Adams class ships design and architecture



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USS CHARLES F. ADAMS DDG-2 FIRSTS AND

SIGNIFICANT EVENTS, AWARDS AND COMMENDATIONS
ADAMS CLASS SHIPS DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE

All ADAMS CLASS ships were designed and engineered by the firm of

GIBBS & COX an independent engineering and design firm specializing

in naval architecture, marine engineering, management support,


USS CHARLES F. ADAMS LAUNCHED SEPT. 8, 1959

USS CHARLES F. ADAMS was launched on Maine's Kennebec River at Bath Iron Works on September 8, 1959 by Mrs. Robert Homans, sister of the namesake. ADAMS was equipped with ASROC, the TARTAR Guided Missile System, six conventional torpedo tubes, and two 5"/54 caliber gun mounts.


SHIP TESTS, EVALUATION - JAN. 1960-JULY 1960

Between Jan. 1960 and Aug. 1960, CHARLES F. ADAMS construction was completed and construction crews conducted intensive ship system evaluations and final outfitting. The ship was in and out of port for testing and sea trials.


SHIP MOVED FROM BATH MAINE - JULY 1960

About July 15 the ship was moved from Bath, Maine to Boston Navy Yard

for loading extensive supplies including beds, furniture, tools, technical and equipment manuals and everything needed to make the ship habitable and

usable as a workspace. The crew was staying in local barracks after moving

from several months at Newport, RI. ADAMS was mostly at the pier being

out fitted by the crew carrying everything onboard and storing it on the ship.

The full crew began boarding and staying on the ship about Sept. 1, 1960.
COMMISSIONED SEPT. 10, 1960

The USS Charles F. Adams DDG-2 was commissioned in Boston, Massachusetts, at Charlestown Shipyard, on September 10, 1960. Her radio net assigned call sign was “STEAMBOAT and her international call sign was “NBJR”. The first CO was CDR. William R. Munroe, Jr. and the Executive Officer was LT.CDR. Jack H. Hilton.



SHIP TESTS AND EVALUATION SEPT 1960-JULY 1961

Between Sept 1960 and July 1961, CHARLES F. ADAMS conducted intensive technical evaluations, final outfitting, sea trials, crew type training, and extensive missile test firing at Roosevelt Roads, PR



FIRST TIME TO CHARLESTON, SC JULY 29, 1961

On June 30, 1961 the ADAMS was officially assigned her home port as Charleston, South Carolina. ADAMS steamed up the Cooper River to her home port in Charleston, SC for the first time on 29, July 1961 and joined Destroyer Squadron SIX (DESRON6).


FIRST DEPLOYMENT NORTHERN EUROPE - DEPART NOV. 13, 1961

Adams began her first overseas deployment as the newest US Navy show ship

on a good will tour to Northern European Countries as a member of Destroyer Squadron SIX. She visited Brest, France; Gothenburg, Sweden; Aarhus, Denmark; Rotterdam, Sweden; Netherlands; Portsmouth, England and Lisbon, Portugal. Adams was the first US Warship since WWII to visit these countries and transit the Kiel Canal to Kiel, Germany.
FIRST TIME ASSIGNED TO SIXTH FLEET – Spring 1962

ADAMS was officially assigned to the Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean on

Jan. 6, 1962 and arrived to the Sixth Fleet in the spring of 62. While in

the Med she performed in many fleet exercises and visited the cities

of La Spezia, San Remo, Genoa, Italy, and Toulon, France, before

returning to Charleston, SC on 3 March 1962.


FIRST CHANGE OF COMMAND –MARCH 10, 1962

The first change of command occurred 10 March 1962 when Plankowner Capt. William. R. Munroe, Jr, USN, was relieved by CDR. Scott E. Terrill, USN.


PRESIDENTIAL REVIEW – APRIL 14, 1962

ADAMS sailed 9 April to rendezvous with other fleet units off Norfolk where

she participated in a Presidential review on 14 April 1962
PROJECT MERCURY PARTICIPATION – OCT. 1962

ADAMS participated in the project Mercury manned space flight recovery operations in Oct 1962. Following CDR. Wally Schirra's six orbital flight on

3 Oct 1962 and successful recovery, ADAMS proceeded to Norfolk to

commence duty as Surface-to-Air TARTAR Missile school ship. This

was a first, both for the ADAMS and the Navy.
S-A-M MISSILE SCHOOL SHIP – OCT. 24, 1962 to DEC. 2, 1962

While engaged in the duties of being the first S-A-M school ship, the Cuban missile crisis broke out on 24 Oct 1962, and ADAMS was assigned to be

actively involved in the quarantine and surveillance operations. Her first

active duty stop in Oct 1962 was the Bay of Pigs and the Cuban Blockade. ADAMS returned to Charleston, on 2 Dec 1962 after the quarantine was

lifted and remained there until the new year.
CHANGE OF COMMAND – APRIL 6, 1963

ADAMS returned to Charleston and had a change of command on 6 April, 1963 when CDR. Scott. E. Terrill, USN was relieved as Commanding Officer by CDR. E. H. Tidd, USN.


FIRST SHIPYARD OVERHAUL – APRIL 16, 1963 to AUG, 16, 1963

ADAMS entered Norfolk Naval Shipyard to commence her first regular shipyard overhaul and the first overhaul of a DDG. ADAMS remained in the shipyard for overhaul until 16 August 1963 when she left to return to Charleston.


SPRINGBOARD 1964 – MID JAN. 1964

ADAMS departed mid Jan. 1964 heading south to participate in the Atlantic

Fleet annual spring training program, SPRINGBOARD 1964. During this operation ADAMS kicked off a new concept of tactical information, “the fast carrier task group”. The concept consisted of three or four missile escorts who operate continuously with an attack carrier, giving the carrier anti-submarine and anti-aircraft protection while the ships operate at high speeds and over long distances. The USS SARATOGA (CVA-60) accompanied by the fast escorts ADAMS (DDG-2), SELLERS (DDG-11) and MACDONOUGH (DLG-8). They were first to practice this new concept and another first for the ADAMS.
CHANGE OF COMMAND – JULY 6, 1964

ADAMS had a change of command 6 July 1964 when CDR. Emmett H. Tidd, USN, was relieved as CO by CDR. Robert R. Monroe, USN.


NATO EXERCISES - SEPT. 8, 1964 to MID OCT. 1964

Adams was underway 8 Sept. 1964 to take part in the large scale NATO exercise designated MASTERSTROKE from 9 to 13 Sept/ followed by exercise TEAMWORK. During this period ADAMS cruised north of the Arctic Circle.

The exercise concept envisioned the safe transit of US elements of Striking Force Atlantic and Canadian / US elements of the Underway Replenishment Force through the Western Atlantic, supported by the Anti-Submarine Force. Submarine opposition was provided by a simulated enemy (Orange) Force comprised of conventional and nuclear submarines. This was another first for ADAMS and established the foundation for the annual exercises later agreed to by NATO and named “STANAVFORLANT” for Stabile Naval Force Atlantic.
ADAMS GAINS ORDER OF THE BLUE NOSE SEPT. 21, 1964

ADAMS and crew joined the “Order of the Blue Nose” when they crossed the Arctic Circle Monday 21 Sept/ 1964 at 02 degrees north and 31 minutes west.


