Roger W. Smith



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20 January 1941 -- Dreiser’s America Is Worth Saving published by Modern Age Books.
March 1941 -- Twentieth Century-Fox buys film rights to Dreiser's "My Brother Paul," to be filmed under title My Gal Sal, for approximately $50,000.
17 March 1941 -- Dreiser, along with other intellectuals such as Richard Wright, addresses sixtieth birthday rally for Community Party USA official William Z. Foster at Madison Square Garden in New York. He calls Foster a saint, “my first and only contact with one.”
6 June 1941—The Fourth Congress of American Writers opens with a rally in New York City. Dreiser is awarded the Randolph Bourne Memorial Award by the League of American Writers, an organization formed by the Communist Party USA, because of Dreiser’s advocacy of peace. Dreiser, who was unable to attend, sends his “warm greetings.”
11 July 1941 -- The Girl in the Coffin premiers at the Village Playhouse, Institute, West Virginia, produced by West Virginia State College.
21 August 1941 -- The New York Times reports that Sister Carrie, "for several years regarded as Hollywood's most controversial story property," has been revived by RKO and will be filmed in the fall with Ruth Warrick in the title role.
2 November 1941 -- "Dreiser Asks End of Aid to British" (Indianapolis News).
25 March 1942 -- Dreiser signs agreement with the University of Pennsylvania for the deposit of his literary materials at the university library.
April 1942 -- My Gal Sal, a film loosely based on Dreiser's "My Brother Paul" (from Twelve Men) is released. Producer: Robert Bassler for Twentieth Century-Fox.
May 1942 -- G.P. Putnam's acquires rights to works by Theodore Dreiser from Simon & Schuster. The New York Times reports (11 May 1942) that "a new novel, called 'The Bulwark,' is expected for the Fall of this year."
May 1942 -- Dreiser has a change of heart after seeing Twentieth Century-Fox film My Gal Sal. He announces that The Titan, The Financier, and The “Genius” are available for filming.
September 1942 -- Dreiser, prior to a scheduled address in Toronto on September 21, makes incendiary anti-British remarks in an interview with the Toronto Evening Telegram. He is quoted as saying, "I would rather see Germans in England than the damn snobs we have there now" and calling the English "aristocratic, horse-riding snobs." The address is canceled. The Canadian government issues an order barring Dreiser from making any public statements or delivering speeches in Canada. Amidst reports that he may be arrested, Dreiser flees Canada by train.
23 September 1942 -- The London Daily Mail, in an open letter to Dreiser, states, "the half-baked isolationism you are still crying is now dead and damned."
24 September 1942 -- Dreiser is spotted by reporters in Port Huron, Michigan hotel, where he had been hiding out. (He had registered in the hotel as “T. H. Dreiser of Los Angeles.”) He describes himself, to a Port Huron Times-Herald reporter, as “the No. 1 victim of the four freedoms.” He asserts that England is not giving enough aid to Russia.
24 September 1942 -- The Writers' War Board, an organization of US authors dedicated to furthering the war effort, condemns Dreiser for his anti-British remarks in Toronto interview.
30 September 1942 -- In an interview with a reporter for the Indianapolis Star, Dreiser says that remarks attributed to him in Toronto that he “would rather see the Germans” than the English aristocracy in Britain were a misquotation.
1 October 1942 -- Sara White Dreiser, Dreiser’s estranged wife, dies in St. Louis.
4 October 4, 1942 -- The Indianapolis Star quotes Dreiser regarding what he intended to say in the speech that he was barred from making in Toronto: “what I meant to do in Canada was to picture the world ahead, if we win and if we lose, and to plead for immediate aid to Russia as the only means of winning. I didn’t say and didn’t mean that I hoped England would be defeated by Hitler.”
7 October 1942 -- in a letter to the Writers’ War Board, Dreiser formally responds to criticisms of anti-British remarks that caused him to be banned from speaking in Toronto in September. He criticizes the board of classifying him as a supporter of Hitler and enemy of the Allies without “troubling to investigate the facts” concerning his remarks in Toronto. “I did not ally myself with Hitler and I did denounce the titled and moneyed class of England which I held and still hold to be responsible for the allies’ failure to aid Russia.”
March 1943 -- Monogram Studio announces it has signed Dreiser to write an original screenplay, “Lady, Let’s Dance,” in which Belita, the ice skating star, will be featured (Los Angeles Times).
1944 -- Spanish translation of The “Genius” published in Argentina. Russian translation of The Financier by Mark Volosov published.
