Content Area: Science and Social Studies Targeted Grade Level



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Commotion in the Ocean: An integrated, thematic first grade unit.

Leslie Lauren Thurmon

Social Studies/Science – ECMT 6030

Summer 2009



Overview of Unit

Unit Title: Commotion in the Ocean: A first grade thematic unit. Content Area: Science and Social Studies Targeted Grade Level: First Grade Unit Length: Instructional Unit of 5 lessons (30-50 minutes each) including pre-assessment and summative assessment.

Commotion in the Ocean, am integrated, thematic first grade Social Studies and science unit, focuses on the major oceans and the sea life that inhabit those bodies of water. The unit will address an overarching concept of location and teach students the relationship between their location (i.e. where they live) and the location of the major oceans and animals that live in the oceans. In this unit, students will research an ocean of their choice and several ocean animals. Upon completion of the unit, the students will have a general understanding of where each ocean is located and which animals live in the individual oceans.

Georgia Performance Standards Addressed:

Life Science

S1L1. Students will investigate the characteristics and basic needs of plants and animals.

b. Identify the basic needs of an animal.




  1. Air

  2. Water

  3. Food

  4. Shelter

d. Compare and describe various animals—appearance, motion, growth, basic needs



Geographic Understandings
SS1G2 The student will identify and locate his/her city, county, state, nation, and continent on a simple map or a globe.
SS1G3 The student will locate major topographical features of the earth’s surface.



  1. Locate all of the continents: North America, South America, Africa, Europe, Asia, Antarctica, and Australia.
    b. Locate the major oceans: Arctic, Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian.

Supporting Standards addressed in this unit:



Co-Requisite - Characteristics of Science

Habits of Mind
S1CS4. Students will use the ideas of system, model, change, and scale in exploring scientific and technological matters.



  1. Compare very different sizes, weights, ages (baby/adult), and speeds (fast/slow) of both human made and natural things.



Data Analysis and Probability
Students will pose questions, collect, organize and interpret data about themselves and their surroundings.
M1D1. Students will create simple tables and graphs and interpret them.
a. Interpret tally marks, picture graphs, and bar graphs.
b. Pose questions, collect, sort, organize and record data using objects, pictures, tally marks, picture graphs, and bar graphs.

Unit Goals:
The student should:

  1. Know what maps and globes represent.

  2. Understand the difference between land and water

  3. Understand that nearly 3/4ths of the earth’s surface is covered by water.

  4. Understand that there are five oceans (Pacific Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, Indian Ocean, Southern Ocean, Arctic Ocean).

  5. Understand that the earth is comprised of one global, interconnected body of water.

  6. Understand that there are animals that live in the Earth’s oceans.

  7. Understand the different characteristics of these animals.



Unit Objectives:
The Student will:

  1. Orally identify the differences between maps and globes.

  2. Identify (on a map and globe) the two basic features of maps and globes:
    land and water.

  3. List the oceans of the world.

  4. Label the five oceans on a world map

  5. Differentiate between the different ocean climates.

  6. Give an oral description of three ocean animals.



Enduring Understandings:


  • Students will understand that the purpose of maps and globes are to determine location.

  • Students will understand the difference between land and water on maps and globes.

  • Students will understand the location and names of the oceans.

  • Students will understand the diversity of ocean life.

  • Students will understand that location applies to where things are located on maps and globes.

  • Students will understand that location applies to where specific animals live.


Essential Questions:



  1. How much of the earth’s surface is made up of water?

  2. How many oceans are there?

  3. How do the oceans differ in temperature and climate?

  4. What animals live in the ocean?

  5. Which ocean is the smallest and coldest?

  6. Which ocean is the largest?

  7. What is the size of the Arctic Ocean in relation to the other four oceans?

  8. What is the temperature of the oceans in relation to the other four oceans?

  9. Where is the polar bear found?

  10. What are some characteristics of the polar bear?

  11. What keeps the polar bear warm in such cold temperatures?

  12. What is the size of the Pacific Ocean in relation to the other four oceans?

  13. What is the temperature of the Pacific Ocean in relation to the other four oceans?

  14. Where are whales and dolphins found?

  15. What are some characteristics of whales?

  16. What are some characteristics of dolphins?


Essential Vocabulary:


  • animal - living being that can move;

