Phase One Table of Contents 2 Common Core State Standards 3 Teacher Content Knowledge 4-8 Phase Two



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Name: _______________________________________ Date: ___________________________

Directions: Sort the books in the basket into two piles of biographies and expository non-fiction texts. Write the book titles under the appropriate heading below.

Biographies

Expository Non-Fiction








Day 2 / Lesson 2

Date of Lesson: February 14, 2014

NCTE Standard

Common Core Standard

Objective

Lesson Description

Assessment

Materials

1. Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.

3.RI.1

Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as a basis for the answers.




TSW connect biographies to fictional stories by identifying the subject and their hardships, struggles, and accomplishments.

TTW ask the students to come to the carpet.

TTW say, “Yesterday you all did a great job of understanding the differences between expository non-fiction books and biographies.”



TTW ask the students to review what they learned the previous day by talking with their neighbor about the differences between the two types of text.

Then, TTW ask the students to raise their hands if they would like to share their answer with the class. TTW call on approximately two students. (expository text has true facts about “things” and biographies are true stories about real people)



TTW hold up The Story of Ruby Bridges and remind the class that they classified the book as a biography because it was a true story about a real person.

TTW ask the students to raise their hands if they can tell the class who the main character is in the story. TTW call on approximately one student. (Ruby Bridges)

TTW tell the students that you can also call the main character the “subject” of the story.

TTW ask the students to think quietly for ten seconds about their favorite main character or subject from a fictional book or movie.

Then, TTW ask the students to share their favorite character with their neighbor. TTW ask the students to think to themselves for thirty seconds about what makes their favorite character interesting or exciting.

TTW ask the students to share those characteristics with their neighbor. TTW ask the students to raise their hands if they would like to share their favorite character and the things that make that character interesting or exciting.

TTW call on approximately three students to share with the class.



Next, TTW ask the students to think quietly to themselves for thirty seconds about the struggles, problems, and/ or achievements their favorite character has.

TTW ask the students to share the struggles, problems, and/or achievements with their neighbor.

TTW ask the students to raise their hands if they would like to share with the class. TTW call on approximately three students to share with the class.

TTW say, “Just like your favorite characters from fictional books and movies are interesting because of their struggles, problems, and/or achievements, the subjects of biographies also have to overcome “real” struggles and “real” problems, as well as have “real” accomplishments.”

TTW ask the students to return to their desks.



TTW say, “Yesterday we listened to the true story about a little girl named Ruby Bridges. She had to face tough moments when she was only six years old. Raise your hands if you can tell the class one of the “real” problems, struggles, or accomplishments Ruby had.”

TTW call on approximately four students.



Then, TTW tell the students that each student will be working with a partner at their table. TSW be given a paper with a passage from The Story of Ruby Bridges. TSW take turns with their partners reading the passage out loud to each other and pretending to be Ruby Bridges. After one partner is finished reading, the other partner will ask “Ruby Bridges” two questions that are typed on the passage. “What did you want?” and “Why was it hard to get?” Then the partners will switch roles.

After the partners have finished, TTW give each student a short biography to read. TSW read the biography and fill in the graphic organizer on the bottom of the page. TSW use the passage to identify the subject of the biography, and the subject’s hardships, struggles, and accomplishments. TSW have approximately fifteen minutes to complete the graphic organizer.



After fifteen minutes, TTW review the graphic organizer with the class using the document camera and then collect it.

Lastly, TTW tell the students that they did a great job finding the subject of the biography and recognizing the subject’s hardships, struggles, and accomplishments. She will ask the students if they have any questions. Then, TTW tell the students to remember that when they are reading biographies they should look for these aspects of the subject.




Biography Passage and Graphic Organizer (Appendix A)

Timer

The Story of Ruby Bridges

Ruby Bridges Passage (21)

Biography Passage with Graphic Organizer (21) (Appendix A)


Name: ___________________________________________ Date: ______________________________

Biography

Jackie Robinson was born on January 31, 1919, in Cairo, Georgia but grew up in California. From the time he was a child, he was a great athlete and played baseball, football, basketball, tennis and ran track. Jackie, however, loved baseball.

