27 February 2013 economics 303Y1 The Economic History of Modern Europe to1914 Prof. John Munro Lecture Topic No. 24: V. The rapid industrialization of germany, 1815 1914



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Prof. John H. Munro munro5@chass.utoronto.ca

Department of Economics john.munro@utoronto.ca

University of Toronto http://www.economics.utoronto.ca/munro5/

27 February 2013


ECONOMICS 303Y1


The Economic History of Modern Europe to1914
Prof. John Munro
Lecture Topic No. 24:


V. THE RAPID INDUSTRIALIZATION OF GERMANY, 1815 - 1914

F. GERMAN INDUSTRIALIZATION, 1850 - 1914


F. GERMAN INDUSTRIALIZATION, 1850 - 1914
1. Introduction: The Beginnings or ‘Take-Off’ of German Industrialization

a) During the later 18th and early 19th centuries:

i) certainly many regions of Germany experienced some significant economic development, during the later 18th and early 19th centuries.


  1. especially in the Berlin, Hamburg, Cologne [Köln], Dresden, and Frankfurt-am-Main regions.

  2. Hamburg and the other former Hanse towns (Bremen and Lübeck) remained important for commerce

ii) German towns of the old Hanseatic League:

(1) the following German commercial towns had been the most important components of the former Hanseatic League, which had dominated northern European commerce from the later 13th to 16th centuries:



  1. the German Baltic towns, led by Hamburg and Lübeck,

  2. and the German Rhenish towns, led by Cologne, another major former Hanseatic town.

(2) their subsequent relative decline in international commerce did not mean that they became economically unimportant.

(3) Hamburg in particular remained one of Europe’s leading shipping and commercial centres

iii) Trebilcock: notes a long, slow, but important period of economic development, 1780-1850; and this you can read for yourselves, of course.1

b) But that economic growth was generally slow and quite uneven up to the 1850s:

(1) in agriculture, industry, banking, foreign trade, etc.;

(2) and thus Germany was well behind France and the Low Countries, not to mention Britain.

c) From the 1850s, there is much more rapid growth and discernible industrialization, so that we might talk of a ‘take-off’, involving the following factors already discussed:

i) market: unification of the domestic market through the Zollverein.

ii) transport: establishment of the chief railway lines to link up Germany's natural resources (especially coal and iron), major towns, and seaports; and also parallel development of canals.

iii) Agrarian reform: 1850 Emancipation Law marked new and more rapid phase of land reform (especially benefiting the East German Junkers).

iv) Banking: Establishment of the first great investment banks in the 1850s.

d) Textiles: marked initial phase of modern industrialization

i) Cottons: In Germany, as elsewhere, the cotton industry was the first industry to mechanize, in adopting a modern factory system of powered production, as elsewhere.

ii) But the German cotton industry could hardly compete with the British cotton industry: in lacking the British access to American cotton, and lacking access to those large overseas markets that Britain possessed.

iii) Despite the very impressive growth of the German cotton industry,

(1) it never really competed with the British;

(2) and in 1914, it had only 20% of the physical capacity of the British cotton industry.

e) Metallurgy: the Coal, Iron, and Steel Industries:

i) These proved to be the true spearheads of German industrialization, as was true almost everywhere from mid-19th century.

ii) 1850s: discovery of vast quantities of excellent quality coking coal, in the Ruhr River valley and the Rhineland-Westphalia.

(1) both the discovery and the exploitation of these coal fields was result of railway surveying and construction.

(2) Previously Germany's known and available coal deposits were of mediocre quality;



  1. in contrast, these Ruhr-Rhineland deposits were not only so very excellent in coking quality,

  2. but also so extensive that they accounted for 50% of western Europe's total coal supplies.

(3) That coal made this Rhineland-Ruhr region the true industrial heartland of modern Germany, indeed of western Europe, up to the present day.

iii) Legal Reforms of 1851: the Prussian government liberalized mining laws, promoting coal mining (controlled the Rhineland region).