  • Arctic - of, relating to, or suitable for use at the north pole or the region around it; very cold

  • blubber - the fat of whales and other large sea mammals

  • continents - one of the great divisions of land (as North America, South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, or Antarctica) on the globe

  • cruise - to travel by boat often stopping at a series of ports

  • dolphin - any of various small whales with teeth and a long nose

  • Echolocation - a process for locating distant or invisible objects by means of sound waves reflected back to the sender from the objects

  • globe - a round object; a model of the earth or heavens

  • land - the solid part of the surface of the earth

  • location - the act or process of locating

  • map - a drawing or picture showing selected features of an area (as the surface of the earth or the moon or a section of the brain) and usually drawn to a given scale

  • ocean - the whole body of salt water that covers nearly three fourths of the surface of the earth

  • polar bear - a large creamy-white fish-eating bear that lives in arctic regions

  • sea turtle - any of various large marine turtles (as the green turtle or the loggerhead) that have paddle-shaped feet to aid in swimming

  • temperature - the degree of hotness or coldness of something (as air, water, or the body) as shown by a thermometer

  • water - the liquid that descends from the clouds as rain, forms streams, lakes, and seas, and is a major part of all living material and that is an odorless and tasteless compound having two atoms of hydrogen and one atom of oxygen per molecule

  • whale - a water-dwelling mammal (as a humpback whale or a killer whale) that is a cetacean of usually very large size with a torpedo-shaped body, front limbs modified into flippers but no hind limbs, and a tail flattened and extended to the sides as flukes and that usually breathes through an opening on top of the head

  • United States - country North America bordering on Atlantic, Pacific, & Arctic oceans & including Hawaii; capital, Washington


Student dictionary. Retrieved July 12, 2009, from http://wordcentral.com/home.html

Schematic Map Unit Title: Commotion in the Ocean First grade Social Studies and Science Author: Leslie Lauren Thurmon



Calendar


Instructional Day

Date

Instructional Topic

Instruction Time

1

December 4, 2009

Pre-Assessment

20 minutes

2

December 5, 2009

Intro to

Location & Topography through Maps and Globes



50 minutes

3

December 6-7, 2009

The Oceans

40 minutes

4

December 6-7, 2009

Ocean Animals

50 minutes

5

December 8-9, 2009

Arctic Ocean and the Polar Bear

65 minutes

6

December 10-11, 2009

Pacific Ocean and Whales and Dolphins

45 minutes

7

December 12-14, 2009

Culminating Project

and


Summative Assessment

1-1.5 hours

(in-class time to complete project the day following the presentations)














Pre-assessment (5 minutes per student)

Explain to the student that you are going to ask them some questions. Tell them that there are no wrong answers and that they should answer as best they can. Ask the pre-assessment questions and record the answer that is closest to the student’s reply. Transfer the information to the data sheet.

Pre-Assessment



Question

Strong Knowledge

2 points


Some Knowledge

1 point


No

Knowledge

0 points


Score

What is a map?

Accurately describes characteristics of maps.

Can somewhat describe a map.

Has no knowledge of maps.




What is a globe?

Accurately describes characteristics of a globe.

Con somewhat describe a globe.

Has no knowledge of globes.




What makes up the Ocean?

Accurately identifies that the ocean is made up of water.

n/a

Has no knowledge of what makes up the ocean.




How many oceans are there?

Accurately identifies that there are 4 oceans.

The student believes there is one big ocean.

Has no knowledge of how many oceans exist.




Does the Earth have more water or land?

Accurately answers that the Earth is made up of more water than land.

The student believes that the Earth is half water and half land.

Has no knowledge of the Earth’s composition.




Name three animals that live in the ocean.

Accurately names three animals that live in the ocean.

Accurately names one or two animals that live in the ocean.

Has no knowledge of any ocean animals.




Post-assessment (5 minutes per student)

Explain to the student that you are going to ask them some questions to see what they have learned during this unit. Tell them that there are no wrong answers and that they should answer as best they can. Ask the post-assessment questions and record the answer that is closest to the student’s reply. Transfer the information to the data sheet.

Post-Assessment

Question

Strong Knowledge

2 points


Some Knowledge

1 point


No

Knowledge

0 points


Score

What is the difference between maps and globes?