Jackie grew up in a time where discrimination was accepted. African-American people like Jackie did not have the same rights at White people. They were not accepted in Major League Baseball, so Jackie’s baseball career started with the Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro Leagues – a baseball league for African-American players.

In 1946, however, Brooklyn Dodgers owner Branch Rickey decided to sign Jackie Robinson to a Major League contract. Jackie would become the first African-American athlete in 57 years to play in Major League Baseball, thus breaking the “color barrier.” Many fans and fellow baseball players refused to accept Jackie as an equal. He continued to experience discrimination and racism. Nevertheless, Jackie excelled on the field, and quickly became one of Major League Baseball’s best players. In 1949, he was named Major League Baseball’s most valuable player (MVP). In 1955, he led the Brooklyn Dodgers to their only World Series Championship.

In 1956, Jackie Robinson retired from Major League Baseball. He was voted a member of the Major League Baseball Hall-of-Fame in 1962 and died in 1972. Today, Major League Baseball has permanently retired Jackie’s number 24 to honor his memory and courage. This means no player on any team will ever be able to wear 24 again.

(http://mrnussbaum.com/jackie-robinson-young/)



Day 3 / Lesson 3

Date of Lesson: February 18, 2014

NCTE Standard

Common Core Standard

Objective

Lesson Description

Assessment

Materials

3. Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).

3.RI.7

Use information gained from illustrations and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text.




TSW develop a theory about the specific traits of a subject by paying attention to the decisions he or she makes.

TTW ask the students to come to the carpet.

TTW say, “Yesterday you all did a great job identifying the hardships, struggles, and accomplishments of the subjects in the biographies you read. Today we are going to use that skill to learn more about the subjects of biographies.”



TTW ask the students to think to themselves for ten seconds about how they get to know someone (a friend, a classmate, or a neighbor).

TTW ask the students to talk to their neighbor for thirty seconds about how they get to know a new person, and then TTW ask the students to raise their hands if they would like to share with the class. (TS may answer that they get to know a new person by talking to them, asking them questions, or watching them.)

TTW reinforce that you can learn a lot about a person by listening to what they say and by watching how they act in different situations.

TTW start a PowerPoint presentation that will show pictures of people reacting to various situations.

TTW ask the students to think of adjectives that they could use to describe the people in the pictures based on their actions.

TTW ask the students to raise their hands if they would like to share their answer with the class.

TTW call on approximately three students per picture.

After the presentation, TTW hold up The Story of Ruby Bridges and remind the class that they classified the book as a biography because it was a real story about a real person.

TTW reread the passage from the book that the students read the previous day with their partners. TTW ask the students what Ruby’s reaction was when the angry grown-ups yelled at her and said they wanted to hurt her. (she stayed calm, she kept walking into the school, she prayed for the people)

Then, TTW ask the students, “What do Ruby’s actions tell us about her and what adjectives could you use to describe her?” (determined, courageous, brave, kind, mature)

TTW write the adjectives that the students say on a chart at the front of the room that is titled “Powerful Adjectives to Describe a Subject in a Biography.”

TTW ask the students to return to their desks.

TTW pass out another passage from The Story of Ruby Bridges.

TSW read the passage individually and then work with their neighbor to think about the subject’s actions, ask themselves what those actions tell us about the subject, decide on at least two new powerful adjectives to describe the subject, and write those adjectives on their paper. TSW have five minutes to complete this activity.

After the students are finished, TTW call on a student from each set of partners to share one of the powerful adjectives that they wrote down. TTW write the new adjectives on the chart.

Next, TTW give each student a short biography to read.

TSW read the biography, and fill in the graphic organizer on the bottom of the page. The graphic organizer will ask the students to list an action of the subject and an adjective that describes the subject doing that action. TSW have approximately ten minutes to complete this assessment.

TTW review the graphic organizer with the class using the document camera and then collect the assessment.

Lastly, TTW tell the students that they did a great job finding powerful adjectives that describe the subjects in biographies. TTW remind the students that when they read biographies, the decisions and actions of the subject can tell us about the kind of person that subject is on the inside. She will ask the students if they have any questions.




