) will evaluate the effectiveness of the ILWP using Wilson Fundations, SRA Reading Mastery, SRI, and portfolio assessments.

  • The Senior Director of Curriculum and Instruction, Program Manager of Mathematics, and Professional Learning Math coaches developed and implemented a comprehensive interdisciplinary Math Plan (IMP) for grades K through 12 using several research-based strategies, including but not limited to those below, in preparation for the Georgia Milestones Assessments.

  • Strategies

  1. Visual and graphic descriptions of problems

  2. Systematic and explicit instruction

  3. Student think-alouds

  4. Peer-assisted learning activities

  5. Common formative assessments (NWEA MAP and mCLASS)

  6. Individualized and instruction for every student using a blended learning approach (Compass Learning)

  • Executive Directors of School Governance (elementary and secondary) will monitor the formative data, meet with the school level data teams to analyze results, and recommend instructional delivery adjustments to ensure program effectiveness. The Executive Directors and principals will also monitor the implementation of the recommended adjustments closely.

Title IIA

The Annual Needs Assessment process in place in SCCPSS allows principals and district level leaders to meet with stakeholders and review data to determine how equity needs will be addressed in schools and in the district as a whole. Each year, the principal selects stakeholders, also known as the School Needs Assessment Team, to include the principal, regular education teacher, special education teacher, paraprofessional, business partner(s), and a parent. A meeting is held to discuss all components of the Annual Needs Assessment document. Items discussed in the meeting include:

• Sub-group analysis based on assessment results

• Subject areas that must be targeted for improvement

• Professional Learning support that would increase student achievement
A District Plan/Comprehensive LEA Instructional Plan (CLIP) meeting is held and the annual needs assessment results are shared with the District Plan/CLIP Committee. Prioritized professional learning needs are added to the Comprehensive LEA Instructional Plan/District Plan for the upcoming school year based on the comprehensive results of all Annual Needs Assessments.

The needs assessment process enables principals, school personnel, parents, business partners, and district administrators to evaluate pertinent data and create a list of needs to support academic growth. The plan addresses the Annual Needs Assessment, Equity of Stakeholder Involvement, Highly Qualified Teacher Equity, Teacher Experience Equity, Class Size Equity, Meeting Diverse Needs of Students, Retention of Highly Qualified Teachers, and Recruitment and Placement of Highly Qualified Effective Teachers.

The Equity Plan is revised annually by the Core Equity Team.
Georgia Milestones Assessment System (GMAS), SRI (Scholastic Reading Inventory), Lexiles, MAP (Measures of Academic Progress), DIBELS (Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills), mCLASS Math, Georgia Online Formative Assessment Resource (GOFAR), Student Learning Objectives (SLOs) and Climate Surveys will be used for data collection.

Needs Assessment forms and yearly Professional Learning Surveys are additional data sources that will impact our Equity Plan.

Needs Assessment Forms submitted by all principals will be reviewed and tallied by the Core Equity Data Team. The following questions will be answered by all building administrators:

1) Do you have a disproportionate number of teachers who are not highly-qualified?

2) Do you have an inequitable number of teachers with 0-3 year experience?

3) Do you have paraprofessionals in the Title I Program who are not HiQ?

4) Do you need assistance with recruiting and placement of HiQ teachers to ensure that all students have access to experienced teachers?

*Annual Professional Learning Survey will be administered to receive feedback to plan ongoing professional development and support services provided to teachers and paraprofessional in our school district.



Brief summary of the findings:
At the end of the 2014-2015 school year, the HiQ System Report indicates: 99.44% of our teachers are HiQ and 0.56% of our teachers were non-HiQ.

For the same time period, the HiQ System Report indicates: 99.8% of our paraprofessionals are HiQ and 0.2% of our paraprofessionals were non-HiQ.




  • The Professional Learning Team will work diligently to offer courses and to provide one-on-one assistance to target increasing the ability of teachers to meet the diverse needs of students. Courses will continue to be offered through the Professional Learning Department to address needs of diverse learners. One major addition is the offering of the ESOL Endorsement. Another initiative is the Cultural Diversity Training for Administrators. Diversity training for administrators will be provided to principals and assistant principals through Educational Impact. Several modules will be offered to administrators to assist them with addressing diversity in their classrooms. The following are a few of the modules that will be available: Diversity Recommendations in Breaking the Ranks, Embracing Student Diversity, Diversity in the Real World, and Overcoming Cultural Diversity.