Accurately distinguishes between maps and globes.

Can somewhat distinguish the differences of maps and globes.

Has no knowledge of maps and/or globes.




How many oceans are there?

Accurately identifies that there are 5 oceans.

The student believes there is one big ocean.

Has no knowledge of how many oceans there are.




Name the oceans?

Accurately names the 5 oceans.

Accurately names some of the oceans.

Cannot name the oceans.




Which ocean is the coldest?

Accurately identifies that the Arctic ocean is the coldest.

Makes an educated guess as to which ocean is the coldest.

Has no knowledge of which ocean is the coldest.




Which ocean is the largest?

Accurately identifies that the Pacific ocean is the largest.

Makes and educated guess as to which ocean is the largest.

Has no knowledge of which ocean is the largest.




Name three animals that live in the ocean (not named in the pre-assessment).

Accurately names three animals that live in the ocean (not named in the pre-assessment).

Accurately names one or two animals that live in the ocean.

Cannot name any animals that live in the ocean.




Data Sheet

Student Name

Question

#1


Question

#2


Question

#3


Question

#4


Question

#5


Question

#6








Pre-

Post-

Pre-

Post-

Post-

Post-

Post-

Post-

Pre-

Post-

Post-

Post-


















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Unit Title: Commotion in the Ocean

Lesson One: Maps, maps, maps.

Teacher: Leslie Lauren Thurmon, Armstrong Atlantic State University

Time Frame: 50 minutes

Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is to enhance the student’s knowledge about maps, globes and location.

Georgia Standards:

Geographic Understandings
SS1G2 The student will identify and locate his/her city, county, state, nation, and continent on a simple map or a globe.
SS1G3 The student will locate major topographical features of the earth’s surface.



  1. Locate all of the continents: North America, South America, Africa, Europe, Asia, Antarctica, and Australia.
    b. Locate the major oceans: Arctic, Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian.



S1CS4. Students will use the ideas of system, model, change, and scale in exploring scientific and technological matters.



  1. Compare very different sizes, weights, ages (baby/adult), and speeds (fast/slow) of both human made and natural things.

Objectives:

The student will:



  1. Identify (on a map and globe) the two basic features of maps and globes:
    land and water.

  2. Construct a mind-map with the teacher verbally and visually of things that they want to learn about the ocean.

  3. Draw a map of their face to scale.


Essential Questions:

What is a map and/or globe?

What is the difference between a map and a globe?
What do maps represent?

What do globes represent?


Essential Vocabulary:

  • Globe

  • Map

  • Water

  • Land

Materials:

  • Mirror

  • Paper and pencil

  • Sweeny, J. (1998). Me on the map. New York: Crown.

  • map and globe

  • globe handout with the lyrics to the Land and Water song

(2003). Maps and Globes. Retrieved July 9, 2009, from http://www.indianastandardsresources.org/files/soc/ss_k_3_2.pdf

Procedures:

Introduction (10 minutes):




  1. Each child will have a mirror at their desk. Ask the child to look at their reflection in the mirror.

  2. Ask the children to draw the face they see in the mirror to scale on a sheet of paper provided.

  3. After this exercise, explain to the children that maps are things that represent places and things.

  4. Explain that the picture they drew is a map because it represents their face.

  5. In addition, the teacher can use directional words to explain where different facial features (locations) are on their faces (maps).

Instructional Activities (30 minutes):




  1. The teacher will perform a read aloud activity using the book Me on the Map.

  2. Before reading the book, ask the children if they know what a map is.

  3. After reading the book, ask the children what maps represent. They should use knowledge they gained from the book.

  4. Explain to the children that the world map is a representation of the Earth.

  5. Go over the world map in detail teaching the children the characteristics of land and water. Differentiate between the continents and the oceans. Talk about their sizes and shapes.

  6. Introduce a globe and ask the children what it might represent.

  7. Help students understand that the globe is also a representation of Earth, but that it is different from the map.

  8. Have the children compare and contrast the map and the globe.

  9. Next, have the children differentiate between water and land on both ethe map and globe.

  10. Show students areas of land and bodies of water on the map and the globe.

  11. Introduce a new song to help the children retain the information they are learning about land and water.

  12. Display the chart paper on which you recorded the lyrics from the BLM Land and Water.

  13. Teach the students the lyrics by reciting the words.

  14. Model the song for students. Lead them as they sing the song to the tune of “Fre`re Jacques.”

  15. Repeat the lyrics until the children have learned how to sing it without hesitation.

Closing Activities (10 minutes):




  1. In addition to learning about maps and in preparation for our unit on oceans, the students will construct a mind-map.

  2. The teacher will draw an example of an octopus on the white board with the body and all of the tentacles coming out from the body.