Biography Passage and Graphic Organizer (Appendix A)

Timer

PowerPoint Presentation



The Story of Ruby Bridges

Adjective Chart

Marker

Ruby Bridges Passage(21)



Biography Passage with Graphic Organizer (21) (Appendix A)

Document Camera




Name: _______________________________________ Date: _________________________

http://mrnussbaum.com/women/parks.jpg

Rosa Louise McCauley was born February 4, 1913 in Tuskegee, Alabama. Her father was a carpenter, and her mother was a teacher. She had a younger brother named Sylvester. When she was two, her parents separated. Her family moved to her grandparents’ farm in Pine Level, Alabama. Both her grandparents were former slaves. Pine Level supported the idea of separate but equal. White children rode a bus to their newly built school while African-American children had to walk to a one-room schoolhouse that didn’t have enough desks or supplies. Rosa said, “Back then, we didn’t have any civil rights. It was just a matter of survival, of existing from one day to the next. I remember going to sleep as a girl hearing the Klan ride at night and hearing a lynching and being afraid the house would burn down.”

She quit high school when she was a junior to help take care of her grandmother. Afterwards, she worked as a seamstress in a shirt factory in Montgomery. In 1932, Rosa married Raymond Parks. He was a barber who was actively involved in the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Rosa Parks was the first woman to join the Montgomery chapter of the NAACP.

On December 1, 1955, a bus driver asked her to give her seat on a bus to a white male passenger. She refused. She was arrested and fined $10 plus court costs ($4) for violating a city ordinance that said the bus driver could assign seats. 


(http://mrnussbaum.com/rosa-parks)

Subject’s Action

Powerful Adjective to Describe Action

1.




2.




Day 4 / Lesson 4

Date of Lesson: February 19, 2014

NCTE Standard

Common Core Standard

Objective

Lesson Description

Assessment

Materials

1. Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.

3.RI.2

Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.




TSW determine the main idea of a biography and summarize the events of the text.

TTW say, “This week we have been reading The Story of Ruby Bridges. We have discovered the subject of the biography, her hardships, struggles, and accomplishments, and we have learned about who the subject was on the inside based on her actions in the story.”

TTW ask the students to raise their hands if they can tell the class about the subject, her hardships, struggles, and accomplishments, and adjectives that describe the subject based on her actions.



TTW begin a Smart Board presentation. Each slide will show three pictures that are related.

TTW ask the students to look at the three pictures and think for ten seconds quietly to themselves about what the three pictures have in common or what the main theme of the pictures is.

Next, TTW ask the students to turn to their neighbor and share what they think the main theme of the pictures is for thirty seconds.

Lastly, TTW ask the students to raise their hands if they can share the main theme of the pictures with the class.



After a student names a main theme, TTW ask that student what details from the pictures led him or her to decide on the main theme. TTW write the students’ responses on the presentation.

TTW tell the students that they did a good job finding the main themes of the sets of pictures. She will tell the students that they can use those same skills to find the main idea of a text.



TTW explain that finding the most important details in a text can help a reader determine its main idea.

TTW ask the students to think about The Story of Ruby Bridges. TTW ask the students to raise their hands if they can tell the class one of the most important details of the story.

TTW write the details the students name on the presentation.

Then, TTW ask the students to sum up the main idea of the story in just a few words or a short sentence based on the important details the class listed.

TTW call on the students who raise their hands and write their responses on the board.

TTW ask the class to discuss all of the possible main ideas and decide on which one best sums up the story.

Next, TTW go to the next part of the Smart Board presentation. Each slide will have a short biography passage.

TTW ask the students to read along with her as she reads the passage aloud.

TTW ask the students to think quietly for thirty seconds about what the most important details are from the passage.

After thirty seconds, TTW ask the students to discuss their thoughts with their neighbor at their table.

Then, TTW ask the students to raise their hands if they want to share with the class one of the main details from the passage. TSW come to the board and use the highlighter pen to highlight the main details.

After the students have highlighted approximately three details, TTW ask the students to quietly think about what the main idea of the passage is.

TTW ask the students to raise their hands if they would like to share with the class. TTW call on approximately three students and will write the main idea of the biography that the students say on the presentation.