CONGRATULATIONS MESSAGES – OCT 15, 1964

The following message was received Thursday 15 Oct/ from Commander

of our returning Task Group;
“My heartiest congratulations on a well conducted in port visit. Reports of incidents were few and minor. You have accomplished our mission to enhance international relations with NATO and Allied Nations. Well Done” RADM KING
The following messages were received at the conclusion of the NATO Cruise:
“The successful conclusion of exercise MASTERSTROKE and TEAMWORK has reinforced the posture of the striking fleet as a major force in NATO.”  VADM. MASTERSON (COMSTRIKEFLTLANT)
“During the past three weeks there have been numerous contacts with exercise and ‘live’ opposition. . The results of TEAMWORK were most impressive. I am certain there is no other carrier striking force in the NAVY that is equal to ours.” RADM TOWNSEND (CTF 401)
“Your overall performance has been in general outstanding. I was particularly impressed in the small number of material failures and CASREPTS as well as your prompt responses to ever changing situations.”

CAPT. HIPP (COMDESDIV62)


FIRST FULL MED DEPLOYMENT – DEPART NOV. 28, 1964

ADAMS made the first of her full Mediterranean deployments leaving on

Sat. 28 Nov. 1964.
HATS OFF TO ADAMS STOREKEEPERS – JAN 18, 1965

These many long nights spent in processing emergency requirements from other Sixth Fleet ships have not gone without notice. Figures just received from the Sixth Fleet Material Control Officer indicates CHARLES F. ADAMS

made 15 different emergency repair parts available to other ships during Dec. This is the best record of both Task Groups we have operated with in the MED.

In the entire Sixth Fleet, only the GRAND CANYON (AD-28) and the CAMBRIA (APA-36) had better records. WELL DONE


REGAINED TG 60 REPLENTISHMENT TROPHY – FEB 11, 1965

As a result of the most expeditious handling of all phases of the replenishment last Friday, our Task Group (TG 60.2) has regained the trophy from TG 60.1 (FORRESTAL) and her playmates.


LETTERS OF APPRECIATION: FEB 1965

Following are extracts from a recently received letter of appreciation from COMCRUDESLANT (RADM DUNCAN) concerning C. F. ADAMS participation in exercises MASTERPIECE and TEAMWORK.


“Commander SECOND Fleet, noting that the exercise was at sea during the entire period, stated that during this period there were few material casualty reports (CASREPS) in the fleet and none of these seriously affected the

capability of units involved to perform their tasks. The outstanding material readiness of the ships for this exercise and the ability to retain this readiness reflects a high degree of professionalism on the part of all units and

individuals involved.”
Commander in Chief, US Atlantic Fleet, in his endorsement to the above

added, “Even though we are faced with a shortage of men, money and

materials, it is most gratifying to note that the Cruiser/Destroyer Force, US Atlantic Fleet is able to maintain an excellent readiness posture such as

depicted by Commander SECOND Fleet.”


CHANGE OF COMMAND – JAN. 26, 1966

CDR Roy F, HOFFMANN, USN, relieved CDR Robert R. MONROE,

USN, as Commanding Officer,
NATO FAIRGAME IV PILOT PICKUP –MARCH 2, 1966

During the NATO FAIRGAME IV (US/French Bilateral exercise) in March

1966 ADAMS was on station when Lt. Bernard Birot, a French pilot, had

to bail out of his fiery Extendardjet within visual range of the ship. ADAMS lookouts and recovery team performed a prompt and skillful recovery and

within 15 minutes the pilot was brought on board and in a hot shower.
SHIP YARD OVERHAUL

Through determination and hard work of the officers, men and shipyard workers the CHARLES F. ADAMS completed overhaul on schedule, ADAMS was the first combatant ship of the Atlantic Fleet to achieve this objective in over three consecutive years. The overhaul was extensive and expensive. In addition to a $1,960,000 dollar repair package and numerous alterations


SECNAV SPECIAL GUEST CRUISE FEB 24-26, 1967

ADAMS visited Port Everglades, Florida ands on Feb 25 hosted AFL/CIO SECNAV Guest Cruise personnel. CHARLES F. ADAMS was host to the AFL/CIO National Executive Council for a special Secretary of the Navy

guest cruise. Although the seas were rough, the Nations Labor Leaders

were impressed by the weapons demonstrations and thoroughly enjoyed

their day at sea.
REFRESHER TRAINING GUANTANAMO MAR 27–MAY 8

The ship sailed to Guantanamo Cuba arriving 26 March where she

commenced a six week refresher training period The CHARLES F.

ADAMS did well at Guantanamo. She established a three year record

in damage control, which stood until another Destroyer Division 62

ship, the USS SEMMES broke this mark only two months later; and

ADAMS just missed establishing an all time high in all phases of

engineering by scoring an overall 94.6 percent. On her Operational

Readiness Inspection conducted the last day of training, 8 May, the

lowest mark assigned in any phase or division of ship readiness was

a “GOOD with heavy accent on excellents and outstandings.”
NAVAL GUNFIRE EXERCISE FILFLA ROCK, MALTA SEPT. 13

The first big exercise came at Filfla Rock, south of the island of Malta.

Here the CHARLES F. ADAMS conducted Naval Gunfire Support

exercises observed by The Royal Artillery and established a SIXTH

Fleet shore bombardment record. Ironically, the previous high grade

had been recorded by another DESRON62 ship, USS SEMMES.


OPERATION QUICKDRAW – NOV 14

"OPERATION QUICKDRAW, was conducted in the Bay of Taranto.

Fast Patrol Boat units of the Italian Navy simulated Soviet "Komar”

boats in combat with USN units. CHARLES F. ADAMS did well that

night and was credited with destroying four of the enemy units.
CHANGE OF COMMAND MAR 29-APR10

ADAMS was again in Charleston between 29 March and 10 April.

During this short period a Nuclear Technical Proficiency Inspection

was held. On 10 April the ship had a Change of Command. CDR

John L. Jack JONES, USN, relieved Captain R. F. HOFFMANN,

USN, on a dreary rainy day.


ADAMS PERFORMS MISSILE TESTS FOR SECNAV APR 11-19

ADAMS sailed for the Caribbean the next day April 11 with a new

Captain and arrived April 12. During this seven day operating period

ADAMS fired two TARTAR missiles at the Atlantic Fleet Weapons

Range, and provided destroyer services to USS AMERICA (CVA-66)

and participated in an underway demonstration for the Secretary of the

Navy.
ADAMS MISSILE AGAIN HITS TARGET SHIP APR29-MAY3

ADAMS was again underway on 29 April for another Missile Exercise.

Four missiles were fired in a FREE PLAY environment with great success. During this shoot, ADAMS earned acclaim as the only ship in history to

again “hit the target ship” USS KILLEN with a TARTAR missile. Naval

gunfire support at Culebra was also scheduled which the ship completed

with excellent to outstanding scores.


SEARCH FOR THE USS SCORPION (SSN-589) MAY 28-30

ADAMS received an emergency order to deploy with Sub Rescue ships

and get underway very early the morning of 28 May to participate in a

search for the USS SCORPION (SSN-589). The missing sub was overdue returning from the Azores. ADAMS deployed to the "Virginia Straights"

and searched to see if they could pick up any signals. The sea was extremely rough and we never heard or found any trace of the sub. Later the USS Scorpion (SSN-589) was found on the bottom.
SONAR CONTACT LEAVING SANDEJORD JULY 10, 1968

Recalled by Capt. John L. Jack Jones CO ADAMS 1968

About 10, July 1968 after we departed Sanjeford, Norway and as we entered

the North Sea, we acquired a very strong sonar contact which was very close. Prior to departing we had reports about a Russian sub in the area. We felt a

small bump as we moved slowly out to sea and ultimately lost contact and proceeded to our next port Rota, Spain. Shortly after losing the sonar

contact we experienced an unusual vibration on our port side at speeds above

15 knots. I stopped the ship and dove over the side to inspect the screws. I

found two of our four blades on the port screw were severely curled which

was causing the port side vibration. I locked the shaft and proceeded on the starboard screw. When we reached Naples, Italy we had a new port screw installed by the Shenandoah without having to go into drydock. My

evaluation was that I hit the conning tower of a Russian submarine.