  • Class Size is monitored at school and district level. The director of the Budget Department and his team provide daily requests at the beginning of each school year for the number of students at each grade level to ensure the number does not exceed mandated class size. If the number of students exceeds the limit, a teacher is added to that grade level. If the number of students is below the mandated number, a teacher is removed from that grade level.




  • Vertical team meetings between Middle School and High School teachers, coaches, and Program Managers take place to discuss quality instruction so that all students are prepared and receive equitable opportunities to take higher level courses. Principals and site-assigned coaches observe classrooms on a frequent rotation to ensure class sizes are adequate as it pertains to instructional delivery. Classroom Management support/training is also provided to ensure teachers have the skills to present instructional delivery at high levels to all students. . During the 2015-2016 school year a Professional Learning Coach targeting Classroom Management will create modules to assist teachers in need of assistance in the classroom.




  • Data available in the Georgia Professional Standards Commission (GaPSC) Mid-Year School Personnel Analysis (MYSPA )Report –2015 System Level Report/Teacher Attrition—Experience Levels indicate the following:

Experience Levels (Clear Renewable Teachers 2497)

Low 154 6.17%

Mid 1782 71.37%

High 561 22.47%

Experience Levels (Special Education Teachers 544)

Low 55 10.11%

Mid 397 72.98%

High 92 16.91%
Referencing available equity data reports (2014-2015—the most recent data available on the PSC.org database), the annual teacher retention rate is 87.8%. The current percentage represents a steady sustained retention rate. Teacher retention will continue to be a focus. The recruitment needs continue for hard to staff areas such as math, special education, and foreign language.
List of the Prioritized Needs for Title II, Part A
Mathematics, Reading, English/Language Arts, Social Studies, and Science are areas that need improvement according to the results of the Needs Assessment submitted by Site Administrators and Content Area Program Managers. Recruitment and Retention of Highly Qualified Teachers and Principals will be an on-going prioritized need in our district.

Professional learning for 2015-2016 in the following areas will improve teaching and learning: Differentiated instruction, interpreting and using data, classroom management, effective teaching strategies, and pyramid of interventions.

Special Education and Economically Disadvantaged continue to be the subgroups which do not meet expectations and continues to contribute to district schools designated as Focus schools.

Professional Learning Math and Literacy Coaches have been assigned as a team to each level (elementary, middle and high) to provide ongoing professional learning and support services. Professional Learning Science and Social Studies Coaches have been assigned to middle and high school grade levels. Documentation has and will continue to be maintained by each coach to measure effectiveness of services provided.

The First District RESA Georgia Teacher Academy for Preparation and Pedagogy® (GaTAPP) Program and Oconee RESA, will provide teachers with the necessary training to obtain Clear Renewable Certification. Classes/activities are in place to ensure teacher quality is maintained and teachers remain in the SCCPSS as solid support is given on a frequent basis.

The Professional Learning Team expanded to include not only the Professional Learning Coaches but Professional Learning Literacy Coaches, Professional Learning Math Coaches, Professional Learning Science Coaches, and Professional Learning Social Studies Coaches. The Professional Learning Team provided observations/feedback, demonstration lessons, walk-through protocols, and content specific training.


The focus of the 2015-2016 school year will be to continue to concentrate on the recruitment and placement of highly-qualified, highly effective teachers. Many factors are considered as teachers are placed at sites in the beginning of the school year. The Core Equity Team and the Teacher Quality Specialist will meet and discuss the current practices used in the placement of teachers to ensure all schools have an equal opportunity to receive highly effective teachers.
Strategies/Interventions

• Review equity data from each school.

• Identify schools with a disproportionate amount of new teachers and a low student achievement rate.

• Continued support to meet the individual needs of new teachers through SCCPSS Induction Program which provides a site-based Induction Coordinator and mentors for each teacher.

• New Teacher Orientation provides a classroom management and diversity segment to educate all new employees of the diversity issues in the district.



In addition the focus of the 2015-2016 school year will be to concentrate on Class Size Equity.

With the increase in class size at many schools in our district it has become increasingly difficult for students to receive the individualized supported needed for them to reach high academic achievement.

We will use the following strategies to obtain Class Size Equity:

• We will review the three Georgia Flexibility Options (IE2/Charter System/Traditional System) and serve as facilitators at stakeholder meetings to gauge the direction of the district as it pertains to the option that will be selected by our school district. This will have an impact on Class Size Equity across the school district.

• We will share innovative models that are successful in other districts that have larger class sizes.

• We will require Professional Learning Coaches assigned to various schools to make the Core Equity Team Leader aware of large class sizes with low student achievement and classroom management needs. Training will be offered on site to address issues that prohibit high quality instructional delivery.








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