  3. In the Octopus’ body we will put the concept of oceans.

  4. Next, the students will be asked to say whatever comes to mind when they think about the ocean. The teacher will write their responses in the tentacles of the octopus.

  5. This student created mind-map will serve as a basis for the next lessons.


Note to teacher:
Students will have prior experience in mind-mapping. If you are a teacher who lets your students decide what they want to learn, then the mind-map will help you introduce oceans, but also teach the students about what is most fascinating to them when they think about the ocean. For example, the student constructed mind-map for this unit might have included water, ocean animals, specifically polar bears, dolphins, and whales, boats, and ocean cruises.

Evaluation:

The evaluation method will be a teacher-constructed pencil and paper test. When asked the following questions, the students will either record their answers or draw pictures to illustrate their answers in their journals.



  1. What does a globe show us?

  2. What does a world map show us?

  3. Do all maps represent Earth?

  4. Explain how you know that.

  5. Is this [point to a body of water on a map] land or water?

  6. How do you know that?

Accommodations for Special students:

Some accommodations for ESL students are as follows: use visual aids, introduce key vocabulary prior to lesson and write the vocabulary on the board, allow for extended time on assignments and grade only what has been completed, provide peer tutoring, and draw ESL students gradually into class discussions.



Enrichment:

The students who finish early can draw a map of their neighborhood including their house, street, local park, local school, etc.



Follow Up:

The next lesson will introduce the Ocean(s).



Appendices:

Song

Land and water,

Land and water,

Where are you?

Where are you?

Use a map to find them.

You will surely find them.

Green and blue!

Green and blue!

Ideas and song adapted from:


(2003). Maps and Globes. Retrieved July 9, 2009, from http://www.indianastandardsresources.org/files/soc/ss_k_3_2.pdf

Unit Title: Commotion in the Ocean

Lesson Two: The Earth’s Ocean?

Teacher: Leslie Lauren Thurmon, Armstrong Atlantic State University

Time Frame: 40 minutes

Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is to evaluate the student’s prior knowledge about

the oceans.



Georgia Standards:

Geographic Understandings
SS1G2 The student will identify and locate his/her city, county, state, nation, and continent on a simple map or a globe.
SS1G3 The student will locate major topographical features of the earth’s surface.



  1. Locate all of the continents: North America, South America, Africa, Europe, Asia, Antarctica, and Australia.
    b. Locate the major oceans: Arctic, Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian.


Supporting Standards addressed in this unit:



Data Analysis and Probability
Students will pose questions, collect, organize and interpret data about themselves and their surroundings.
M1D1. Students will create simple tables and graphs and interpret them.


  1. Interpret tally marks, picture graphs, and bar graphs.




  1. Pose questions, collect, sort, organize and record data using objects, pictures, tally marks, picture graphs, and bar graphs.


Objectives:

The student will:



  1. Identify (on a map and globe) the two basic features of maps and globes:
    land and water.

  2. Label the five oceans


Essential Questions:

How much of the earth’s surface is made up of water?

How many oceans are there?
Essential Vocabulary:


  • Globe

  • Ocean

  • Water

  • Land

Materials:

  • Inflatable globe, markers and whiteboard

Procedures:

Introduction (10 minutes):




  1. The teacher will ask the students to raise their hand if they have ever been to an ocean before. The teacher will also ask for student volunteers to explain their ocean experience.

  2. The teacher will then ask the class some questions related to their ocean experience. For example, Do you know the name of the ocean? Did you taste the water? What did it taste like? Was it warm or cold? Etc.

  3. The teacher will ask the students to guess how many oceans there are on the Earth. After the students have suggested a few different numbers, the teacher will show the students the globe, and then everyone will count the oceans as the teacher points to them on the globe. (5 total)

  4. The teacher will also explain to the students that these oceans have names; Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic and Southern Oceans.