Next, TTW give each student a short biography to read and activity to complete independently.

TSW read the biography, highlight at least three main events, and then write the main idea at the bottom of the page on the line provided. TSW have ten minutes to complete the assignment.

After ten minutes, TTW review the assignment with the students and collect it.

Lastly, TTW tell the students that they did a wonderful job identifying the main events and details in the biography passages and determining the main idea of the text. TTW remind the students that when they read biographies or any genre of writing, they should look for the main events and key details that tell the reader the main idea of the story. She will ask the students if they have any questions about biographies or the skills they practiced during this lesson.




Finding the Main Idea Activity Sheet (Appendix A)

Timer

Smart Notebook 11 Presentation



The Story of Ruby Bridges

Finding the Main Idea Activity Sheet (21) (Appendix A)


Name: ____________________________________________ Date: _____________________________

Directions: Read the biography below. Highlight at least three main events in the subject’s life story. Then write the main idea of the story in a short sentence in the space provided.

http://mrnussbaum.com/images/aaron.jpg

Early Life

Hank Aaron was born February 5, 1934 in Mobile, Alabama. He was the third of eight children. When his father took him to hear a speech given by Jackie Robinson, Hank committed himself to playing baseball. Aaron showed an early propensity for sports and played both baseball and football at Central High School in Mobile and Josephine Allen Institute, a private school. Aaron started played semi-pro baseball at age 15 and earned $10 per day playing for the Mobile Black Bears, an all Black baseball team. In 1951, Aaron was signed by the Indianapolis Clowns of the Negro Baseball League. In 1952, he helped his team to the Negro League World Series.



Called up to the Majors

Aaron became the last Negro League player to make the jump to the Major Leagues when he was signed by the Boston Braves in 1952. By the time that Aaron reached the majors, the Boston Braves had become the Milwaukee Braves. Aaron played brilliantly in the minor leagues and even became MVP of the South-Atlantic League despite being the constant target of prejudice. In 1954, the Boston Braves called him up to the Major Leagues when left-fielder Bobby Thompson broke his ankle. Despite going 0-5 in his major league debut (no hits in five at-bats), Aaron was in the majors to stay. During his first year, he batted .280 (this means he would average 28 hits per 100 at-bats) with 13 home runs. These totals were among the lowest of his amazing career. In 1955, Aaron made his first of 24 All-Star games and batted .314 with 27 home runs. Hank would hit 20 or more home runs for 20 consecutive years. The next year, in Aaron’s third year in the majors, he won the batting title with a .328 average. He was also named the Sporting News National League Player of the Year. 1957 would become one of the best years of his career. After being switched to cleanup (fourth in the batting order), Aaron responded with 44 home runs and 132 RBI’s (Runs Batted In – This means that as a result of something he did with the bat, like get a hit, sacrifice fly, ground out, or walk, a player(s) on his team scored). That year, he led the Milwaukee Braves to their only World Series title. In the years following the World Series, the Milwaukee Braves never again reached the playoffs. Nevertheless, Aaron continued to establish himself as one of the game’s great hitters and began amassing impressive batting statistics. In 1962, the Milwaukee Braves moved to Atlanta and became the Atlanta Braves.



Home Run Record

Despite the move to Atlanta, the Braves never made another World Series during Aaron’s career. Many fans in Atlanta, however, were satisfied by watching Hank’s on-field heroics. In 1970, Hank became the first player in history to get 3,000 hits and 500 home runs in a career. By the end of 1973, he had accumulated 713 home runs. He was only two away from eclipsing the most hallowed record in American sports – Babe Ruth’s career home run record. On April 4, 1974, at the age of 40, Aaron hit a pitch from Los Angeles Dodger pitcher Al Downing over the left field fence in Atlanta’s Fulton County Stadium. He had broken Babe Ruth’s record. To this day, one of the most memorable highlights in sports history is the image of Aaron rounding second base with two fans running after him trying to congratulate him. After the 1974 season, Hank played two more years with the Milwaukee Brewers. He ended his career with 755 home runs (the record has now been eclipsed by Barry Bonds). He remains the all-time leader in RBI’s with 2,297. On August 1, 1982, Hank Aaron was inducted into the Major League Baseball Hall-of-Fame. Both the Braves and Brewers retired (which means no one can wear it again) his uniform number “44″. Today, Turner Field (Atlanta’s new stadium) is located at 755 Hank Aaron Drive SE.



