Aff Starter Pack – Search for mh370


All Other Backlines for this Advantage



Download 1.41 Mb.
Page22/26
Date22.04.2018
Size1.41 Mb.
1   ...   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26

All Other Backlines for this Advantage



Issue-specific uniqueness




Asia Pivot still at the crossroads – many “swing-nations” still exist, but currently lean against Washington.



Singh ‘14

Abhijit Singh is a Research Fellow at the Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses. He looks at maritime strategic issues in the broader Indo-Pacific region, and littoral security in the Indian Ocean. ASIAN STRATEGIC REVIEW: US Pivot and Asian Security – a book edited by S.D. Muni, Vivek Chadha – From Chapter Four: “Restructuring the Maritime “Pivot”—Latest



Developments in the US Rebalance to Asia” – by Abhijit Singh – http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&ved=0CCUQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fidsa.in%2Fsystem%2Ffiles%2Fbook_ASR2013.pdf&ei=AY-XU8rjNuaO8gG3g4CQBg&usg=AFQjCNG_ooiEIMhuGCnMzg7oy_t67sZTgQ
To co-opt other stakeholders into the broader Pivot strategy, the US needs a practical and effective plan. The nature of cooperation it expects from regional states, however, appears premised on their initial responses to the Pivot. Since its announcement, the rebalance has elicited fundamentally dissimilar reactions from regional states.20 These can be broadly classified into three distinct categories: The first is one of “staunch oppositionexemplified by China’s response to what it sees as a clear example of a “China-containment” strategy.21 Beijing’s strident criticism of the US strategy in the Asia-Pacific appears driven by fears of a reduction of its own strategic influence in the region—a reflection of the People’s Liberation Army-Navy’s (PLA-N’s) growing maritime ambitions.22 China has adopted a novel strategy of nuancing its disapproval of the rebalance in a manner to appear rational and objective. To deny the US a ready-made justification for increasing its strategic presence in the Pacific, Chinese media and government agencies have alternated between ‘caustic criticism’ and ‘measured disapproval’ in opposing the US maritime strategy in the region.23 In the second category are those states that explicitly support the rebalance. The Philippines, Japan and South Koreaembroiled in protracted maritime territorial disputes with China—have officially come out in favour of the policy,24 and lead the clamour for greater American security presence in the Pacific. An exception to this general description of states fully supporting the Pivot has been Singapore that has qualified its embrace of close strategic cooperation with the US as premised on the latter’s “stabilizing [sic] influence” in the region.25 More broadly, however, all such states believe that the rebalance is a strategic necessity in restoring the security balance in the Pacific. Finally, there are states that were ambivalent about the rebalance. Spanning the vast expanse of the Asia-Pacific and South Asia, this rather substantial bunch— despite close individual ties with the US—has been more circumspect in offering their unqualified support to the policy. Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia and India are examples of such states. Wary of having to choose between Washington and Beijing these states have expressed their reluctance to be seen to be siding with the former.26 Paradoxically, in their strategic deliberations with the US, most of these nations have expressed satisfaction at the improvement shown by Washington in its commitment to the Asia-Pacific region. While publicly empathising with them, the US has sought to enlist the support of these ’swing states’, whose cooperation is deemed critical for the success of the Pivot.

Asian nations perceive insufficient US commitment to the Pivot now.



Singh ‘14

Abhijit Singh is a Research Fellow at the Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses. He looks at maritime strategic issues in the broader Indo-Pacific region, and littoral security in the Indian Ocean. ASIAN STRATEGIC REVIEW: US Pivot and Asian Security – a book edited by S.D. Muni, Vivek Chadha – From Chapter Four: “Restructuring the Maritime “Pivot”—Latest

Developments in the US Rebalance to Asia” – by Abhijit Singh – http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&ved=0CCUQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fidsa.in%2Fsystem%2Ffiles%2Fbook_ASR2013.pdf&ei=AY-XU8rjNuaO8gG3g4CQBg&usg=AFQjCNG_ooiEIMhuGCnMzg7oy_t67sZTgQ

In light of the recent political events in Asia, speculation is rife that the US may be forced to slow down its Pivot to the Asia-Pacific.1 With the crisis in Syria still unresolved and tensions persisting in the Middle East over Iran’s nuclear program, America’s rebalancing strategy seems to have been somewhat undermined. To complicate matters, an increasingly assertive Chinese Navy in the Western Pacific is making the US traditional allies in Southeast Asia deeply anxious. The slow realisation that its strategic manoeuvre to East Asia may not follow a planned trajectory seems to have induced a degree of caution in Washington, under growing pressure to bring the strategy to fruition without provoking China.

Issue-Specific Uniqueness – Malaysia-specific

( ) For the Pivot, Malaysia’s on the crossroads. They lean against the US in the squo.



Mishra ‘14

Dr Rahul Mishra is a Research Fellow at Indian Council of World Affairs, New Delhi. He specialises on political, economic, foreign policy and security aspects of countries and regional groupings of Southeast Asia. ASIAN STRATEGIC REVIEW: US Pivot and Asian Security – a book edited by S.D. Muni, Vivek Chadha – From Chapter Ten: “The US Rebalancing Strategy: Responses from Southeast Asia” http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&ved=0CCUQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fidsa.in%2Fsystem%2Ffiles%2Fbook_ASR2013.pdf&ei=AY-XU8rjNuaO8gG3g4CQBg&usg=AFQjCNG_ooiEIMhuGCnMzg7oy_t67sZTgQ


In so far as the Malaysian response to the US Rebalancing towards Asia is concerned, “Cautious optimism” most aptly explains its position.58 Evidently, “the most problematic strategic conundrum facing Malaysia is the South China Sea and managing its relations with both the US and China.”59 Malaysia is likely to continue to embrace China’s rise and give it the benefit of the doubt. Moreover, it will continue to downplay regional anxieties about China’s military build-up. But if China decides that amphibious landing ships are the best tools to resolve disputes, Malaysia may well need to rethink its present approach.60 The recent visit of the Malaysian Defence Minister is indicative of the fact that Malaysia is striving hard to keep a fine balance in terms of its relations with the US and China. The two sides have also agreed to upgrade bilateral military ties and go in for regular joint training programmes.




Download 1.41 Mb.

Share with your friends:
1   ...   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26




The database is protected by copyright ©ininet.org 2020
send message

    Main page