Instructional Activities (20 minutes):




  1. The teacher will motivate students by saying, "I wonder how much of the Earth is covered with water?" Ask the students if they think there is more water or land on the Earth.

  2. The class will play a game to find out if there is more water or land on the Earth. Using the inflatable globe, the teacher will toss it around the room to each student. Each student that catches the globe should tell the teacher where their right thumb landed; on water or on land. The teacher will record this data on a simple data table that she had created on the marker board. After she has recorded the data, the student should toss the ball back to the teacher. The teacher will toss the ball to another student and repeat the process. This activity will repeat until we have enough information to show that there is more water than land by looking at our tally marks.

  3. The teacher will ask the students if they notice anything about the tally marks. Ask the students if their thumbs landed on water or land more times. The teacher will use this information to explain to the students that there is more water on the Earth than there is land.


Alternate globe activity:

Place the students in pairs having one student be the record keeper and

the other a globe spinner. The spinner spins the globe and randomly

touches a point on the globe. The recorder tallies the number of times the

spinner touches land and the number of times he/she touches water.
Closing Activities (10 minutes):


  1. The teacher will give a brief lesson review and/or summary. The assessment will proceed with the following questions:

-How many oceans are on the earth?

-Can you name them?

-Is there more land or water on the earth?

-How do you know?



Evaluation:

The teacher will informally evaluate the students by oral discussion using the questions stated above in the Closing Activities portion of the procedures.



Accommodations for Special students:

Some accommodations for ESL students are as follows: use visual aids, introduce key vocabulary prior to lesson and write the vocabulary on the board, allow for extended time on assignments and grade only what has been completed, provide peer tutoring, and draw ESL students gradually into class discussions.



Enrichment:

The students can do additional research on the five oceans to see which is the smallest, which is the largest, and which is the coldest. This research can be done using the National Geographic for Kids website.



Follow Up:

The next lesson is on life in the ocean.



Unit Title: Commotion in the Ocean

Lesson Three: Wonderful Ocean Animals.

Teacher: Leslie Lauren Thurmon, Armstrong Atlantic State University

Time Frame: 50 minutes

Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is to give the students a comprehensive overview of the animals found in the ocean.

Georgia Standards:

Life Science

S1L1. Students will investigate the characteristics and basic needs of plants and animals.

b. Identify the basic needs of an animal.




  1. Air

  2. Water

  3. Food

  4. Shelter

d. Compare and describe various animals—appearance, motion, growth, basic needs


Objectives:

The student will:



  1. Identify three of more animals that inhabit the oceans.

  2. List the external characteristics of three ocean animals


Essential Questions:

What animals live in the ocean?

What are some animals that live in each of the oceans? (Continue to use the mind-mapping approach)
Essential Vocabulary:


  • Animal

  • Dolphin

  • Polar Bear

  • Sea Turtle

  • Whale

Materials:

  • Ocean animal flash cards

  • Resource books

Spilsbury, R., & Spilsbury, L.  (Eds.).  (2004). A school of dolphins.  Chicago, IL: Heinemann.

Stonehouse, B. (1998). Animal watch: a visual introduction to whales, dolphins, and porpoises. New York: Checkmark Books.

Patent, D.  (2000). Polar Bears.  Minneapolis: Carolrhoda Books.

Stone, L. (1998). Penguins. Minneapolis, MN: Lerner Publications Company.

Taylor, L. (1998). Jellyfish. Minneapolis, MN: Lerner Publications Company.

Lepthien, E. (1996). Sea Turtles. New York: Children’s Press.

McGovern, A. (1995). Questions and answers about sharks. New York: Scholastic.

Procedures:

Introduction (10 minutes):




  1. The teacher will ask the students if they can name three animals that live in the water.

  2. The teacher will then ask the class some questions related to ocean animals. For example, Do ocean animals breathe air? Do different ocean animals live together? Do specific ocean animals live in specific oceans where it is only warm or only cold?

  3. The teacher will ask the students to guess which animals live in warm climates and which animals live in cold climates.

  4. The teacher will also explain to the students that these animals all have different visible characteristics. Some have fur, some have scales, some are big, and some are small.

Instructional Activities (30 minutes):


  1. The teacher will show the students several pictures of ocean animals and explain where they live and what visible characteristics they have.