Main Idea

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________________

Day 5 / Lesson 5

Date of Lesson: February 20, 2014

NCTE Standard

Common Core Standard

Objective

Lesson Description

Assessment

Materials

2. Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience.

3.RI.3

Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas of concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.

3.RI.7

Use information gained from illustrations and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text.




TSW recognize how the subject’s time period differs from their own by paying attention to details of place, time, and people’s behavior.

TTW ask the students to come to the carpet.

TTW say, “The biographies we have been reading this week have been stories about the lives of famous African Americans who lived a long time ago, when the world was a different place. Think about The Story of Ruby Bridges, what details in the story let us know that Ruby did not grow up in our present time?”

TTW call on approximately four students. (The date written in the story, the segregation of African Americans, the white people being mean and violent towards Ruby, or the clothes the people were wearing in the illustrations)

TTW say, “Those are great details that tell the reader that Ruby did not grow up in our present time. When we read biographies it is important for us to pay attention to details in the story that help us understand the time period in which the subject of the biography lived. Why would it be important for us to know the time period that a subject of a biography lived in?”

TTW call on approximately two students. (Tells us how life might have been different during that time period for the subject, gives us more insight into the subject’s life)



Then, TTW reread the portion of the book that describes the angry adults yelling at Ruby, the police officers that would not protect her, and the white families not sending their children to school because Ruby was there (pgs. 9-14).

TTW ask the students to think silently to themselves for thirty seconds about the people’s behaviors and how that behavior helps you understand that the time period that Ruby grew up during is different than now.



After thirty seconds, TTW ask the students to turn to a neighbor and discuss their thoughts. TTW ask the students to raise their hands if they would like to share their thoughts with the class. TTW call on approximately four students and listen to their observations.

TTW ask the students to go back to their desks.

TTW tell the students that they can find details in every biography they read that will tell them what time period the subject lived during. TTW remind the students that they should pay attention to people’s behaviors, events taking place, and any illustrations or photographs in biographies to help them recognize that the subject’s time period may be different from their own.

TTW tell the students that they are going to practice identifying time periods during the next activity.

TSW work with their table groups and read three short biographies.

Then, TSW write the names of the subjects in order from the subject who lived in the least recent time period to the subject who lived in the most recent time period on their activity sheet.

TSW also include three details from the biography that helped them determine the time period that the subject lived during.

TSW have approximately fifteen minutes to complete the assignment.



TTW review the activity sheet with the class using the document camera and then collect the activity sheets.

Lastly, TTW tell the students that they did a wonderful job determining the time periods that the subjects of the biographies lived during and recognizing that those time periods are different from their own. TTW remind the students that when they read biographies they should pay attention to the people’s behavior, the places, events, and the time in order to recognize how the subject’s time period might be different from our current time period. TTW ask the students if they have any questions about biographies or the skills they practiced during this lesson.




Read to Discover the Subject’s Time Period Activity Sheet (Appendix A)

Timer

The Story of Ruby Bridges

Read to Discover the Subject’s Time Period Activity Sheet (21) (Appendix A)

Biography Passages (21)

Document Camera


Name: _____________________________________________ Date: ____________________________

Read to Discover the Subject’s Time Period

Directions: Write the names of the subjects of the three biographies in order from the subject who lived in the least recent time period to the subject who lived in the most recent time period. Give three supporting details from the biography that helped you determine the order.



