Records of the lyndon b. Johnson space center



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PRELIMINARY INVENTORY OF THE
RECORDS OF THE
LYNDON B. JOHNSON SPACE CENTER


Record Group 255
Records of the
National Aeronautics

and

Space Administration
National Archives-Southwest Region
Fort Worth, Texas
Compiled by Kent Carter

October 18, 2016

CONTENTS


CONTENTS i

RECORDS OF THE LYNDON B. JOHNSON SPACE CENTER 1

RECORDS OF THE SPACE TASK GROUP 2

RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR 3

RECORDS OF THE PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE 6

RECORDS OF THE HISTORY OFFICE 7

RECORDS OF THE ADVANCED MISSIONS PROGRAM OFFICE (HA) 11

TECHNICAL PLANNING OFFICE (AT) 11

NEW INITIATIVES OFFICE (IA) 12

RECORDS OF THE ADMINISTRATION DIRECTORATE 13

Procurement Division (BD) 13

Program Procurement Division (BC) 14

Space Station Procurement Division (BF) 14

Administrative Services Division 14

Management Services Division 14

Publications Branch 14

Communications Services Branch 15

Facilities Division 15

Program Control Office 16

Management Analysis Office (BE) 16

Personnel Division (BP) 17

Program Support Division (BT) 18

Photographic Technology Lab 19

Program Operations Office (Wa) 19

Safety, Reliability And Quality Assurance Office 20

FLIGHT CREW OPERATIONS DIRECTORATE 21

Crew Support Division 24

Crew Training And Procedures Division (CG) 26

FLIGHT/MISSION OPERATIONS DIRECTORATE (CA) 27

RECORDS OF THE ENGINEERING AND DEVELOPMENT DIRECTORATE (EA) 32

Assistant Director For Advanced Planning And Design (EA) 32

Director Of Engineering (EA) 33

Advanced Spacecraft Technology Division 34

Crew Systems Division 34

Laboratory Operations Office 40

Experiment Systems Division 40

Chemical and Mechanical Systems Division 45

Landing Technology Branch 46

Computation and Analysis Division 46

Engineering and Analysis Division (EX) 47

Advanced Programs Office (ED) 49

Instrumentation And Electronic Systems Division (EE) 50

Structures And Mechanics Division (ES) 50

Systems Engineering Division (ET) 51

Spacecraft Design Division (EW) 51

Energy Systems Division (EP) 52

Thermochemical Test Branch 52

Battery and Pyrotechnics Branch 53

Project Support Branch (EP2) 53

EARTH RESOURCES PROGRAM OFFICE (HA) 54

RECORDS OF THE DATA SYSTEMS AND ANALYSIS DIRECTORATE (FA) 55

Mission Planning and Analysis Division 55

SCIENCE AND APPLICATIONS DIRECTORATE (TA) 56

LUNAR RECEIVING LABORATORY PROGRAM OFFICE 57

LIFE SCIENCES DIRECTORATE (DA) 58

MERCURY PROJECT OFFICE 59

GEMINI PROGRAM OFFICE 62

APOLLO SPACECRAFT PROGRAM OFFICE (PA) 67

APOLLO-SOYUZ TEST PROJECT OFFICE 78

APOLLO APPLICATIONS (SKYLAB) PROGRAM OFFICE (KA) 81

SPACE SHUTTLE PROGRAM OFFICE 85

Orbiter Project Office (MA) 88

Space Station Program Office (KA) 91

MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER 93

JOHN F. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER 93

LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER 94

Records Relating to Tracking and Ground Instrumentation 94

APPENDIX A 96

APPENDIX B 97

APPENDIX C 99

APPENDIX C-1 114

APPENDIX C-2 117

APPENDIX D 118

APPENDIX E 119

INDEX 120

RECORDS OF THE LYNDON B. JOHNSON SPACE CENTER

On November 5, 1958, a Space Task Group (STG) under Robert R. Gilruth was formed at NASA's Langley Research Center in Virginia to plan and implement a project to put a man in space (Project Mercury). In September 1961, NASA selected Houston as the site for a new facility and the STG was redesignated the Manned Spacecraft Center in November. The staff began moving into rented space in the Houston area in October 1962 and occupied the first permanent facilities at the Clear Lake site in February 1964. The Manned Spacecraft Center was renamed the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in February 1973.1


The Johnson Space Center is one of nine major NASA field installations. It has been responsible for developing the Gemini spacecraft, the Apollo command and service module, the lunar excursion module, the modified command and service modules used in Skylab and the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, and the Space Shuttle Orbiter. It has also been responsible for the selection and training of astronauts, the operation of manned flights, the development and integration of space flight experiments, studies of applications of space technology, and research in medical and space science.
The organizational structure of the Johnson Space Center has undergone numerous changes since 1961, but the basic pattern of offices responsible for specific projects supported by technical offices and administrative support offices remained fairly constant. Dr. Gilruth described the first organization as a “hardware development team … responsible for conceiving the plan (for Project Mercury), writing the specifications for it, and conducting the exercise with industry to get bids and select contractors ...the operations team which set up the method of operation and implemented it ...(and) the crew systems element responsible for selecting and training astronauts.”2 When President Kennedy announced the decision to undertake a moon-landing program, “the organization went from a single project organization for Mercury to a multiple project organization… We organized in the usual straightforward fashion. We simply instituted project offices and we tried to keep the project offices small, and drawing needed institutional support from other elements of the Center such as in the flight crew area, flight operations, basic engineering and science.”
The official history of JSC notes that “office designations and work assignments tended to be very fluid and amorphous during the early years.”3 The following inventory attempts to describe the records by the basic organizational unit that created them and notes changes of official title or major responsibilities in brief unit descriptions. The official issuances of JSC contain detailed functional descriptions and organizational charts and they are the best source of information about any specific unit.4
This inventory describes more than 8,600 cubic feet of records transferred to the legal custody of the National Archives-Southwest Region by NASA. Frustrated NASA employees allegedly complained that no booster rocket could be launched until the weight of the paper documentation equaled the weight of the machine and the NASA would reach the moon by stacking paper. The 8,600 cubic feet of records described in this inventory only weighs approximately 430,000 pounds which is much less than the weight of the Saturn V (6,487,354), but the 730 feet of Apollo Spacecraft Program Office files is approximately twice the height of the 363 foot rocket stack. It should also be noted that the volume of records expanded significantly with each new program. There are approximately 67 feet for Mercury, 201 feet for Gemini, 730 feet for Apollo, with a yet to be determined amount for the Shuttle.


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