  2. The students will get into groups and take turns visiting resource stations to gather information about the different ocean animals. The students have to take notes in their Ocean Wonder journals about the different characteristics of the animals.

  3. The students will then be asked to list three ocean animals that they like the best and write them down in their journals.

  4. The students will have to tell the class what there three favorite ocean animals are and explain the visible characteristics of one of those animals. The student will have to tell what kind of skin the animal has, explain the size of the animal and also what type of climate the animal lives in. Going further, the students can describe what the animals eat.

Closing Activities (10 minutes):


The students will learn a song about ocean animals so that they can sing it at parent night.

Evaluation:

The teacher will evaluate the students by making notes as the students participate in oral discussion about the ocean animals they have studied.



Accommodations for Special students:

Some accommodations for ESL students are as follows: use visual aids, introduce key vocabulary prior to lesson and write the vocabulary on the board, allow for extended time on assignments and grade only what has been completed, provide peer tutoring, and draw ESL students gradually into class discussions.



Enrichment:

If the students finish early, they can work on an ocean floor puzzle.



Follow Up:

The next lesson is on the Arctic Ocean and the Polar Bear.



Unit Title: Commotion in the Ocean

Lesson Four: Arctic Adventure

Teacher: Leslie Lauren Thurmon, Armstrong Atlantic State University

Time Frame: 65 minutes

Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is to teach the students about the Arctic ocean and the Polar regions and the animals that inhabit that region, focusing on the Polar Bear.

Georgia Standards:

Geographic Understandings

SS1G3 The student will locate major topographical features of the earth’s surface.

b. Locate the major oceans: Arctic, Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian.


Life Science

S1L1. Students will investigate the characteristics and basic needs of plants and animals.

b. Identify the basic needs of an animal.




  1. Air

  2. Water

  3. Food

  4. Shelter

d. Compare and describe various animals—appearance, motion, growth, basic needs



Objectives:

The student will:



  1. Demonstrate proficient knowledge about the Arctic Ocean such as size, temperature, and location.

  2. Demonstrate proficient knowledge about polar bears such as size, visible characteristics, and what they eat.


Essential Questions:

What is the size of the Arctic Ocean in relation to the other four oceans?

What is the temperature of the Arctic Ocean in relation to the other four oceans?

Where is the polar bear found?

What are some characteristics of the polar bear?

What keeps the polar bear warm in such cold temperatures?


Essential Vocabulary:


  • Arctic

  • Blubber

  • Cruise

  • Polar Bear


Materials:

  • Globe

  • de Beer, H.  (2004). Little Polar Bear.  New York: North-South Books.

  • Ocean Wonder journals

  • Arctic Adventure ticket

  • Smart board with Arctic Ocean facts

  • Polar bear video

  • Blubber gloves (already made)

  • Coffee, two glass jars, cloth, plastic wrap, food thermometer (Polar Bear Warmth activity)

Note to Teacher:

To make the blubber glove, use two zip lock plastic bags and fill one with Crisco (about 1 cup). Use the other bag to place on top of the Crisco so the students are not touching the Crisco. Attempt to zip together by having the top one inside out.

A bowl should be filled with water and ice, and the teacher should guide the students in putting the glove on and putting their hand in the water. Tell them to pretend they are polar bears ready to dive into the cold icy water.

Students may touch water with one hand before or after using the glove to compare the difference of having the glove on and not having it on.



Procedures:

Introduction (10 minutes):




  1. Show the students a globe and point out the north and south poles.

  2. Describe the winter terrain, including icebergs and icy water that can be found near the poles.

  3. Ask the students to apply the knowledge they gained in the oceans lesson to apply to this lesson by identifying where the Arctic Ocean is located.

  4. Describe that there are specific animals that live in this ocean and in this region. Say the following: “Many animals live where it is cold all the time. Who can name some?”

  5. Discuss the word “arctic”. Explain that arctic animals live where it is very cold all the time, like the North Pole where Santa lives.

Instructional Activities (30 minutes):




  1. The teacher will read Little Polar Bear by Hans de Beer.

  2. Show the students the cover of the book and ask for predictions.

  3. Read the book reminding students to look for the different animals the bear meets.

  4. After the story, ask what other animals did the polar bear meet? Raise your hand if you think all these animals could survive in the cold Arctic? Why do you think this? How do you think the Polar Bear survives the cold weather and swimming in the icy water?