19 May 1944 -- Dreiser receives Award of Merit Medal and $1,000 cash prize from American Academy of Arts and Letters for his contribution to American letters. He travels to New York for the last time to receive award.
13 June 1944 -- Dreiser marries his long-time mistress, Helen Esther Richardson (nee Patges), with whom he is related on his mother's side (they are first cousins once removed), in a civil ceremony in Stevenson, Skamania County, Washington. The marriage record gives the groom’s name as “Herman Dreiser,” apparently because Dreiser wanted to avoid publicity.
1945 -- Italian translation of Jennie Gerhardt published. Spanish translations of The Titan and An American Tragedy published in Argentina. Portuguese translation of An American Tragedy by Lauro Escorial published in Brazil (São Paulo).
20 July 1945 -- In a letter to William Z. Foster, General Secretary of the Communist Party of the United States, Dreiser joins the party in an act of public defiance.
20 September 1945 -- Dreiser sister Sylvia Dreiser Kishima, age 80, dies at her sister’s Mame’s home in Astoria, Queens, NY of heart disease.
28 December 1945 -- Dreiser dies at age 74 of a heart attack at his home, 1015 North Kings Road, Hollywood.
31 December 1945 -- In an article in PM, Max Lerner calls Dreiser “the greatest American writer of the twentieth century … a plebian artist" with Middle Western roots who told his own story with honesty and courage and in doing so told the story of the American people.
31 December 1945 – "Los Angeles Communists to Honor Dreiser's Memory,” an article in the Daily Worker, quotes the county committee of the Communist Party of Los Angeles regarding Dreiser's achievements and announces a plan to honor him at "the Lenin memorial meeting" on January 27, 1946.
3 Jan 1946 – Dreiser is buried in Forest Lawn Cemetery, Glendale, CA. A funeral service is held at the Church of the Recessional, the cemetery chapel. The service is jointly conducted by the minister, Rev. Dr. Allan A. Hunter, of the Mt. Hollywood Congregational Church; the playwright John Howard Lawson; and Charlie Chaplin, who reads from a Dreiser poem, ‘The Road I Came.”
1946 -- Portuguese translation of Sister Carrie by Moacir Augusto published in Brazil (Rio De Janiero). Chinese translation of Sister Carrie by Xianmin Zhong published (Shanghai).
5 January 1946 -- "Theodore Dreiser, 1871-1945," an article by Edwin Berry Burgum in New Masses, laments the fact that Dreiser, who devoted his life to truth, was denied truthful obituaries by an American press disaffected by his membership in the Communist Party. Obituaries of Dreiser are, in fact, paltry, formulaic, and tepid, and there are few original ones.
12 January 1946 -- "Theodore Dreiser: In Memoriam" by James T. Farrell is published in the Saturday Review.
1 February 1946 -- Dreiser's will is filed for probate. He left his entire estate, the value of which was estimated in excess of $10,000, to his widow, Helen. She was requested to pay one-twentieth in income from the estate each to Dreiser’s brother Edward Dreiser and Dreiser’s sister Mrs. Sylvia Kishima, and one-tenth to his niece Gertrude Hopkins Dorn (aka Gertrude A. Hopkins). The will also requested that upon Helen Dreiser’s decease, one-tenth each of the remaining estate be left to his brother Edward and sister Sylvia and one-fourth to his niece Gertrude, with the balance to be left to an orphanage for black children.
21 March 1946 -- The Bulwark is published posthumously by Doubleday.
7 September 1946 – Dreiser’s long lost brother Al dies in Los Angeles. The death certificate gives his name as Albert Joseph Dresser
1947 -- Best Short Stories of Theodore Dreiser, an anthology comprised of four stories from Free and Other Stories, eight from Chains, and two sketches from Twelve Men, is published by World Publishing, with an introduction by Howard Fast.
1947 -- Finnish translation of An American Tragedy by Lauri Miettinen published. The Bulwark is published in German under the title Solon der Quäker: Roman (Zurich, 1947). Dutch translation of The Bulwark by R. W. B. Engler published. Hungarian translation of The Bulwark by Tivadar Szinai published. Spanish translation of The Bulwark by Horcio Laurora published (Buenos Aires). Swedish translation of The Bulwark by Aida Törnell published. Chinese translation of An American Tragedy by Xianmin Zhong published (Shanghai).
7 March 1947 -- A commemorative ceremony for Dreiser, at which H. L. Mencken delivers a eulogy, is held at the Los Angeles Public Library.