2. Chief Features of German Industrialization, 1870 - 1914

a) This period overall is the one during which German industrialization rapidly advances, to overtake not only France and Belgium, but also Great Britain in many key fields: in steel, electrical, chemicals industries.

b) Major Features of German industrialization in post-1870 era:

i) Very close links between science and industry, with German scientific leadership in many fields: especially electrical and chemical.

ii) Tariffs: the Return to protectionism in both industry and agriculture: from 1879, a high tariff structure was restored and then raised even further.

iii) Leadership role of the investment banks in heavy industry:

iv) Industrial amalgamations and cartels: from both industrial protectionism and investment banks.

v) This era, however, is usually divided into two, in surveying trends in European economic development: 1873-1896 and 1896-1914.

c) The Period 1873 - 1896: the ‘Great Depression’ era. Was it also an era of depression for Germany?

i) The year 1873 did mark the beginning of an international financial crisis, with some slumps in international trade that can be seen reflected in the export statistics for Britain and France, especially 1875 - 1885 [see Table 8, in the appendix: landscape format]

ii) Furthermore, the entire period was generally deflationary: almost universally true.

iii) Foreign Trade: Germany's exports continued to rise, however, until the mid 1880s, when they reached a plateau that lasted a decade, until the mid 1890s, when a new and much more powerful export boom ensued.

iv) Agriculture:

(1) In the 1870s and again in the 1880s, both German agriculture and some German industries suffered a fairly severe slump, so that

(2) both agriculture (faced with a flood of cheap grain imports) and heavy industry now clamoured for protection, which they soon received, in increased tariffs

v) Tariffs: as just noted, the German imperial government, though Prussian based, succumbed to this pressure and jettisoned its long-held free trade policies to restore protectionism, beginning with high tariffs in 1879 for grain, iron, steel products.

vi) But the second half of this so-called ‘Great Depression’ period, from 1882 to 1896, witnessed Germany's fastest industrial growth rate so far in the 19th century: at 4.5% per annum

vii) The table on comparative industrial growth rates: shows that Germany experienced continuous growth in industrial output over the entire period 1870 to 1914, with much faster growth rates than the U.K. or France (and surpassed only by the U.S.).



Indices of Industrial Output*: in the United Kingdom, France, Germany, and the United States in quinquennial means, 1860-4 to 1910-13

Mean of 1870-4 = 100


Period United France Germany United

Kingdom States




1860-64

72.6










1865-69

82.8

95.8

72.6

75.5

1870-74

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1875-79

105.5

109.5

120.8

111.4

1880-84

123.4

126.6

160.6

170.4

1885-89

129.5

130.3

194.9

214.9

1890-94

144.2

151.5

240.6

266.4

1895-99

167.4

167.8

306.4

314.2

1900-04

181.1

176.1

354.3

445.7

1905-09

201.1

206.2

437.4

570.0

1910-13

219.5

250.2

539.5

674.9



* Excluding construction, but including building materials.


Source: W. Arthur Lewis, Growth and Fluctuations, 1870 - 1913 (London, 1978), pp. 248-50, 269, 271, 273.
d) The Period 1896 - 1914 for German Industrialization:

i) In terms of international trade and capital investments, this was a boom period, and also one of renewed inflation lasting until World War I.

ii) In this period specifically, Germany overtook Britain in steel production: or rather in certain aspects of steel production.

iii) more importantly, Germany established world supremacy in two new key industries: the chemical and electrical industries.

iv) German industrial amalgamation and cartelisation: became much more pronounced during this period.


  1. German Mastery in the Steel Industry

a) Comments on German coal and iron production: as prelude to the history of German mastery in the steel industry:

i) coal: statistics up to World War I (1914)

(1) note from the statistics on the screen that Germany rapidly overtook France in coal production, producing more than double the French coal output by the 1870s;

(2) but Germany never succeeded in overtaking Britain in aggregate coal production.


Output of Coal in Millions of Metric Tons:
For Selected European Countries, Decennial Means: 1820/9 - 1910/3


Decade

Great Britain

Belgium

France

Germany

Russia




1820-9

20.00

n.a.

1.30

1.40

n.a.

1830-9

25.45

2.75

2.45

2.45

n.a.

1840-9

40.40

4.60

3.95

5.25

n.a

1850-9

59.00

7.70

6.45

11.95

n.a

1860-9

95.50

11.35

11.35

25.90

0.45

1870-9

129.45

14.70

16.20

45.65a

1.60

1880-9

163.40

17.95

20.85

71.90b

4.35

1890-9

194.15

20.70

28.45

107.05c

9.05

1900-9

245.30

24.05

34.70

179.25d

20.50

1910-3

275.40

24.80

39.90

247.50

30.20





Germany: proportion of total coal output accounted for by lignite:

a. in 1871 22.4%

b. in 1880 20.5%

c. in 1890 21.4%

d. in 1900 27.0%

e. in 1910 31.3%


1 metric tonne = 1000 kilograms = 2,204.6 lb.
Source: Carlo Cipolla, ed., Fontana Economic History of Europe, Vol. IV:2, p. 770.
ii) German Iron production:

(1) Germany was not as rich in iron ore as in coal,



(2) and thus the Germans had to import much of their iron ore,

  1. even after the acquisition of Lorraine from France in 1871 (Franco-Prussian War),

  2. though they imported considerably less iron than before, of course.