ADAMS CREWMAN DIES IN SHIP ACCIDENT - JULY 29, 1968

Tragedy struck the USS Charles F. Adams while in port in Naples, Italy.

Adams crew members were performing a routine procedure known as a

"bottom blow". During the process a 1,200 lb. P.S.I. steam line ruptured

and BT3 Terrence Manganello was killed instantly. At 0030, 29 July,

while lighting off a boiler prior to getting underway a steam line ruptured,

killing BT3 Terence MANGAENELLO. Repairs and replacement of

piping an all four boilers of the engineering plant extended the ships

stay until 16 August.
SIXTH FLEET OPERATIONS SEP 25 - 30

ANCHOR ARGOSTOLI BAY GREECE OCT 1-2

SIXTH FLEET OPERATIONS OCT 3-5

ANCHOR ARGOSTOLI BAY GREECE OCT 6-8

SIXTH FLEET operations took up the time from 25 Sept. to 6 Oct. The

ship anchored twice in Argostoli Bay, Greece, once for a Fleet Commander Conference, and the second time for training, It was during the second

Argostoli anchorage that COMDESDIV SIX TWO, Commodore W. F.

REGAN, presented the ship with the CCMCRUDESUT BATTLE

EFFICIENCY "E”, for fiscal year 1968 culminating a years hard work.


ADAMS INVOLVED IN UNREP INCIDENT – SUMMER 1969

During summer of 1969 ADAMS was alongside the USS Elkomin AO-55

in the Caribbean taking on fuel when they got too close and did some minor structure damage to both ships.
ADAMS CREW GIVES MORE TO NAVY RELIEF – JUNE 13, 1969

June 13, 1969, ADAMS was sited in the Bow Hook paper and made history again by being the ship who gave more to Navy Relief per man than any other navy ship. The crew used the ships number to attain a goal and raised $2,222.22. With 100% of the crew participating they donated $6.98 per man.


HOMEPORT MOVE CHARLESTON, SC TO MAYPORT, FL JULY 1969

CHARLES F. ADAMS left her homeport of eight years, Charleston, S.C. and moved to her new home, Mayport, Florida under leadership of CDR John L.

Jack Jones, CO and became part of Destroyer Squadron EIGHT (DESRON8).
GREEK FREIGHTER SIDESWIPES SHIPS - FEB 10, 1970

While in Naples, Italy harbor 10 Feb. 1970 a Greek freighter sideswiped four ships. USS SEMMES DDG 18 was heavily damaged and USS SAMUEL B. ROBERTS DD 823, USS CHARLES F. ADAMS DDG-2 and USS YELLOWSTONE AD 27 were slightly damaged.


STANAVFORLANT 1972

Early 1972, ADAMS served as a member of the Standing Naval Forces Atlantic, STANAVFORLANT, where she operated with ships from Canada, Great Britain, the Federal Republic of Germany, Portugal, The Netherlands and Turkey. ADAMS North Atlantic and Mediterranean deployment was to participate in the NATO Standing Naval Force exercises until June 6.


ADAMS ENGINEERING PLANT CONVERTED OCT 1972

ADAMS returned to Mayport late August and DURING Sept and Oct 1972

was pier side while the engineering plant was converted for the use of Navy Distillate fuel.
ADAMS DESRON14 – SPRINGBOARD JAN 10, 1973

ADAMS was assigned Destroyer Squadron FOURTEEN (DESRON14) beginning 1973. On 10 Jan 1973 Adams was underway for three weeks 

operation SPRINGBOARD in the Caribbean. Included were naval gunfire

support exercises, missile firings, and anti-submarine tracking. While

returning from Operation SPRINGBOARD, ADAMS passed an early

morning Operational Readiness Inspection (ORI) for which she received

the squadron Battle Efficiency “E”.
ADAMS DEPENDENTS CRUISE – JUNE 1973

June 1973 ADAMS held a dependents cruise for a day from Mayport

before the ship left for the Indian Ocean and Middle East cruise.
ADAMS RECEIVES MERITORIOUS UNIT COMMENDATION

The ship received the following award after the mid east cruise.


MERITORIOUS UNIT COMMENDATION to USS CHARLES F.

ADAMS (DDG-2)


From: CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS
The Secretary of the Navy takes pleasure in presenting the MERITORIOUS UNIT COMMENDATION to USS CHARLES F. ADAMS (DDG-2) for

service as set forth in the following CITATION:


For meritorious service while conducting special operations for Commander Middle East Force in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden from 15 October to 15 November 1973. During this period of high intra theater tension, USS CHARLES F. ADAMS contributed significantly to the success of maintaining a visible and effective United States presence in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden.
While skillfully and efficiently performing the various tasks assigned, the officers and men of USS CHARLES F. ADAMS maintained their ship in a completely operational and combat ready status. Their determined and inspiring efforts reflected credit upon themselves and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
For the Secretary of the United States Navy
Signed. E. L. Zumwalt, Jr.

Admiral United States naavy

Chief of Naval Operations

TEST PLATFORM FOR GUNNERY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM - 1976

ADAMS deployed in 1976 as a test platform for the Gunnery Improvement Program. The ship went to Puerto Rico for gunnery practice about end of Sept and beginning October 76. The ship did well and got a Battle "E" there.


HOMEPORT CHANGE FOR OVERHAUL – JAN 75 TO JAN 76

Adams changed homeport to Philadelphia, PA as she went in the shipyard for the entire year. During this regular overhaul period at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard ADAMS was equipped to conduct twin drop-zone helicopter flight operations and gained a new MK42 MOD 10 5"/54 gun system, a new gunfire control system including a forward looking infra-red sensor, a laser ranging unit, and an AN/SPS-39A height finding radar. 


ADAM RECEIVES LETTER OF COMENDTION – SEPT. 1977
The Commander Naval Surface Force, U. S. Atlantic Fleet

takes pleasure in commending U S CHARLES F. ADAMS (DDG 2)

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:
"During the fiscal year ending 30 September 1977, USS CHARLES F.

ADAMS (DDG 2) attained the highest degree of Battle Readiness in Destroyer

Squadron Fourteen and was selected to receive the Battle Efficiency "E"

Award and the Engineering Department Award. This distinction was achieved

through a high degree of teamwork and professionalism.
The outstanding performance of duty by the officers and men in U S CHARLES F. ADAMS is in keeping with the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service."
Signed: W. L. READ

Vice Admiral, U. S. Navy

Commander Naval Surface Force, U. S. Atlantic Fleet

ADAMS HITS PERFECT SCORE JUNE 16, 1978

An article about ADAMS in the Mayport Mirror June 16, 1978 said the following:

USS Charles F. Adams DDG-2 obtained a perfect score in a dramatic surface-to-surface missile firing exercise in mid May off the island of Crete. The target was a remote controlled SEPTAR boat, which closed the ship at speeds above 30 knots. Within seconds of reporting the incoming boat, which simulated a hostile missile craft, ADAMS was given clearance to engage with standard missiles. After a brief countdown for range telemetry purposes, the ship fired an instrumented standard missile at the incoming boat. Seconds later, at a range of over 10 miles, the standard missile plunged vertically through the SEPTAR, exploding the boat in a fiery blast. The wreckage of the boat floated and burned for a few minutes before sinking into the Sea of Crete. C. F. ADAMS has been deployed to the Sixth Fleet since April 4, and is a unit of Destroyer Squadron TWELVE.
ADAMS RECEIVES LETTER OF ACCOMADATION – SEPT.1978
The Commander Naval Surface Force, U. S. Atlantic Fleet

takes pleasure in commending USS CHARLES F. ADAMS (DDG 2)

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:
"During the fiscal year ending 30 September 1978, USS CHARLES F.