6 November 1947 -- The Stoic is published posthumously by Doubleday.


1948 -- An American Tragedy is republished by The World Publishing Company with a new introduction by H. L. Mencken.
1948 -- Bulgarian translation of Jennie Gerhardt by Boris Tabakov published. Bulgarian translation of The Financier published. Bulgarian translation of The Titan by Radka Krapcheve published. Chinese translation of The “Genius” published (Shanghai). Serbo-Croatian translation of An American Tragedy by Berislav Grgić published. Dutch translation of The Bulwark by R. W. B. Engler published. Danish translation of The Bulwark by Tom Kristensen published. French translation of The Bulwark published. German translation of The Bulwark by Carl Bach published under the title Solon der Quäker. The Lost Phoebe and Other Stories, translated by Yaomian Huang, is published in Chinese. “Married” and other stories published in China in a dual language edition with Chinese translation by Xianmin Zhong (Shanghai).
1948 -- Robert H. Elias's Theodore Dreiser: Apostle of Nature, the first critical biography of Dreiser, is published by Knopf.
1948-49 -- Slovenian translation of An American Tragedy published.
1949 -- Polish translation of Sister Carrie by Zofia Popławska published. Chinese translation of Sister Carrie published (Shanghai). Jennie Gerhardt published in Chinese, translated by Baoguang Zhu (Shanghai). Serbo-Croatian translation of The Titan by Olga Maryanovich published. Chinese translation of The “Genius” by Xianmin Zhong published (Shanghai).
1949 – The University of Pennsylvania purchases Dreiser’s manuscripts and the majority of his books from his widow, Helen Dreiser, for $16,500
1950 -- Latvian translation of The Titan by Anna Bauga published. Lithuanian translation of The “Genius” published. Serbo-Croatian translation of An American Tragedy by Zhivoiin Simi published. Japanese translation of An American Tragedy published (Tokyo: Hayakawa Shobo). Bulgarian translation of The Bulwark by I. L’akov and N. Aleksilev published. Polish translation of The Bulwark by Tadeusz Jakubowicz published.
1951 --Dreiser’s widow Helen suffers a cerebral hemorrhage.
1951 -- Italian translation of Sister Carrie by Gabriele Baldini published under the title Nostra Sorella Carrie. Chinese translation of An American Tragedy by Zhong xian min published (Shanghai). Hungarian translation of Tragic America by Iván Boldizsár published. Norwegian translation of The Bulwark by A. W. Gammelgaard published.
1951 -- F. O. Matthiessen's study Theodore Dreiser is published posthumously by William Sloane Associates, comprised of a brief biography, an analysis of Dreiser’s major works, and a study of Dreiser’s philosophy.
July 1951 -- Premiere of The Prince Who Was a Thief, a film based on a Dreiser story. Producer: Leonard Goldstein for Universal-International.
August 1951 -- Premiere of A Place in the Sun, a new film version of An American Tragedy directed by George Stevens which is received favorably by critics. Producer: Paramount.
1952 -- George Steinbrecher, Jr.'s article " Inaccurate Accounts of Sister Carrie" in American Literature reveals facts, as reported by articles in Chicago newspaper (contemporary accounts hitherto unknown to Dreiser scholars), underlying the actual events in Chicago underlying Hurstwood's theft and flight with Carrie to Montreal, noting errors in previous scholarly accounts which discuss this episode as a source for Sister Carrie.
1952 –Robert P. Saalbach, “Collected Poems - Theodore Dreiser, Edited with an Introduction and Notes,” dissertation, University of Washington. For the dissertation, Saalbach collected and edited 502 Dreiser poems.
1952 -- Teodor Draizer v bor'be protiv amerikanskogo imperializma [Theodore Dreiser in the struggle against American imperialism] by Iasen Nikolaevich Zasurskii and Roman Mikhailovich Samarin is published (Moscow: MGU), a study in Russian of writings by Dreiser which are critical of the United States.
1952 -- Italian translation of Sister Carrie by Aenese Silvestri published under the title Gli Occhi Che Non Sorrisero. Spanish translation of Twelve Men published. Azeri translation of An American Tragedy published (Azerbaijan, USSR). Russian translation (abridged) of Tragic America by E. Kalashnikovataiâ and O. Kholmskaiâ, with an introduction by I. Anisimov, published. Italian translation of The Bulwark published. Japanese translation of The Bulwark by Tsutomu Veda published.
June 1952 -- Carrie, a film based on Sister Carrie directed by William Wyler, is released. Producer: Paramount.
