Cuap proposal-New Qualification/Subject/Endorsement 2014



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2. UC/14 MCALL/1


University of Canterbury

Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha


CUAP Proposal-New Qualification/Subject/Endorsement 2014

Section A


Proposal Description

Purpose of the proposal

To introduce a new degree of Master of Computer-Assisted Language Learning (MCALL).



Justification

The Master of Computer-Assisted Language Learning (MCALL) is proposed as a 180-point, one-year professional Master qualification whose graduates will be technologically knowledgeable and skilful language educators for a wide variety of settings in New Zealand and beyond. The proposed programme is expected to contribute to the UC goal of attracting more international students as well as to the goal of increasing the awareness of the use of technology in education. It will be of interest to two separate groups of potential participants. The first group is NZ language educators, who, with the Government’s massive investment in connectivity for schools and other education settings, suddenly will have access to high-speed uncapped Internet connectivity and need to know how to use it in a pedagogically justified manner to enhance their teaching and their students’ learning. The second group is teachers of English and other languages throughout the world who want and need to develop their language teaching with digital technology. This second group, international students who will be able to take this programme online, are a new group who can be attracted to study at UC through this programme. This is a focussed programme of the kind mentioned in the UC Strategic Plan 2011-2013 meeting the Challenge strand. To cater to the needs of these two groups of students, the programme is designed with three possible entry points: in July, our Semester 2, to align with the beginning of the northern-hemisphere academic year; January (Summer session 2); and February, our Semester 1, to cater to the needs of domestic students.

Graduates of the programme will have the knowledge and skills they require to be able to judiciously introduce technology-enhanced learning of languages in a variety of educational settings from early childhood to tertiary. As education settings and the wider community gain unprecedented access to connectivity and technology, the challenge is the increased need for educators who are able to use the technology to enhance learning. There is a demand from educators in the English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) area in NZ for knowledge about and skills in the use of technology. Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages Aotearoa New Zealand (TESOLANZ) invited the proposing staff member as the guest speaker at their AGM this year, and this was followed by requests to present to other groups of ESOL educators in Canterbury and Nelson. There are no Master programmes dedicated to technology-enhanced language learning in New Zealand, and only a handful worldwide, e.g. at the University of Essex in the UK, The University of Melbourne in Australia and The Monterey Institute of International Studies in California, USA where CALL is offered as a specialisation. There is a postgraduate course at 500-level titled Issues in Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) (not being offered in 2014) at the University of Waikato and another one Computer-assisted Language Learning at Victoria University.

The field of CALL and the pedagogically sound application of technology in language education have great potential in New Zealand and beyond, and this programme complements the existing Postgraduate Diploma in Education endorsements in e-Learning and Digital Technologies, and in Teaching and Learning Languages. As a 180-point one-year master programme, the MCALL is a professional master qualification expected to attract practicing educators who wish to develop their knowledge and skills in technology-enhanced language learning. For any students who wish to shift to a 240 pt MEd there is the possibility of leaving the programme with a PGDipEd and then adding courses in Research Methods and a thesis. The PGCertEd is another possible early exit point for students who embark on the MCALL, but do not wish to complete.

The two new courses in technology-enhanced language learning in the MCALL programme are expected to be attractive as stand-alone courses for professional development, and could also be taken by students in the MEd or PGDipEd. One of the new courses, Issues in Technology-Enhanced Language Learning, is proposed to include a miniMOOC (a free open online course), running in the first part of the summer (November-December) with web-based lectures from UC staff and guest lecturers, some of which will be developed as Open Educational Resources (OERs). These lectures can also serve as tasters to attract regular students to begin the programme the following July. The programme and its courses are relevant for educators working in all kinds of language development settings in New Zealand and internationally, including international languages, ESOL, early childhood education (regarding first and second language development), heritage languages including Pasifika languages, and Māori language education. The proposal will enhance the e-learning profile of the College of Education and the School of Teacher Education, and generate content (e.g. a library of web-based lectures and guest lectures as open educational resources) that may complement and enhance some aspects of ITE programmes, thus answering to the Challenge component of the Statement of Strategic Intent.