ADAMS (DDG 2) attained the highest degree of Battle Readiness in her

competitive class in Destroyer Squadron Twelve and was selected to receive

the Battle Efficiency "E" Award and Departmental Awards in Combat Information

Center, Communications, Surfaceto-Air Missile Systems, Engineering,

Antisubmarine Weapons and Operations, and Electronic Warfare. This

distinction was achieved through a high degree of teamwork and

professionalism.


The outstanding performance of duty by the officers and men in

USS CHARLES F. ADAMS is in keeping with the finest traditions of the

United States Naval Service."
Signed: W. L. READ

Vice Admiral, U. S. Navy

Commander Naval Surface Force, U. S. Atlantic Fleet

ADAMS CO HITS WHARF NOV 1978

In Sfax, Tunisia ADAMS managed to run into the wharf. The Captain wanted to pull out sans tugs in a fairly constricted basin and it did not work out. No real damage except to egos. Adams returned to home port Nov 1978.


PHILADELPHIA YARD OVERHAUL - DEC 1979 to FEB 1980

After making Mediterranean deployments in 1977 and 1978, CHARLES F. ADAMS once again entered the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard where more changes were made on the weapons systems, including the addition of the new twin-dome PAIR sonar system and HAR­POON surface-to-surface missile capabilities. ADAMS again entered the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard in Dec 78 until Feb 1980 where more changes were made on the weapons systems.

Crewmates remembered we picked up Harpoon capability for the missile launcher but mostly it was just an overhaul of the existing equipment. They totally removed all of the fire control electronics and refurbished the boards, changed gun barrels, tore down, cleaned and rebuilt the engines and boilers, removed all of the asbestos but no real new capabilities except the missile launcher. The mess deck floor was raised by two inches with insulation to keep the heat from the engine room below it from heating up the mess decks. We all knew they were doing it but remembering to duck two extra inches was not always accomplished by the tall people.
ADAMS LOSES CREWMAN DURING SEA TRIALS – JAN 1980

During the first sea trials Jan 1980 they lost a guy over the side and never found him. Two mess attendants were sent to Site TV to get the movie for the wardroom and were walking along the main deck starboard side. Site TV was on the 01 level starboard side of the aft superstructure. The seas were rough, the water very cold and the main deck was secured but extra lifelines had not been put out. Announcements were made over 1MCthat the main deck was secured due to rough seas. The two made it to the aft ladder to the 01 level and were on their way up (seconds from safety) when a wave hit them while on the ladder. One managed to hold on but the new kid was washed over the side. The other guy went to the nearest phone and reported the man overboard to the bridge after coming around and searching they never found him. 


REFRESHER TRAINING – FEB to NOV. 1980

Adams went through Refresher training in Guantanamo Bay Cuba and

returned for Operations in the Caribbean twice. As a test platform of the new MK68 GFCS the Adams shot 568 5" rounds out of Mt51 and Mt52. Scoring

a perfect score on the 2 graded exercises.


CREW AWARDED NAVY EXPEDITIONARY MEDAL

During the Indian Ocean Deployment we visited Port Louis, Mauritius. The

entire crew was awarded the Navy Expeditionary Medal for participation in events related to the Iran Hostage Crisis and for protecting oil shipments through

the Straights of Hormuz.  We spent a lot of time at Gonzo Station, and on several occasions, shadowed Russian surveillance ships. On the way back, we transited the Suez Canal and got orders to wait off the coast of Lebanon for a week or

two due to hostilities.
Taken from The Bahamas Guide - a Vacation and Business Guide

The HMBS Flamingo Incident – May 10, 1980
Tuesday, May 10, 2005- Remember the HMBS Flamingo

Today is the 25th anniversary of the sinking of the HMBS Flamingo which was unjustly attacked by Cuban MIGS off the Ragged Island chain in 1980. The Commander of the boat was Amos Rolle. Four Bahamian marines -- Fenrick Sturrup, Austin Smith, David Tucker and Edward Williams -- lost their lives in service to their country.


Larry Smith recounts the tragedy in the yesterday's Tribune:

Today, most Bahamians know little about the incident, which traumatized the country for months. In fact, the anniversary of this event, which the Castro government described as “a regrettable confusion", passed almost unnoticed.


Cuba agreed to pay $10 million in reparations for the sinking of HMBS Flamingo and the murder of the four marines - Fenrick Sturrup, Austin Smith, David Tucker and Edward Williams. And the eight Cuban fishermen who started it all were convicted of poaching in July, 1980.
On Saturday, May 10, 1980 the Flamingo was on routine patrol in the Ragged Island area when it spotted a pair of Cuban fishing boats off deserted Cay Santo Domingo, a Bahamian atoll just 35 miles from the Cuban coast.
As the Flamingo approached, the Cubans fled - until warning shots were fired. Eventually, marines boarded both boats and found 3,000 pounds of fish, lobster, conch and stone crab. The vessels were taken in tow to the nearest cay for a more thorough search.
But on the way, two Cuban MIG jet fighters appeared overhead and began strafing the Flamingo, which was soon rocked by explosions. According to Commander Amos Rolle, "I went to the radio room but there was no power. Water was already ankle deep, so I ordered my men to abandon ship."
All except four of the 19 crewmen made it to one of the fishing boats, with the Cuban jets strafing the area even as the Flamingo was going down. Despite a search by Bahamian and American rescue teams, the four marines were never found.
Commander Rolle, his crew, and eight Cuban fishermen arrived at Duncan Town on Ragged Island about five hours later, but were unable to contact Nassau until early Sunday morning. Soon, more Cuban jets appeared, as well as a military transport and a helicopter -- which actually landed briefly next to the fishing boats. It seemed that an actual invasion was underway to retrieve the poachers.
While the jets buzzed Duncan Town, sending the inhabitants scurrying for cover, a hastily chartered DC-3 arrived from Nassau carrying Defence Force chief Bill Swinley and Police Commissioner Salathial Thompson. Had Cuban troops landed, they could have captured the entire Bahamian high command.
Although the MIG fighters soon withdrew, the Cuban transport and helicopter stayed on the scene for another two hours, preventing evacuation of the Flamingo's crew. And on Monday afternoon, other Cuban military aircraft were spotted over Ragged Island by Defence Force personnel.
But reaction in Nassau was less than swift...

The article goes on to recount the confusion and disbelief that prevailed amongst Bahamians, along with the various "posturing" by political parties, and then continues... On Monday, at the request of the Bahamian government, the US Coast Guard dispatched a rescue helicopter from Puerto Rico to help the Defence Force search for the missing marines around Cay Santo Domingo. A US Navy destroyer (the USS Charles F. Adams DDG-2) was also on the scene, and there were also reports that a British frigate was in the area. As the Coast Guard helicopter began its search, it was buzzed by two Cuban MIGs.


The Miami Herald reported that the US had dispatched two Marine Corps Phantom jets to the scene on Monday after the Coast Guard helicopter was harassed. But a Pentagon spokesmen said the MIGs had left the area by the time the US fighters arrived.
[...] The Cubans first said the attack was a mistake. But that was soon replaced by a face-saving formula which accused The Bahamas of working for the US Central Intelligence Agency. Prime Minister Pindling retorted that the CIA couldn't be behind a Bahamian patrol ship on a routine patrol of Bahamian waters.
[...] Miami Herald reporter Don Bohning wrote that the Flamingo affair had unraveled what Castro had taken decades to achieve -- "third world leadership and respectability".
[...] eventually the Cubans admitted that their planes had attacked "without authorization".
[...] The Cubans eventually accepted full responsibility for the attack and paid compensation to the families of the dead marines.
posted by Newswire at 9:26 AM

Comment: Anonymous who was on the USS Charles F. Adams said:

I was on board the USS Charles F Adams DDG-2 when we were the destroyer searching for survivors along with the Coast Guard helicopter, that night. The two MIGs buzzed the helicopter and the captain vectored the helicopter 100 feet above us. The MIGs were coming in for the kill and the captain "Lit em up" with our fire control illuminators. We came really close to splashing two MIGs that night!
April 30, 2010 from the.deuce.is.loose@hotmail.com

From a crew member who was aboard at the time.