  5. Write responses on paper.

  6. Explain that polar bears have a layer of fat called blubber that keeps him warm. Ask students what they wear to keep warm.

  7. The teacher will give the students a ticket to an “Arctic Adventure” cruise through the Arctic Ocean. On this cruise, the students will learn about this cold ocean and the Polar Bear, which lives in this ocean and region.

  8. The students will be given oral instruction that outline that there are several stations they can visit. Upon completion of each station, the student will get a hole punch in their ticket.

  9. The students will visit three stations: the first station where the students will learn facts about the Arctic Ocean, the second where students will learn the characteristics of the Polar Bear, and the third where students will complete two Polar Bear activities; experience the blubber glove and Polar Bear warmth.

Closing Activities (25 minutes):


  1. Polar Bear Warmth

Pour one cup of strong black coffee (that has cooled to room temperature) into each of two glass jars. Cover one jar with a piece of white cloth, and another jar with a piece of clear plastic wrap. Then put both jars in the sun for an hour or more. Use a food thermometer to check the temperature of the coffee in each jar. Which is warmer? Can you explain why?

And now for the polar bear’s secret: Polar bears are not really white. If they were, they couldn’t stay warm in their Arctic habitat. As you just learned, white reflects sunlight and the heat that comes with it. The hairs in a polar bear’s coat are clear. The hollow center of each hair soaks up light from the sun, and the light filters out the sides. That’s what makes polar bears look white. Each clear hair carries heat from the sun down to the polar bear’s skin. It’s skin is black, which means it soaks up the heat to keep the bear warm. A polar bear is like the plastic-covered coffee in your experiment: Clear on the outside, black on the inside-and plenty warm!



  1. Have the students write three sentences explaining their “Arctic Adventure” in their Ocean wonder journals.


Evaluation:

The instrument used for evaluation will be a teacher-constructed true/false test to determine the student’s comprehension of the material taught. See appendices.



Accommodations for Special students:

Some accommodations for ESL students are as follows: use visual aids, introduce key vocabulary prior to lesson and write the vocabulary on the board, allow for extended time on assignments and grade only what has been completed, provide peer tutoring, and draw ESL students gradually into class discussions.



Enrichment:

If students finish early, they can draw and color things they wear to keep them warm.



Follow Up:

The next lesson is on the Pacific Ocean and whales and dolphins



Appendices:

True/False Test Questions



  1. The Arctic Ocean water is warm.

  2. The Arctic Ocean is the smallest of the five oceans.

  3. The Polar Bear has white fur and black skin.

  4. The Polar Bear uses his blubber to keep him warm.

Ideas adapted from:
Slaughter, L. (1999). Travel to the Polar Lands. Retrieved July 10, 2009, from http://www.atozteacherstuff.com/pages/382.shtml

Unit Title: Commotion in the Ocean

Lesson Five: Playing in the Pacific

Teacher: Leslie Lauren Thurmon, Armstrong Atlantic State University

Time Frame: 45 minutes

Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is to teach the students about the Pacific Ocean and the animals that inhabit that region, focusing on whales and dolphins.

Georgia Standards:

Geographic Understandings

SS1G3 The student will locate major topographical features of the earth’s surface.

b. Locate the major oceans: Arctic, Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian.


Life Science

S1L1. Students will investigate the characteristics and basic needs of plants and animals.

b. Identify the basic needs of an animal.




  1. Air

  2. Water

  3. Food

  4. Shelter

d. Compare and describe various animals—appearance, motion, growth, basic needs



Objectives:

The student will:



  1. Demonstrate proficient knowledge about the Pacific Ocean such as size, temperature, and location.

  2. Demonstrate proficient knowledge about whales and dolphins such as size, visible characteristics, and what they eat.

Essential Questions:

What is the size of the Pacific Ocean in relation to the other four oceans?

What is the temperature of the Pacific Ocean in relation to the other four oceans?

Where are whales and dolphins found?

What are some characteristics of whales?

What are some characteristics of dolphins?


Essential Vocabulary:


  • Dolphin

  • Echolocation

  • Ocean

  • Whale


Materials:

  • Globe

  • Stonehouse, B. (1998). Animal watch: a visual introduction to whales, dolphins, and porpoises. New York: Checkmark Books.