The programme fits the teaching and research specifications of available staff in the College of Education and elsewhere in the University and can be expected to result in research output from staff involved in the programme as the team teaching into the programme grows with student numbers. The programme will involve cross-UC collaboration and expertise, as the programme includes an option where students can select from appropriate courses for which they are eligible in languages and linguistics as well as in education, thus addressing the Concentrate component of the Statement of Strategic Intent. Because the programme is closely involved with practitioners and their settings, it will answer to the Connect component of the Statement of Strategic Intent.

Qualification

The programme meets the CUAP definition of a master’s degree. It builds on a teaching qualification, so the minimum entry qualification is a three-year bachelor’s degree or an equivalent qualification, completed at a specified minimum level of attainment. The programme comprises 180 points, at least 60 of these at level 9, the remainder at level 8. The degree is achieved through coursework consisting of courses, project work and research in varying combinations.

Acceptability of the programme and consultation

The proposal was sent to the following individuals and organisations for critical examination. Their comments are available on request and were taken into consideration in this document

  • NZ Association of Language Teachers (NZALT), Michelle Pinkney, Canterbury NZALT, Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages Aotearoa New Zealand (TESOLANZ), Rosemary Alison, CANTESOL, Richard von Sturmer, Ministry of Education, Mark Hornby, Head of Department of Humanities, Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT), Glenys Bagnall, Principal of Christchurch College of English Language, Anne Jacques, Head of Department of Languages, Riccarton High School, Angela Bland, Head of Department of ESOL, Riccarton High School, Phil Holstein, Principal of Riccarton High School, Phil Tappenden, Principal of Kirkwood Intermediate, Geoff Moore, Director of Education Plus, Current and past domestic and international postgraduate students in Education at the UC College of Education.

  • Colleagues at other universities:

    • Dr Margaret Franken, Chair of Arts and Language Education, University of Waikato, Dr Marcia Johnson, Director, Centre for Tertiary Teaching & Learning, Faculty of Education, University of Waikato, Dr Christine Ericsdotter, Dr Tore Nilsson, Dr Rakel Österberg Prof., Camilla Bardel, Stockholm University, Sweden, Prof. Barbara Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk, Prof. dr. hab. Przemek Krakowian, University of Lodz, Poland

  • UC internal consultation:

    • Erin Jackson, UCSA President, Prof. Beth Hume, Department Coordinator of the Department of Linguistics, Prof Tanja Mitrovic, Head of Department, Computer Science and Software Engineering, Susan Bouterey, Head of the School of Languages and Cultures

    • Library staff at the Education and main libraries;

      • Peter Lund, Academic Liaison Manager, Patricia Jordan, Liaison Librarian for Linguistics, Kathryn Andrews and Kim Allan, Liaison Librarians for Education, Aurelia Arona, Liaison Librarian for Māori

  • College internal consultation:

  • Prof. Letitia Fickel, Head of School of Teacher Education, Dr Ronnie Davey, Deputy Head of School of Teacher Education, Prof. John Everatt, MEd Coordinator, Dr Julie Mackey, Academic Dean of Education and Programme Coordinator for the Postgraduate Diploma in Education endorsement in e-Learning and Digital Technologies, Prof. Niki Davis, acting PVC for Education and Director of UC e-Learning lab

Treaty of Waitangi

The proposal has been discussed by, and comments received from, Liz Brown, Kaiārahi Māori at the College of Education and the Māori & Bicultural Committee (details available on request). These comments and suggestions have been incorporated in this proposal. The programme is expected to be of interest to New Zealand teachers in early childhood, primary and secondary settings where te reo Māori is taught and learned, and the occurrence of technology-enhanced language learning in these settings is highly relevant to the programme.

Goals of the programme

The aim of the programme is to prepare participants for the design and implementation of technology-enhanced language learning in a variety of language learning contexts. Participants will develop a critical awareness and understanding of the principles of teaching with digital tools and materials and of second language acquisition and how these can be applied in learning environments. Participants will be able to focus on technology-enhanced language learning as an object of inquiry through critical discussion of current research.