When the USS Charles F. Adams left Guantanamo, Cuba and came across the happenings of the HMBS Flamingo. On this 30th Anniversary of HMBS Flamingo Incident I remember our ship was close enough and searched for missing crewman that night. We pulled out of Gitmo on Friday and our breakout song was Jimmy Buffett's "Changes in Latitude, Changes in Attitude". Guess because we were there the Cuban's didn't land on Ragged Island.
ADAMS FIRST MAJOR DEPLOYMENT IN TWO YEARS

INDIAN OCEAN DEPLOYMENT – DEPART NOV. 19, 1980

CHARLES F. ADAMS left Mayport, FL with Captain Joe McCarton CO in

route to join with the USS Independence deployed to the Indian Ocean. This

was the ADAMS first major deployment in two years.


SHELLBACK INITIATION – NOV 29, 1980

Adams held the first Shellback initiation sailing south in the Atlantic towards the Cape of Good Hope. After navigating the Cape of Good Hope the Battle Group arrived on Gonzo Station Northern Indian Ocean.


ADAMS JOINS SEVENTH FLEET - DEC 17, 1980

ADAMS joined and came under control of the SEVENTH Fleet for Indian

Ocean operations with the USS INDEPENDENCE CV-62 Battle Group.

During the 204 day Indian Ocean deployment CHARLES F. ADAMS

steamed over 65,000 miles, crossed the Equator eight times, transited the

Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal and visited Banbury, Australia, the

farthest east CHARLES F. ADAMS had ever sailed in her twenty year

career. The ship was away from home port 202 days, with 182 days at sea and 20 days in port. She steamed over 65,000 miles and was underway 90.2% of the time.



LETTER OF COMMENDATION MARCH 1982
The Commander Naval Surface Force, U. S. Atlantic Fleet

takes pleasure in commending USS CHARLES F. ADAMS (DDG 2)

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:
"During the competitive cycle ending 31 March 1982, USS CHARLES F.

ADAMS (DDG 2) was selected to receive Departmental Awards in Combat

Information Center, Communications, Gunnery Systems, Surface-to-Air

Missile Systems, Supply, and Electronic Warfare.


The distinction was achieved through a high degree of teamwork and professionalism. The outstanding performance of duty by the Officero and

men in USS CHARLES F. ADAMS is in keeping with the finest traditions

of the United States Naval Service. "
Signed: J. D. Johnson

Vice Admiral US Navy

Commander Naval Surface Force, U. S. Atlantic Fleet

PHILADELPHIA YARD REGULAR OVERHAUL – BEGIN DEC 1982

Upon return, CHARLES F. ADAMS once again entered Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for regular overhaul. During this overhaul, CHARLES F. ADAMS received the SLQ-32, a chaff deployment system, and a major revamping of shipboard air conditioning systems. Addi­tionally, major structural work was accomplished along with other alterations to ensure reliable and effective op­erations during the next operating period.


CHANGE OF COMMAND – AUG. 20 1983

Robert J, Branco, CAPT. USN became Commanding Officer.


PHILADELPHIA YARD OVERHAUL COMPLETED FEB 1, 1984

Feb. 1, 1984, CHARLES F. ADAMS complet­ed overhaul and returned to Mayport, FL. The extent of changes made during the yard period included:

An upgrade to the laser attached on the tubular rangefinder optics that stuck out

of each side of the gun director. It looked like a set of headlights one on top the other. Other digital upgrades were to the AN/SPG-53F Radar. Range to the target used to be calculated using all tubes. Then they came up with a unit called RSPE or Radar Signal Processing Equipment. This was a cabinet of sliding drawers that figured out range to the target using resistors, capacitors, and transistors. State of the art for that time. Then came the digital upgrade for the radar. They got rid of RSPE and the upper (on/off control) and lower right (range computer) side drawers on the radar. The upper one was replaced with a TSG or target signal generator that also controlled the condition of the radar on/off/standby/radiate. This TSG when in test mode would generate a false target for testing the radar and for training. We could generate a target and make the director, computer, and guns follow it. It could be an air or surface target. The bottom drawer was the digital range computer upgrade. This took the place of the RSPE and the tubes in that drawer. It was a stack of printed circuit boards using newly developed micro chips. It was basically a range computer. Its operation was a fixed program so there were no key boards. It was all programmed into the design of the boards so there was no software. This is the only digital upgrade to the system unless they found a way to replace the analog computer on other ships after 1986.


CREW COMMENTS Feb 3, 1984

We left the shipyard in Feb 84 and spent a month in Mayport, before getting underway to do our first Port Visit: Key West, FL. In April, we did an NGFS refresher in Virginia. We dropped anchor off Bloodsworth Island in the Chesapeake Bay, and upon weighing anchor, it got fouled on a submerged

anchor chain left by another vessel. We spent a few hours trying to get

unfouled and got free when we sent our SAR swimmer, BM3 Hitchcock to

tie a mooring line (belayed on our capstan) to the chain, then we lowered

our anchor and got free.


QUALIFICATIONS and MISSILE SHOOT - MAY/JUN 1984,

Our NGFS quals, ASW AUTEC quals, and CSSQT/Missile shoot was all

done in May and June 1984. We had a clean sweep, and did particularly

well in NGFS. We visited St. Croix and St. Thomas, USVI, and Roosevelt

Roads, PR.
CITATION FOR OPERATION STOVEPIPE MAR/APR 1984
COMMANDING OFFICER

US NAVAL COMMUNICATION AREA MASTER STATION MEDITERRANEAN

FPO NEW YORK 09554-7000
Takes great pleasure in presenting to USS CHARLES F. ADAMS (DDG-2)

The SMALLPIPE SUPERSTAR

as set forth in the following citation:
DURING THE PERIOD FROM 30 MARCH TO 02 APRIL 1984 DURING

EXERCISE SMALLPIPE CONDUCTED IN THE MEDITERRANEAN

COMMUNICATIONS AREA, THE COMMUNICATORS OF THE USS CHARLES F. ADAMS DEMONSTRATED SUPERB EXCELLENT PROFESSIONAL EXPERTISE IN MAINTAINING THE HIGH FREQUENCY MMUL AND A HIGH FREQUENCY TERMINATION WITH NAVCOMMSTA ROTA SPAIN.

SPECIFICALLY YOU EARNED THE HIGHEST OVERALL GRADE WITH A BROADCAST SCREEN REQUEST (BSR) OF 3 PER CENT WITH A TOTAL OF 2519 TOTAL MESSAGES. ZERO OPERATIONAL MESSAGES SENT BY SATELLITE CIRCUITRY AND A 99 PER CENT AVERAGE TERMINATION RELIABILITY. YOUR ATTENTION TO DETAIL, PERSISTANCE TO RESOLVE DIFFICULTIES, WAS A MAJOR CONTRIBUTION TOWARD EFFECTIVE HIGH FREQUENCY READINESS ASHORE AND AFLOAT.


I EXTEND MY PERSONAL APPRECIATION FOR A JOB WELL DONE.
Signed P. N. BONTROP, JR.

