Chapter 7 Schedule Control



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CHAPTER 7

Schedule Control

True/False
1. Once a project actually starts, it’s necessary to monitor the progress to ensure that everything is going according to schedule.

ANSWER: T


2. The key to effective project control is to measure production quality and compare it to efficiency measures on a timely and regular basis and to take necessary corrective action immediately.

ANSWER: F


3. The project control process should at occur once at the beginning and then again at end of the project.

ANSWER: F


4. A project manager should gather data at the beginning of the month that will be used at the end of the month to calculate an updated schedule and budget.

ANSWER: F


5. The project control process continues throughout the project.

ANSWER: T


6. In general, the longer the reporting period, the better the chances of identifying problems early and taking effective corrective actions.

ANSWER: F


7. Establishing a sound baseline plan is sufficient project control.

ANSWER: F


8. The finish estimates (FE) of completed activities will determine the earliest start and earliest finish times for the remaining activities in the network diagram, as well as the total slack.

ANSWER: F


9. One method to indicate on the network diagram which activities have been completed is to shade or crosshatch the activity box.

ANSWER: T


10. Throughout a project, changes should always be resisted if they have an impact on the schedule.

ANSWER: F


11. When the customer requests a change, the contractor or project team should estimate the impact on the project budget and schedule and then obtain customer approval before proceeding.

ANSWER: T


12. After actual data or project changes are incorporated or after corrective actions are planned, it is no longer necessary to analyze the newly calculated schedule to determine whether it needs further attention.

ANSWER: F


13. When attempting to get a schedule back on track, the path with the most positive slack should be given top priority.

ANSWER: F


14. A change in the estimated duration of any activity on a path will cause a corresponding change in the slack for that path.

ANSWER: T


15. In most cases, eliminating negative slack by reducing durations of activities will involve a trade-off in the form of an increase in production hours or an increase in scope.

ANSWER: F


16. Addressing schedule problems early will minimize the negative impact on cost and scope.

ANSWER: T


17. The time–quality trade-off methodology is used to incrementally reduce the project duration with the smallest associated increase in incremental cost.

ANSWER: F


18. Each activity has two pairs of duration and cost estimates: normal and flash.

ANSWER: F


19. The normal time is the shortest estimated length of time in which the activity can be completed.

ANSWER: F


20. An activity cannot be completed in less than its crash time, no matter how many additional resources are applied.

ANSWER: T




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