Outcome statement

Education pathways: This is a taught Master programme. As such it does not have a thesis component. This means that graduates of this programme who wish to continue study at the doctoral level may need to take additional courses and are advised to consult with College of Education study advisors on how to proceed.

Employment pathways: Graduates are able to design and implement programmes of language learning and teaching including the judicious use of digital tools and materials for language learning in a variety of learning environments, depending on the existing teaching qualification and experience of the graduate.

The degree will meet the NZQA definition for a Master’s degree with 60 credits at level 9 (the new course Issues in technology-enhanced language learning and a new level 9 course replacing the existing course EDEM632) and the remaining 120 credits at level 8.



University graduate characteristics and Qualification graduate profile

Graduate profile: Graduates from the programme will have knowledge of the history and current state of technology-enhanced language learning and of theories and practices in second language acquisition and in language teaching and learning. They will understand the affordances and constraints of digital tools and materials for language learning and critically evaluate the role these play in a variety of language learning contexts. Graduates will be able to design and implement language learning activities, experiences, lessons, units and courses including the judicious application of technology where appropriate. They will further be able to critically evaluate and advise on the application of existing and continuously emerging technology in learning environments.

The expected juxtaposition and contact between international and domestic students in the programme will provide a global context and experience for all participants. Graduates of this programme will have enhanced employability in digitally prepared education settings and they will be welcomed as innovators and entrepreneurs who can bring their skills and knowledge to learning environments. Expertise in technology-enhanced language learning means that graduates will be able to create learning opportunities for language learning, linking learners with competent speakers of target languages even in geographically remote communities.



Programme overview

The programme is open to students who have completed any kind of teacher education and who meet the general prerequisites for master courses at the University of Canterbury. The programme consists of 180 points of study in five compulsory 30-point courses, and one other 30-point course from language education or e-Learning, or other relevant courses in consultation with the Programme Coordinator. Students on this programme will apply a professional technology-enhanced language learning focus to their assignments in all their courses. The programme is usually completed in twelve months, though part-time study is possible. The courses are:



  • Semester 2 (July-November)

    • EDEM633 Foundations of technology-enhanced language learning (new level-8, 30-point course)

    • EDEM631 Foundations of Language Acquisition and Learning (on campus and online) (30 points)

  • Summer session 1 (November-December)

    • EDMM633 Issues in technology-enhanced language learning (new level-9, 30-point course)

  • Summer session 2 (January-February)

    • Optional course (30 points, level 8 or 9)

  • Semester 1 (February-June)

    • EDEM627 e-Learning and Pedagogy: Effective Strategies for the Classroom (30 points)

    • EDMM632 Issues in Language Acquisition and Learning (new level-9, 30-point course).

Proposed teaching/delivery methods

There is some flexibility in the order of courses, which means that the programme can be started in July, January or February. The programme is offered online, though some of the courses may also have campus occurrences. The courses generally involve active participation in online or face-to-face real-time classes. Online students may in some cases participate in the campus classes via e.g. Skype or Adobe Connect.



Prescriptions for courses

The new courses to be introduced with this qualification are:



EDEM633 Foundations of Technology-Enhanced Language Learning 30 points 0.25 EFTS

Participants will gain a comprehensive overview of the field of technology-enhanced language learning and develop an ability to select, evaluate and create digital tools for language learning in a variety of learning contexts. This compulsory course presents the history and development of technology-enhanced language learning and students learn about the affordances and constraints of a wide variety of digital tools and materials and how they can be used in a pedagogically appropriate way to enhance language learning as well as creating materials for technology-enhanced language learning in a particular context.

P: Subject to approval of the Head of School

RP: Participants should have previously studied a language or completed teacher education or have experience teaching languages (including ESOL), and familiarity with a range of digital technologies.