CAPTAIN US NAVY


ACCIDENT TAKES 3 CREWMEN - OCT. 1984

ADAMS lost 3 young sailors in a car accident while in Mayport.


ADAMS RECEIVES COMENDATION MARCH 1985
The Commander, Naval Surface Force, U. S. Atlantic Fleet

takes pleasure in commending USS CHARLES F. ADAMS (DDG 2)

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:
"During the competitive cycle ending 31 March 1985, USS CHARLES F.

ADAMS (DDG 2) was selected to receive Awards for Excellence in Main

Propulsion; Command, Control, and Communications; Anti-Surface Warfare;

and Electronic Warfare. This distinction was achieved through a high degree

of teamwork and professionalism.
The outstanding performance of duty by the officers and men of USS

CHARLES F. ADAMS (DDG 2) is in keeping with the finest traditions

of the United States Naval Service."
Signed: W. F. MCCAULEY

Vice Admiral, U. S. Navy

Commander, Naval Surface Force, U. S. Atlantic Fleet

MIDDLE EAST CRUISE 4 FEB 4, 1985 – AUG. 5 1985

Middle East Force 2-85 (Persian Gulf)

After completing pre deployment build-up, CHARLES F. ADAMS departed for her second Middle East deployment, on 4 February 1985. During this deployment, spent mostly in the Persian Gulf, the ship was underway over 85% of the time and steamed 35,000 nautical miles and visited Palma de Mallorca, Spain, Lisbon, Portugal, (July 20-24) Karachi, Pakistan, Bahrain, Al Jubayl and Jeddah, in Saudi Arabia and Djibouti.


CHANGE OF COMMAND – OCT 1985

Dave Watson relieved CAPT Branco as CO.


TRAINING AND INSPECTIONS APRIL – SEPT. 1986

From April through September 1986, CHARLES F. ADAMS underwent training and various inspections including the ship's command inspection, preventive maintenance system inspection, supply management inspection and nuclear technical proficiency inspection. During that time, she conducted naval gunfire support missions off Vieques Island, PR and at Bloodsworth Island. After all inspections and qualifications were completed, she was awarded the Battle Efficiency "E".


The Commander, Naval Surface Force, U. S. Atlantic Fleet

takes pleasure in commending USS CHARLES F. ADAMS (DDG 2)

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:
"DURING THE COMPETITIVE CYCLE ENDING 30 SEPTEMBER 1986,

USS CHARLES F. ADAMS (DDG 2) ATTAINED THE HIGHEST DEGREE OF BATTLE READINESS IN COMDESRON 12 AND WAS SELECTED TO RECEIVE THE BATTLE EFFICIENCY "E" AWARD AND AWARDS FOR EXCELLENCE IN MAIN PROPULSION; COMMAND, CONTROL, AND COMMUNICATIONS; ANTI-AIR WARFARE; ANTI-SURFACE WARFARE; DAMAGE CONTROL; NAVIGATION AND DECK SEAMANSHIP; AND ELECTRONIC WARFARE.


THIS ACHIEVEMENT REFLECTS A HIGH LEVEL OF TEAMWORK AND

PROFESSIONALISM. THE OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE OF DUTY

BY THE OFFICERS AND MEN OF USS CHARLES F. ADAMS (DDG 2) IS IN KEEPING WITH THE FINEST TRADITIONS OF THE UNITED STATES

NAVAL SERVICE."


Signed: W. F. MCAULEY

Vice Admiral, U. S. Navy

Commander, Naval Surface Force, U. S. Atlantic Fleet

CONGRATULATIONS MEMOS

FROM COMSIXTHFLT: As you head for home after a demanding SIXTHFLT Deployment, you have my thanks and appreciation for the tremendous support you have provided. Your professional performance - from excellent port visits, and V.I.P. embarkations, to Steller opera­tions during National and allied exercises - has been the source of pride for me. You have contrib­uted greatly to the sustained readiness of the SIXTHFLEET to support Naval objectives. Congratu­lations and well done for a superbly executed deployment.


FROM CTGTWO FOUR: As you depart to continue your journey home, I want you, your offi­cers and crew to know that your performance throughout the deployment to the Mediterranean proved you to be a SUPERSTAR. Your accomplishments were many, including the highly visible mission as Eagle Control in the Aegean during Dragon Hammer and your extensive duties as mis­sile escort for CTF 61 during the Eastern Med contingency operations. It was noted with distinct pleasure that CHARLES F. ADAMS knows how to shoot her missiles - first time, every time. Your crew distinguished itself during your highly successful port visits. Your most recent success in the OPPE was in itself impressive and exemplifies the obvious pride and determination of your crew. CHARLES F. ADAMS is the oldest member of our Battle Group, but there isn't anyone I would rather have in company.
FROM COMNAVSURFLANT: Congratulations and welcome home. You have done an out­standing job across the board of representing our Nation's interests. Your superb performance during exercise Dragon Hammer, high state of readiness throughout the deployment, and exem­plary conduct ashore are noted with great professional pride. Your unselfish dedication and sepa­ration from your loved ones are sincerely appreciated by this great country of ours. Well done and best wishes for a well deserved homecoming. I'm mighty proud of you.
FROM COMDESRON THREE SIX: With Med 1-87 drawing to a close, I want each "CHUCKEY DEUCE" team member to know that I count it among the highest of privileges to have served with you and your top of the line crew during the past six months. I commend you all. Your opera­tional performance has been superb and your name synonymous with success. Of particular note were your operational roles as Eagle Control during Dragon Hammer and the superior efficiency with which you conducted your missile shoot in National Week. The successful completion of your OPPE and your exceptional representation as the country's and Navy's ambassador abroad serve only to highlight the versatility which allows you to claim "FIRST IN CLASS, SECOND TO NONE." You've proven to be a superb member of the "TOP OF THE LINE" Squadron.
FROM COMDESRON TWELVE: It gives me great personal and professional pride to add my BRAVO ZULU on the occasion of your return from the Med. Your superb performances has been a tribute to the dedication and professionalism of your entire crew.
FROM COMCRUDESGRU TWELVE: As you complete a highly successful deployment, I com­mend all hands for your superior performance. Reports reaching me indicate that all of you have carried out your duties with a professional poise and sparkle that is only demonstrated by the best.
FROM CINCLANTFLT: I have heard nothing but praise regarding your superb performance during operations with SIXTHFLT in the Med. As you head for home, you can feel justifiably proud of your many accomplishments. Your personal sacrifices have not gone unnoticed, and you should feel confident that you have the heartfelt thanks of a grateful Nation.


ADAMS EARNS BATTLE EFFICIENCY “E” - MARCH 1988

LETTER OF COMMENDATION


The Commander, Naval S u r f a c e Force, U. S. A t l a n t i c F l e e t

takes pleasure in commending

USS CHARLES F. ADAMS (DDG 2)

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:


"DURING THE COMPETITIVE CYCLE ENDING 31 MARCH 1988, USS CHARLES F. ADAMS (OD6 2) ATTAINED THE HIGHEST DEGREE OF BATTLE READINESS IN COMDESRON 12 AND WAS SELECTED TO RECEIVE THE BATTLE EFFICIENCY "E” AWARD AND AWARDS FOR EXCELLENCE IN MAIN PROPULSION; NAVIGATION AND

DECK SEAMANSHIP; DAMAGE CONTROL; COMMAND, CONTROL, AND COMMUNICATIONS; ANTI-AIR WARFARE; ANTI-SURFACE SHIP WARFARE; ANTI-SUBMARINE WARFARE; ELECTRONIC WARFARE; AND SUPPLY. THIS ACHIEVEMENT REFLECTS A HIGH LEVEL OF TEAMWORK AND PROFESSIONALISM.