July 1952 – Soviets announce that a new 12-volume edition of the works of Dreiser is being published in the USSR in a printing of 75,000 copies.
1952 -- An American Tragedy published in a Chinese translation by Yin Gu (Taipei).
1953 – George Steinbrecher, Jr.’s "Theodore Dreiser's Fictional Method in Sister Carrie and Jennie Gerhardt" (Ph.D. dissertation, U of Chicago) "identifies the source material for Dreiser's 'sister' novels and explains how and why the facts were altered for the fictional rendering" (as per annotation in Theodore Dreiser: A Primary Bibliography and Reference Guide, Second Edition; edited by Donald Pizer, Richard W. Dowell, and Fredric E. Rusch; Boston: G. K. Hall, 1991).
1953 – John F.Castle’s "The Making of An American Tragedy" (Ph.D. dissertation, University of Michigan) provides an examination of Dreiser's use of Gillette case sources.
1953 – Thomas Kranidas’s "The Materials of Theodore Dreiser's An American Tragedy" (master's thesis, Columbia University) provides a fresh look at Dreiser and a valuable piece of Dreiser criticism, focusing on Dreiser’s weaknesses as a writer, his intellectual shortcomings, and limitations in his worldview, yet at the same time not neglecting his strengths as exhibited in An American Tragedy.
1953 -- A report by Sydney Horovitz in the American Philosophical Society Year Book provides a preliminary analysis of materials in the University of Pennsylvania’s Dreiser collection which will provide content later published (in part) as Dreiser’s Notes on Life.
1953 -- Norwegian translation of Sister Carrie by Alf Harbitz published. Japanese translation of Sister Carrie by Jiro Ozu published. Lithuanian translation of An American Tragedy. Chinese translation of The Bulwark published, translated by Ruzhi Xü (Shanghai). German translation of The Stoic by Paul Baudisch published (Zurich).
1954 -- The Dusk in Twilight (Carrie), an abridged translation by Takashi Murakawa, is published in Japanese. Italian translation of The “Genius" published. Romanian translation of An American Tragedy by Leon D. Leviţchi and Pericle Martinescu published. Chinese translation of An American Tragedy published (Taipei). Chinese translation of An American Tragedy by Ruzhi Xu published (Shanghai).
February 1954 -- Lux Video Theater presents an hour-long television dramatization of An American Tragedy, which it gives title A Place in the Sun in the expectation that more people will have seen the film than read the book and more viewers will thus be likely to watch the television show.
summer 1954 -- In “Theodore Dreiser’s Notes on Life,” an article in The Library Chronicle (published by the University of Pennsylvania libraries), Dreiser collection curator Neda Westlake provides a description of the contents of two metal trunks -- included in the materials bequeathed to the library by Dreiser’s widow Helen, which were the last of the papers to be added to the Dreiser collection -- containing clippings, notes from Dreiser’s reading, and unfinished chapters of what Dreiser had conceived of as a work outlining his personal philosophy. An abridgment of these materials was later published in book form as Notes on Life.
23 November 1954 -- Sandhog, a play based on Dreiser's "St. Columba and the River" in a dramatization by Earl Robinson and Waldo Salt, premiers at the Phoenix Theatre, New York.
1954 -- An article by Lester Cohen, “Theodore Dreiser: A Personal Memoir,” is published in discovery no. 4 (Pocket Books, Inc.).
1955 -- Die Romane Theodore Dreisers by Karl-Heinz Wirzberger is published (Berlin).
1955 -- Slovenian translation of Sister Carrie by Mira Mihelič published. Ukrainian translation of Sister Carrie published. Hungarian translation of The Financier by Merényi Kvk published. Serbo-Croatian translation of The “Genius” by Ilija M. Petrović published. Russian translation of The “Genius” published. Italian translation of The Financier by Violani Cancogni published. Estonian and Ukrainian translations of An American Tragedy published. Chinese translation of The “Genius” by Xiamin Zhong published (Taipei, Taiwan). Chinese translation by Ningkun Wu of selected short stories by Dreiser published (Shanghai). Sobranie Sochinenii v Dvenadtsati Tomakh [Collected Works in Twelve Volumes] by Dreiser published in Russian (Moscow: Pravda; reprinted 1973).