1st : ___________________________________________________________

Supporting Detail # 1


Supporting Detail # 2


Supporting Detail # 3


2nd : __________________________________________________________

Supporting Detail # 1


Supporting Detail # 2


Supporting Detail # 3


3rd: ___________________________________________________________

Supporting Detail # 1


Supporting Detail # 2


Supporting Detail # 3


twentieth century writer and poet langston hughes

Langston Hughes was one of the most important writers and thinkers of the Harlem Renaissance, which was the African American artistic movement in the 1920s that celebrated black life and culture. Hughes's creative genius was influenced by his life in New York City's Harlem, a primarily African American neighborhood. His literary works helped shape American literature and politics. Hughes, like others active in the Harlem Renaissance, had a strong sense of racial pride. Through his poetry, novels, plays, essays, and children's books, he promoted equality, condemned racism and injustice, and celebrated African American culture, humor, and spirituality. 

harriet tubman

Harriet Tubman was a runaway slave from Maryland who became known as the "Moses of her people." Over the course of 10 years, and at great personal risk, she led hundreds of slaves to freedom along the Underground Railroad, a secret network of safe houses where runaway slaves could stay on their journey north to freedom. She later became a leader in the abolitionist movement, and during the Civil War she was a spy for the federal forces in South Carolina as well as a nurse. 

martin luther king jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. was the most important voice of the American civil rights movement, which worked for equal rights for all. He was famous for using nonviolent resistance to overcome injustice, and he never got tired of trying to end segregation laws (laws that prevented blacks from entering certain places, such as restaurants, hotels, and public schools). He also did all he could to make people realize that "all men are created equal." Because of his great work, in 1964 King received the Nobel Peace Prize -- the youngest person ever to receive this high honor. King was also a Baptist minister. He was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee, when he was just 39 years old. His birthday is now observed as a national holiday on the third Monday in January.

(http://www.americaslibrary.gov/aa/index.php)

Name: _____________________________________ Date: _____________________________

Biographies



Multiple Choice

Read the statements below and then select the best answer to fill in the blank. Write the letter of the best answer on the provided line. (2 Points Each)


__________ 1. A true story about a real person is a ____________________________.

    1. Expository Non-Fiction

    2. Folktale

    3. Biography

    4. Novel

__________ 2. The main character of a biography is called the ___________________.



  1. Main Event

  2. Subject

  3. Lead Character

  4. Star



True/False

Read each definition and decide whether it is true or false. Circle either true or false to mark your answer.

(2 Points Each)
True / False 3. Biographies are read differently than other non-fiction text because they

are stories.

True / False 4. Biographies are different from fiction books because the main characters

do not face struggles or difficulties.

True / False 5. A reader can learn about a biography’s main character by reading about his

or her actions.



Complete the Table

Look at the book covers below. Decide if each book is a biography or an expository non-fiction, then write the book title in the appropriate column. (2 Points Each)



http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_nh2idnvgs0y/tcc28-wt1di/aaaaaaaake0/y1toswidtgc/s1600/aearhart.jpg http://www.fireflybooks.com/media/475/9781554073450.jpg http://pn.b5z.net/i/u/6147086/i/obamasm.jpg http://www.aeroplanebooks.com/images/big-book-of-airplanes.jpg


Biography

Expository Non-Fiction







Short Answer

Read the biography passage on the next page. Then, answer the following questions.

10. Who is the subject of the biography? (2 Points)

__________________________________________________________________________

11. Name one struggle or hardship the subject faced. (2 Points)

__________________________________________________________________________

12. Name one of the subject’s achievements. (2 Points)

__________________________________________________________________________

13. Did the subject live in the same time period as you? Explain how you know. (4 Points)

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

14. How would you describe the subject of the biography? (Be sure to use at least one adjective.) (2 Points)

____________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________


Jesse Owens

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c5/jesse_owens3.jpg
Even at a young age, Jesse Owens was lightning fast. His elementary school gym teacher noticed Jesse's incredible speed after a short race in gym class. A track star at East Technical High School in Cleveland, OH, Jesse set the world record in the 100 yard dash with a time of 9.4 seconds. Jesse continued his record-setting ways At Ohio State University. In the 1935 Big Ten Championships, Jesse tied his 100 yard record and set world records in the 200 yards, the long jump and the 220 yard hurdles! That day is one of the greatest single-day performances in the history of sports.
Jesse grew up in a time and place where racial segregation was at its peak. Despite being a track star at Ohio State, Jesse had to stay in an all-black dorm off campus. He had to eat at all-black restaurants or get carry out at other restaurants. Even though he was the best track athlete in the world, he was not even eligible for a scholarship.
Jesse Owens walked into a hostile environment coming into the 1936 Olympic Games which was held in Berlin, Germany. At the time, Adolf Hitler was the leader in Germany and the Nazi movement. Hitler, who was largely responsible for World War II, tried to use the Olympic games to prove that the German race was superior to all other ethnicities. Jesse put to rest those claims as he stole the show by winning four gold medals - an Olympic record that stood until 1984. His victory allowed him to travel with and stay at the same hotel as white people. It was definitely a good start to the equal rights movement.
Name: __Answer Key_______________________________ Date: _______________________