THE OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE OF DUTY BY THE OFFICERS AND MEN OF USS CHARLES F. ADAMS (DDG 2) IS IN KEEPING WITH THE FINEST TRADITIONS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVAL SERVICE."
Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet
Signed: J. S. Donnell III

Vice Admiral U. S. Navy




CITY OF ATLANTIC BEACH FLORIDA RESULUTION JUNE26, 1989
CITY OF ATLANTIC BACH FLORIDA

Resolution

NO. 89-35
WHEREAS the guided missile destroyer CHARLES F. ADAMS (DDG 2)

is the lead ship in her class and one of three ships in that class homeported at Naval Station Mayport; and


WHEREAS USS CHARLES F. ADAMS (DDG 2) returns to her home port

on June 30, 1989 after a six month deployment to the Mediterranean Sea with United States SIXTH Fleet; and


WHEREAS this is the fourteenth overseas deployment completed by USS CHARLES F. ADAMS (DDG 2); and
WHEREAS the Department of Defense has announced USS CHARLES F. ADAMS (DDG 2) will be decommissioned during fiscal year 1990 and therefore, is unlikely to deploy again; and
WHEREAS the ship and her crew of about 320 officers and men brought great credit to themselves during exercises, operations and port visits throughout this deployment.
NOW, THERFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the City of Atlantic Beach

recognizes the many contributions USS CHARLES F. ADAMS (DDG 2)

has made during this deployment and throughout her distinguished career,

and encourage all citizens to join in welcoming home the ship and her crew.


Introduced and adopted by the City Commission this 26th day of June, 1989.
Signed: William I. Gulliford / Mayor Presiding Officer

Attest: Signed: Maureen King City Clerk



USS CHARLES F. ADAMS DECOMMISIONED – JAN -AUG 1, 1990

The crew readied the ship for decommissioning between Jan 1990 and

culminated in the decommissioning ceremony held at Mayport Florida
AFTER AUG 1, 1990

First in her class of guided missile destroyers, and “Second To None,” CHARLES F. ADAMS was assigned as a unit of Destroyer Squadron TWELVE, immediately prior to decommissioning. The USS Charles F. Adams was decommissioned August 1, 1990 from her homeport of Mayport, FL. She was transferred to Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility (NISMF) Philadelphia, PA. and retired to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard to await final disposition.


From late August 1990 until mid 1997 ex-ADAMS was maintained as an inactive ship by Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility (NISMF) Philadelphia, PA. Prior to 1997, several groups worked to save the ADAMS and in January 1997 the Saginaw Valley Naval Ship Museum Committee (SVNSM) was founded

and began efforts to have the Charlie Deuce go to Bay City, Michigan, to serve as a living museum. NAVSEA, the administrative arm of the Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility (NISMF) Philadelphia, PA., placed the ex-USS Charles F. Adams on “DONATION HOLD” status initially on 20 November 1992 and reconfirmed this again in January 1998 subsequent to notification by SVNSM until funds and documents could be filed with NAVSEA to plan for ADAMS to become a museum ship in Bay City, Michigan. In October 2003 the SVNSM group changed direction and decided it was too expensive to attain the Adams

and quit efforts for the ADAMS and decided to try for the ex-USS EDSON

DD-946 or USS Forrest Sherman DD-931 if available.


In January 2004 the Charles F. Adams Veterans Association (CFAVA) was founded by several Adams Class DDG sailors to save a DDG ship. At that time several Adams Class DDG ships were still sitting at NISMF in Philadelphia.
During the next few years NISMF disposed of at least 3 Adams Class DDG ships with salvagers.
The CFAVA group changed the name to the “Adams Class Veterans Association, Inc.” (ACVA, Inc.), in 2005 and began efforts to save the ex-USS Charles F. Adams DDG-2 and find a city to be the display location for the ship as a museum.
In 2006 ACVA submitted an initial application to NAVSEA to get the ship. This was updated several times between 2007 to 2010. In August 2008 NAVSEA had the exterior of the DDG-2 painted from the main deck to the waterline to make it look better. In 2008 the ACVA started a Jacksonville contingent which was named the Jacksonville Historical Naval Ship Association, Inc. (JHNSA, Inc.) This organization began planning the Jacksonville events needed to perform fundraising and involve the local community and handle public relations. Eventually this group will handle the planning and maintenance of ship functions when it is taken to Jacksonville. The JHNSA has continued work efforts and gained Jacksonville City Council approval for the site requested next to the Acosta Bridge in downtown Jacksonville. Fundraising has begun and events scheduled and monthly updates are sent to NISMF at Philadelphia.

ADAMS ORDER OF DISPOSAL JAN. 25, 1993
DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY

OFFICER IN CHARGE

NAVAL SEA SYSTEMS COMMAND DETACHMENT

NAVY INACTIVE FLEET

BLDG. 8Y. ST. JULlENS CREEK ANNEX

PORTSMOUTH. VIRGINIA 23702-5002
4770

01C:DDG:clg

Ser 065

25 Jan 93


From: Officer in Charge, Naval Sea Systems Command Detachment, Navy Inactive Fleet, Portsmouth, VA 23702-5002

To: Distribution List


Subj: DISPOSAL OF EX-CHARLES F ADAMS (DDG-2)
Ref: (a) NAVSEA DET PORTSMOUTH VA ltr 4770 Ser 867 of 17 Dec 92

(b) NAVSEA DET NISMF PHILADELPHIA PA Fax of 21 Jan 93

1. Make the following changes t o action dates of paragraph 4. Schedule of Reference (a) as requested reference (b).

a. RADSAFE: Not l a t e r than: Completed.

e. Remove curator i tems not 1 ater than: 26 February 1993.

g. Systems Commands and Inventory Managers stripping period:

27 February 1993 through 30 April 1993.

h. Fleet and Type Commander stripping period: 01 May 1993 through 31 May 1993.


i. Other government agencies stripping period: 01 June 1993 through

30 June 1993.

j. Recovery of precious metals: 01 July 1993 through 31 July 1993.

k. Declassification/Demil : Not l a t e r than: 31 July 1993.

1. Conduct post-stripping asbestos inspection not later than: 31 August 1993.

m. Scheduled final walk-through as required reference (c) and in

accordance with reference (d): 15 September 1993.

n. Custodian: Upon certification by Officer in Charge, NAVSEA DET

Portsmouth, VA, or his designated representative that no material of known or anticipated value t o U.S. Navy, or other material that represents a waste of government resources remains aboard, report ship available for catalogi ng and sale to DRMS (NSO) Memphis, TN, not later than 30 September 1993.

Signed: D. D. GILLIKIN

By direction
Distribution:

NAVSEADETPORTSVAINST 5216.1 SERIES LIST I I I

CNO WASHINGTON DC (N090, N431, N31/52, N8, N86)

COMNAVSEASYSCOM WASHINGTON DC (PMS 300, SEA 91, SEA 09TlC)

NAVSEA DET NISMF PHILADELPHIA PA

DRMS MEMPHIS TN




Adams Class Ships

The initial statistics of the USS Charles F. Adams DDG-2 were:

Length: 437 feet Beam: 47 feet

Draft: 20 feet Displacement: 3,370 tons (Not Fully Loaded)
Statistics for the remaining Charles F. Adams Class were:

*** DDG-2 through DDG-9 was ordered as DD-952 through DD-959


      DDG-5 was originally commissioned as USS BIDDLE.
Data for USS Cochrane (DDG-21) as of 1982

Length between perpendiculars: 420’ 0" Length overall: 440’ 3"


Extreme Beam: 44’ 11 1/2" Limiting draft: 16’ 0"

Light Ship Displacement: 3,527 tons Full Load Displacement: 4,642 tons Fuel capacity: 736 tons


Armament
Two 5"/54 caliber guns One ASROC Launcher
Two 12.75" triple anti-submarine torpedo tubes
One Mark 13 Mod 0 Guided Missile Launching System (Tartar)
Complement
22 Officers 21 Chief Petty Officers 298 Enlisted
Propulsion
4 1200 PSI Boilers 2 General Electric Turbines: 70,000 horsepower

Speed: 35+ knots


Statistics of later Adams Class ships varied as enhancements were implemented.