(3) France and Germany: comparisons of industrial production

  1. From the table on the screen, we can see that as late as 1860, Germany was still behind France in iron production,

  2. but Germany had overtaken France by 1880;

(4) Germany did not, however, overtake Britain until just after 1900.
Decennial Averages of the Output of Pig Iron and

Steel in France, Germany, Russia, and the United

Kingdom, in millions of metric tons,
1830-9 to 1910-3 (iron) and 1870-9 to 1910-3 (steel)
Index: mean of 1880-9 = 100. 1 metric ton = 1000 kg. = 2,204.6 lb.


Decade

France

Index

Germ-any

Index

Russia

Index

U.K.

Index




IRON PRODUCTION




1830-9

0.286

16

0.129

4

0.172

31

0.921

11

1840-9

0.442

25

0.172

5

0.192

35

1.625

20

1850-9

0.731

25

0.334

5

0.243

44

3.150

39

1860-9

1.164

66

0.813

25

0.304

56

4.602

57

1870-9

1.337

75

1.678

52

0.400

73

6.648

81

1880-9

1.772

100

3.217

100

0.547

100

8.040

100

1890-9

2.192

124

5.155

160

1.539

281

8.090

101

1900-9

3.028

171

9.296

289

2.786

509

9.317

116

1910-13

4.664

263

14.836

461

3.870

707

9.792

122


STEEL PRODUCTION


1870-9

0.260*

52







0.080*

33

0.695

30

1880-9

0.500

100

1.320

100

0.240

100

2.340

100

1890-9

1.015

203

3.985

302

0.930

388

3.760

161

1900-9

2.175

435

9.505

720

2.490

1038

5.565

238

1910-13

4.090

818

16.240

1230

4.200

1750

6.930

296






*1875-9 only.
b) The German Steel Industry: slow growth in the early years

i) as noted, Britain had led the way during the first generation of the Steel Revolution, during the 1860s and 1870s, in both output and productivity.

ii) As also noted, most of Germany's own iron ores were phosphoric, and thus contaminated

(1) initially that phosphoric contamination made these ores quite useless for steel-making; and

(2) thus Germany was forced to import not only haematite iron ores

(3) but also foreign pig iron for steelmaking.

iii) The 1878 Gilchrist-Thomas Basic process of steel making,

(1) thus provided Germany with the necessary means, in a crucial turning point, to utilize profitably the vast deposits of minette or phosphoric iron ore

(2) and especially those deposits in recently acquired Lorraine, from Prussia’s 1871 victory over France (Franco-Prussian war: 1870-71).

c) Protective Tariffs, Cartels, and Growth of the German Steel Industry:

i) Tariffs:

(1) the early years of the German steel era had been marked by Free Trade, with negligible tariffs on iron and steel – because Prussia was still essentially agrarian and pro- Free Trade;

(2) indeed tariffs were virtually eliminated in 1877.

ii) Depression in the 1870s:

(1) But the aftermath of the 1873 financial crisis and the ensuing trade depression of the later 1870s ended that Free Trade era, just two years later, in 1879

(2) when both agricultural and industrial interests combined to demand protection: what is called the ‘Union of Pork and Iron’.

iii) Protective Tariffs of 1879 was the response:

(1) tariffs ranging from 15% to 25% ad valorem on iron and steel products,

(2) and these remained basically unchanged until World War I.

iv) How important were such tariffs, since historians agree that the major growth of the German steel industry came only from the 1880s?

v) German tariffs, Cartels (Kartells) and Cartelisation:

(1) Perhaps the most important consequence of these tariffs was to promote the development of cartels: monopolistic syndicates or combines:

(2) i.e., by excluding foreign competitive products that could undersell the cartel or disrupt their market sharing schemes.

vi) Investment Banks, the State and Cartels: at the same time, however, we mus not neglect the role of two other institutions and factors: in promoting cartelisation

(1) the great German Investment Banks, or Universal Banks: for all the reasons discussed in the previous lecture

(2) The dual role of the state: the government of the German Reich or Empire: in Berlin



  1. in the first place, of course, tariffs were imposed by the state, as part of government overall economic policy

  2. but as well the government upheld the legitimacy of cartel organization and cartel structures

  3. and so did the Supreme Court of Germany, as an arm of the state

vii) On growth of cartels in iron and steel, read Clive Trebilcock: 2

(1) First significant cartel was the German Rail Federation of 1876,

(2) followed by the first of the Pig Iron Syndicates in 1879.