22 September 1955 -- Dreiser’s second wife, Helen, dies in Gresham, Oregon at the home of her sister.
26 October 1955- A hearing is held in Burbank, California on the disposition of the estate of Dreiser’s widow Helen Dreiser. The estate is valued at approximately $100,000. The will stipulates that the estate be divided among seven beneficiaries, including an orphanage for black children, 20 percent; Mrs. Chester A. Butcher ( Dreiser’s sister-in-law), 20 percent; his brother Edward Dreiser, 10 percent; his niece Gertrude Hopkins Dorn, 25 percent; his niece Vera Dreiser Scott, 10 percent; Harold J. Dies (a cousin of Dreiser’s second wife Helen and Trustee of the Dreiser Trust), 5 percent; and Phrizoe P. Nazir, an artist who lived at the Dreiser home (and was a lover of Dreiser’s widow), 5 percent. The will also provides that Mrs. Butcher, Dies, and Nazir share the Dreiser home at 1015 Kings Road in Hollywood.
1956 -- Best Short Stories of Theodore Dreiser is republished by World Publishing with a new introduction by James T. Farrell, which is significant because the previous introduction had been written by Howard Fast, who had been blacklisted for being a Communist Party member.
1956 -- Serbo-Croatian translation of The Financier by Vjekoslav Suzanić published. Serbo-Croatian translation of The Titan by Mira Kučić published. Serbo-Croatian translation of The Stoic by Franjo Bukovšek published. Turkish translation of An American Tragedy by Hâle Kuntay published under the title Insanlik suçu. Selections from Free and Other Stories published in Hungarian. Chinese translation of The “Genius”, translated by Wan Zhu and Hai Xi, published (Shanghai). Hungarian edition of short stories by Dreiser, translated by Báti László, published.
1957 -- Revised Czech translation of Sister Carrie by Alena Jindrová-Spilarová and Miroslav Jindra published. Serbo-Croatian translation of Sister Carrie by Vlatko Šarić published. Romanian, and Turkish translations of Sister Carrie published. Slovak translation of Jennie Gerhardt published. Jennie Gerhardt published in Azeri (Azerbaijan, USSR). Latvian translation of An American Tragedy. Russian translation of The Stoic by M. Bogoslovskaiâ and T. Kurivtsevaiâ published.
1957 -- Teodor Drazer: Pisatel' i Publitsist [Theodore Dreiser: Writer and publicist] by Y. N. Zasurski published in USSR.
13 December 1957 -- The New York Times announces that Dreiser’s novel The Titan will be made into a film in a joint production by Security Pictures and Anthony Mann Productions with production to begin in the spring.
1958 -- Russian translation of Sister Carrie by M. Volosov published. Bulgarian translation of Sister Carrie published. Lithuanian translation of The Financier by K. Viaras-Račkauskas published. Chinese translation of The Titan by Wei Cong published (Shanghai). Serbo-Croatian translation of The Bulwark. An American Tragedy is published in Hebrew in an abridged translation by Avraham Aharoni (Tel Aviv).
29 January 1958 -- Dreiser’s brother Edward Minerod Dreiser dies in Queens, NYC.
1959 -- Letters of Theodore Dreiser, edited by Robert H. Elias, is published in three volumes by the University of Pennsylvania Press. The editor notes in the Preface that letters “that simply record data, biographical or bibliographical, or that are primarily love letters” have been excluded.
1959 -- Chinese translation of Sister Carrie published, translated by Hsien-min Chung (Taiwan). Korean translation of Sister Carrie (along with The Pearl by John Steinbeck) published. Serbo-Croatian translation of Jennie Gerhardt by Mirko Jović published. Chinese translation of Jennie Gerhardt by Donghua Fu published (Shanghai). The “Genius”, translated by Chi-yuk Wai, published in Chinese (Hong Kong). Serbo-Croatian translation of The Bulwark by Zarja Vuklčevič published. Lithuanian translation of The Titan by M. Kazlauskaite and J. Subatvičius published. Ukrainian translation of The Stoic.
1960 -- Estonian translation of Sister Carrie published. Finnish translation of Jennie Gerhardt. Lithuanian translation of The Stoic.
1961 -- Serbo-Croatian translation of Jennie Gerhart by Mirko Jovic published. Czech translation of The Financier by Emanuela and Emanuel Tilschovi published. Chinese translation of The Titan published, translated by Ruzhi Xu. Serbo-Croatian translation of A Gallery of Women by Vjekoslav Suzanić published. Spanish translation of An American Tragedy by Mariano Orta Manzano published (Barcelona).
August 7, 1961 -- Margaret May (Steinman) Dresser, the widow of Dreiser’s brother Al, dies in Camarillo State Hospital in Camarillo, Ventura County, California.



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