  • paper and pencil

  • stapler and staples

  • newspaper

  • paint and paint brushes

  • Ocean Wonder journals

  • Smart board with Pacific Ocean facts

Procedures:

Introduction (10 minutes):




  1. Ask the students to apply the knowledge they gained in the oceans lesson to apply to this lesson by identifying where the Pacific Ocean is located.

  2. Using smart board technology, discuss characteristics of the Pacific Ocean (t is the largest ocean and it has warm water).

  3. Continue building upon the mind-map idea and let the students brainstorm animals that might live in the Pacific Ocean.

  4. Draw or show pictures of a snail and a whale on opposite sides

of the chalkboard. Have the students name an animal that is smaller than a

whale, yet bigger than a snail. Draw it between the two. Create a picture list.

Instructional Activities (30 minutes):


  1. Explain to the children that they are going to go on a whale watch.

  2. Conduct a read aloud activity with the book Animal watch: a visual introduction to whales, dolphins, and porpoises.

  3. While reading the book aloud, ask the children questions about each type of whale and dolphin. Some of these questions will include the following: What is this size of this animal? What does this animal eat? What does this animal look like?

Closing Activities (25 minutes):




  1. Help students create a 3-D whale or dolphin by drawing a whale

or dolphin on a sheet of paper. Cut it out and trace it onto another sheet of

paper. Cut out the shape, and then partially staple the two shapes together.

Stuff with newspaper and finish stapling, then paint.


  1. Have the students write three sentences explaining their whale watching experience in their ocean wonder journals.

  2. During the closing activities, have sounds of whales playing in the background.


Evaluation:

The instrument used for evaluation will be a teacher-constructed true/false test to determine the student’s comprehension of the material taught. See appendices.



Accommodations for Special students:

Some accommodations for ESL students are as follows: use visual aids, introduce key vocabulary prior to lesson and write the vocabulary on the board, allow for extended time on assignments and grade only what has been completed, provide peer tutoring, and draw ESL students gradually into class discussions.



Enrichment:

If students finish early, they can cut, paste, and color whale and dolphin worksheets.



Appendices:

True/False Test Questions



  1. The Pacific Ocean is the largest ocean on Earth.

  2. The Pacific Ocean water is warm.

  3. Whales are small.

  4. Dolphins are big.

  5. There are many types of whales and dolphins.

  6. Whales and dolphins communicate through echolocation.

Bibliography


Interesting Ocean Facts. (2006). Retrieved June 22, 2009, from http://www.savethesea.org/STS%20ocean_facts.htm
The Living Ocean. (2008, September). Scholastic News, 77(2), L2-L3.  Retrieved June 24, 2009, from Research Library database. (Document ID: 1558343621).
Col, J. (2009). All About Oceans and Seas. Retrieved June, 25, 2009, from http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/ocean/
Polar Bear. (1996-2009). Retrieved June 25, 2009, from http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/polar-bear.html
Patent, D.  (2000). Polar Bears.  Minneapolis: Carolrhoda Books.
Pacific Ocean. (2004). Retrieved June 26, 2009, from http://www.ocean.udel.edu/extreme2004/mission/divelocation/pacific.html
Spilsbury, R., & Spilsbury, L.  (Eds.).  (2004). A school of dolphins.  Chicago, IL: Heinemann.
Stonehouse, B. (1998). Animal watch: a visual introduction to whales, dolphins, and porpoises. New York: Checkmark Books.
Rillero, P. (2001). Science projects and activities. Lincolnwood, IL: Publications International, Ltd.
O”Hair, M. (2003). Lesson Plan. Retrieved July 1, 2009, from http://www.franklincollege.edu/pwp/mohair/Oceans%20lesson.pdf
Stone, L. (1998). Penguins. Minneapolis, MN: Lerner Publications Company.
Taylor, L. (1998). Jellyfish. Minneapolis, MN: Lerner Publications Company.
Lepthien, E. (1996). Sea Turtles. New York: Children’s Press.
McGovern, A. (1995). Questions and answers about sharks. New York: Scholastic.

de Beer, H.  (2004). Little Polar Bear.  New York: North-South Books.
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