(3) These began as regional or state cartels and became fully national cartels in late 1880s and 1890s, culminating in German Pig Iron Syndicate in 1896;

(4) in 1904, the Stahlwerksverband (national syndicate of all heavy steel producers).

(5) The only major holdout was the Phoenix steelworks;

(6) but the investment banks, allied with other leaders in the German steel industry, used their 15

financial power, via the shares it held in this company, to force the Phoenix company to join the cartel.

(7) And these contractual agreements for cartelisation were subsequently upheld by the German courts.

viii) The Cartels’s selling policies:

(1) An important method of maintaining their market control was in offering purchasers 5% discounts if they made all their purchases exclusively from the cartel.

(2) Outsiders were either:



  1. too small to undercut the cartel or

  2. too fearful of retaliation to do so (i.e., fearing oligopolistic price-cutting to drive them out).

ix) By 1900, the cartels were responsible for over 80% of Germany's pig iron and steel output.

e) Economic Significance of German Steel Cartels:

i) Negative or Positive? cartels and other business combines are usually seen to be negative in their consequences,

(1) particularly in misallocating resources and

(2) in charging consumers higher, monopolistic prices.

ii) For alternative view, we shall consider the classic article of Steven Webb (1980).3

iii) His key point is that cartels encouraged, indeed forced vertical integration upon the German steel industry:

(1) vertical integration in the sense that the major steel firms owned their own coal and iron mines, blast furnaces for pig irone, Bessemer Converters, Open Hearths, rolling mills for finished steel, etc.

(2) but vertical integration also led to horizontal integrations – amalgamations

iv) Cartels made German steel manufacturers integrate downward in order to avoid paying cartel prices for their inputs: such as coal and pig iron.

(1) Thus a vertically integrated steel firm paid only the cost price for the required pig iron and coal, while a firm not so integrated would pay about 33% more for the same pig iron.

(2) By 1900, about 76% of total German pig iron was produced by such vertically integrated steelworks.

iii) Economic Advantages of Vertical Integration:

(1) Technological: Significant fuel economies by producing steel in ‘one heat’: i.e.,



  1. in using the pig iron directly before it cooled down, without having to reheat the cold pig iron (bought from another firm);

  2. and similarly in rolling and cutting steel to finished sizes while the metal was still hot, and thus easier to work.

(2) Significant savings on transportation, transaction and administrative costs: centralized production, with one centralized administration, instead of half dozen or so administrative setups.

(3) Vertical integration naturally encouraged much larger units of production with much more extensive mechanization: thus increased economies of scale from vertical integration.

f) The Landes-McCloskey Debate:

i) Long before Webb, in 1969, David Landes had alluded to many of these same arguments in his book The Unbound Prometheus:4

(1) in discussing cartelisation, amalgamation, and the growth of very large scale units in the German steel industry, Landes pointedly observed that German steelmakers ‘put big and big together, while the British kept small and small apart’:

(2) i.e., the British, with free trade and a legal system insisting much more strongly on competitive markets, had a steel industry with much smaller, competing units, and no really effective cartels.

ii) He made the following points in his comparisons: and in fact all of these points were reiterated by Steven Webb:

(1) that German steel plants were about four times the size of the British;

(2) that the larger scale German firms were far more extensively mechanized throughout: from handling iron ores, coal, and pig iron to the finished steel products;

(3) that, in particular, the German were far more efficient in use of fuels.

ii) In 1971, however, Professor Donald [now Deirdre] McCloskey indirectly challenged Landes: in a now famous paper.5 Indeed McCloskey has been carrying on a crusade to rescue the reputation of British industry in the late Victorian era.

Here are his comparative data for Germany, the U.K, and the U.S. for 1906-13


International Comparisons in Steel Production, 1906-1913


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