Builders:

DDG 2-3, 10-11 Bath Iron Works;
DDG 4-6, 15-17 New York Shipbuilding;
DDG 7-8, 12-13 Defoe Shipbuilding;
DDG 9,14, 23-24 Todd Shipyards;
DDG 18-19 Avondale Shipyards;
DDG 20-22 Puget Sound Bridge and Dry-dock

Displacement

4,500 tons (full load)

Length

437 feet

Beam

47 feet

Max Speed

30 knots

Power Plant

4 - 1200 psi boilers; 2 geared turbines
2 shafts; 70,000 shaft horsepower

Aircraft

None - VERTREP capable only

Armament

Standard Missiles (MR)
Harpoon missiles (from Standard launcher)
ASROC (from MK 16 launcher)
2 - MK 32 triple tube mounts w/ six Mk-46 torpedoes)
2 - 5-inch / 54 caliber MK 42 gun

Complement

383 (20 officers, 363 enlisted)


Ships

Name

Number

Builder

Homeport

Ordered

Commissioned

Decommissioned

Charles F. Adams

DDG 2

Bath

Mayport

28 Mar 1957

10 Sep 1960

01 Aug 1990

John King

DDG 3

Bath

Norfolk

28 Mar 1957

04 Feb 1961

30 Mar 1990

Lawrence

DDG 4

New York SB

Norfolk

28 Mar 1957

06 Jan 1962

30 Mar 1990

USS Claude V. Ricketts
(Ex-Biddle)

DDG 5

New York SB

Norfolk

28 Mar 1957

05 May 1962

31 Oct 1989

Barney

DDG 6

New York SB

Norfolk

28 Mar 1957

11 Aug 1962

17 Dec 1990

Henry B. Wilson

DDG 7

Defoe SB

San Diego

28 Mar 1957

17 Dec 1960

02 Oct 1989

Lynde McCormick

DDG 8

Defoe SB

San Diego

28 Mar 1957

03 Jun 1961

01 Oct 1991

Towers

DDG 9

Todd Seattle

Yokosuka

28 Mar 1957

06 June 1961

01 Oct 1990

Sampson

DDG 10

Bath

Mayport

17 Jan 1958

24 Jun 1961

24 Jun 1991

Sellers

DDG 11

Bath

Charleston

17 Jan 1958

28 Oct 1961

31 Oct 1989

Robison

DDG 12

Defoe

San Diego

17 Jan 1958

09 Dec 1961

01 Oct 1991

Hoel

DDG 13

Defoe

San Diego

17 Jan 1958

16 Jun 1962

01 Oct 1990

Buchanan

DDG 14

Todd Seattle

San Diego

17 Jan 1958

07 Feb 1962

01 Oct 1991

Berkeley

DDG 15

New York SB

San Diego

21 Jul 1959

15 Dec 1962

01 Oct 1992

Joseph Strauss

DDG 16

New York SB

Pearl Harbor

21 Jul 1959

20 Apr 1963

01 Feb 1990

Conyngham

DDG 17

New York SB

Norfolk

21 Jul 1959

13 Jun 1963

30 Oct 1990

Semmes

DDG 18

Avondale

Charleston

21 Jul 1959

10 Dec 1962

12 Sep 1991

Tattnall

DDG 19

Avondale

Mayport

21 Jul 1959

13 Apr 1963

18 Jan 1991

Goldsborough

DDG 20

Puget Sound B&D

Pearl Harbor

25 Mar 1960

09 Nov 1963

29 Apr 1993

Cochrane

DDG 21

Puget Sound B&D

Yokosuka

25 Mar 1960

21 Mar 1963

01 Oct 1990

Benjamin Stoddert

DDG 22

Puget Sound B&D

Pearl Harbor

25 Mar 1960

12 Sep 1964

20 Dec 1991

Richard E. Byrd

DDG 23

Todd Seattle

Norfolk

03 Nov 1960

07 Mar 1964

27 Apr 1990

Waddell

DDG 24

Todd

San Diego

03 Nov 1960

28 Aug 1964

01 Oct 1992


What became of these magnificent ships?
Eventually all Adams Class DDG ships were either sold for scrap, put out to SinkEx and several were transferred to the Australian, German and Greek Navies.
Currently at Philadelphia Navy Shipyard

USS Charles F. Adams DDG-2 6/2005 - On “Donation Hold” By NAVSEA
Converted into power barge

USS Hoel DDG-13 Date Location Unknown (Maybe Manaus Brazil)
Sunk As SinkEx Targets

USS Henry B. Wilson DDG-7 8/15/03

USS Lynde McCormick DDG-8 2/24/01

USS Towers DDG-9 10/9/02

USS Buchanan DDG-14 6/14/00

USS Benjamin Stoddert DDG-22 2/23/01


Sold For Scrap

USS John King DDG-3 2/10/99

USS Lawrence DDG-4 12/-/03

USS Claude V. Rickets DDG-5 11/8/02

USS Barney DDG-6 6/2006

USS Sampson DDG-10 10/15/03

USS Sellers DDG-11 9/29/03

USS Robison DDG-12 6/21/94

USS Conyngham DDG-17 4/15/94

USS Tattnall DDG-19 2/10/99

USS Cochrane DDG-21 9/19/01
Transferred to the Greek Navy

USS Berkeley DDG-15 after 10/1/92;

USS Joseph P. Strauss DDG-16 after 2/1/90;

USS Semmes DDG-18 after 9/21/91;

USS Richard E Byrd DDG-23 after 4/27/90

USS Waddell DDG-24 after 10/1/92.


Transferred to the Australian Navy

USS Goldsborough DDG-20 after 4/29/93;


The Royal Australian Navy bought three Adams Class Destroyers from Defoe Shipbuilding. Substantially modified, they were re-classed as Perth Class Destroyers. From time to time, a class of ship emerges that is so successful that it continues to be useful well beyond normal life expectation. The Royal Australian Navy's three American built Charles F. Adams class destroyers, constructed during the 1960s, are examples of such an exceptional design. HMAS Perth was the first of three guided missile destroyers (DDG’s) built in the United States for Australia. She was commissioned in July 1965 and arrived in Australia in March 1966. Her sister ships were Hobart and Brisbane. They all saw operational service during the Vietnam War.

Australia - Perth Class

D 38

HMAS Perth

D 39

HMAS Hobart

D 40

HMAS Brisbane

HMAS PERTH SYSTEMS



All three RAN DDG's underwent an extensive modernization of their Combat System between 1986-1992, with Brisbane being the first to undergo the upgrades to see her through to an anticipated de-commissioning year of 2001. HMAS Perth decommissioned on 15 October 1999, and HMAS Hobart on 12 May 2000
Despite periodic modernizations, the class was retired in the early 1990s. Modernization with the New Threat Upgrade (NTU) package was considered for these ships but was terminated since modernization would not have been cost effective given the limited service lives remaining. As part of the 1989 Amended budget submission, the decision was made to accelerate the retirement of these ships to achieve complete retirement of the class by the end of FY 93. The highly capable, multi-mission, AEGIS equipped, Arleigh Burke (DDG 51) class replaced these ships.
German Navy

Germany - Lutjens Class

D 185

FGS Lutjens

D 186

FGS Molders

D 187

FGS Rommel


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