Biographies



Multiple Choice

Read the statements below and then select the best answer to fill in the blank. Write the letter of the best answer on the provided line. (2 Points Each)


_____C_____ 1. A true story about a real person is a ____________________________.

    1. Expository Non-Fiction

    2. Folktale

    3. Biography

    4. Novel

_____B_____ 2. The main character of a biography is called the ___________________.



  1. Main Event

  2. Subject

  3. Lead Character

  4. Star



True/False

Read each definition and decide whether it is true or false. Circle either true or false to mark your answer.

(2 Points Each)
True / False 3. Biographies are read differently than other non-fiction text because they

are stories.

True / False 4. Biographies are different from fiction books because the main characters

do not face struggles or difficulties.



True / False 5. A reader can learn about a biography’s main character by reading about his

or her actions.



Complete the Table

Look at the book covers below. Decide if each book is a biography or an expository non-fiction, then write the book title in the appropriate column. (2 Points Each)


http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_nh2idnvgs0y/tcc28-wt1di/aaaaaaaake0/y1toswidtgc/s1600/aearhart.jpg http://www.fireflybooks.com/media/475/9781554073450.jpg http://pn.b5z.net/i/u/6147086/i/obamasm.jpg http://www.aeroplanebooks.com/images/big-book-of-airplanes.jpg


Biography

Expository Non-Fiction

-Who Was Amelia Earhart?

-Barack Obama

-500 Insects: A Visual Reference

-Big Book of Airplanes

Short Answer

Read the biography passage on the next page. Then, answer the following questions.

10. Who is the subject of the biography? (2 Points)

__Jesse Owens_____________________________________________________________

11. Name one struggle or hardship the subject faced. (2 Points)

__racial segregation / hostile environment at Olympics / not eligible for a scholarship__

12. Name one of the subject’s achievements. (2 Points)

__records set in college / won four gold medals at Olympics_______________________

13. Did the subject live in the same time period as you? Explain how you know. (4 Points)

__No_______________________________________________________________________

__dates given in article (1935 Big Ten Championship, 1936 Olympics) / segregation____

14. How would you describe the subject of the biography? (Be sure to use at least one adjective.) (2 Points)

__athletic, brave, determined, fast, courageous (answers will vary)________________

Jesse Owens

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c5/jesse_owens3.jpg
Even at a young age, Jesse Owens was lightning fast. His elementary school gym teacher noticed Jesse's incredible speed after a short race in gym class. A track star at East Technical High School in Cleveland, OH, Jesse set the world record in the 100 yard dash with a time of 9.4 seconds. Jesse continued his record-setting ways At Ohio State University. In the 1935 Big Ten Championships, Jesse tied his 100 yard record and set world records in the 200 yards, the long jump and the 220 yard hurdles! That day is one of the greatest single-day performances in the history of sports.
Jesse grew up in a time and place where racial segregation was at its peak. Despite being a track star at Ohio State, Jesse had to stay in an all-black dorm off campus. He had to eat at all-black restaurants or get carry out at other restaurants. Even though he was the best track athlete in the world, he was not even eligible for a scholarship.
Jesse Owens walked into a hostile environment coming into the 1936 Olympic Games which was held in Berlin, Germany. At the time, Adolf Hitler was the leader in Germany and the Nazi movement. Hitler, who was largely responsible for World War II, tried to use the Olympic games to prove that the German race was superior to all other ethnicities. Jesse put to rest those claims as he stole the show by winning four gold medals - an Olympic record that stood until 1984. His victory allowed him to travel with and stay at the same hotel as white people. It was definitely a good start to the equal rights movement.

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