EDEM633-15S2 (D) Semester 2
EDMM633 Issues in Technology-Enhanced Language Learning 30 points 0.25 EFTS

The course will deal with current issues in technology-enhanced language learning research, including but not limited to gaming in language learning, teacher education for technology-enhanced language learning, corpora in language learning, technology-enhanced language assessment and the flipped language classroom, digital materials and tools for language learning. Participants will research and critically analyse problematic aspects of technology-enhanced language learning research and discuss their application to classroom practices and problems in a particular educational setting.

P: Subject to approval of the Head of School

RP: EDEM633 Foundations of Technology-Enhanced Language Learning or have equivalent knowledge. Participants should have previously studied a language or completed teacher education or have experience teaching languages (including ESOL), and familiarity with a range of digital technologies.

EDMM633-15SU2 (D) Summer School
EDMM632 Issues in Language Acquisition and Learning 30 points 0.25 EFTS

Students will investigate and critically analyse aspects of language acquisition and learning research and consider their relevance to practices and problems in a particular educational setting.

P: Subject to approval of the Head of School

RP: EDEM631 Foundations of Language Acquisition and Learning or have equivalent knowledge.Participants should have previously studied a language or completed teacher education or have experience teaching languages (including ESOL).

EDMM632-16S1 (D) Semester 1

Assessment and moderation procedures

The courses will be assessed variously by take-home exams, written assignments (including lesson and unit plans, material evaluation, policy documents, learner language assessments, descriptive reviews of learning and teaching contexts, and reports of field studies carried out in learning environments), oral presentations and teaching resources and tasks. Participants are required to write reflections and to participate in discussions with fellow students and to give and receive peer feedback on coursework. The course assessments will be subject to the standard moderation processes within the College of Education as per section 6 of the University of Canterbury Assessment Policy.



Resources

Expertise: Associate Prof Una Cunningham has expertise in technology-enhanced language education and will coordinate the programme and the two new courses, Foundations of technology-enhanced language learning and Issues in technology-enhanced language learning as well as the existing language education courses EDEM631 and the level 9 course that will replace EDEM632. She will be joined in teaching this by Jocelyn Howard and other College of Education staff. Prof Niki Davis is course coordinator for the existing-learning course EDEM627.

Physical facilities: This programme requires standard facilities for online teaching, namely office space and access to Adobe Connect and Skype, as well as Learn.

Equipment: Existing equipment will be used, but will need to be updated continuously. The programme will require the development of web-based mini-lectures and demonstrations, which will require the continuous updating of software on staff computers

Library resources: Liaison Librarian Kathryn Andrews gave the following information:

The library already has the resources to support the Postgraduate Diploma in Education (e-Learning and Digital Technologies in Education) and Postgraduate Diploma in Education (Teaching and Learning Languages). Many of the resources for these two PG Diplomas will also be of relevance to the proposed MCALL qualification. In addition, the Library has three academic journals specifically targeting this topic: ReCALL [electronic resource], Latin American journal of content & language integrated learning [electronic resource] and Computer assisted language learning [electronic resource]. These journals are online, so suit the distance delivery framework. None of the three have embargoes on recent content.

The library has 51 journals on the general topic of computer assisted instruction and nearly 300 book titles.

A search on the library search engine ‘MultiSearch’ for  ‘computer assisted language learning’ retrieved over 82,000 results comprising articles, books, book chapters, conference papers and dissertations amongst the results, of which early 29,00 are scholarly articles.  Similarly, a search for ‘language education theory’ retrieved over 750,000 results of which nearly half are scholarly journal articles.

Computer databases will give students technical literature from the computing field. Examples are:  ACM guide to computing literature (Computer science, information technology literature), ACM digital library (Full text of every article ever published by ACM and bibliographic citations from major publishers in computing) and Lecture Notes in Computer Science (reports the latest results from all areas of computer science and information technology research, development and education).

Relevant resources will also be discoverable on the Education databases: Education Research Complete (world's largest and most complete collection of full text education journals it  covers areas of curriculum instruction as well as administration, policy, funding, and related social issues), ERIC (Education Resources Information Center) covers Education related literature, and both the Australian (literature relevant to Australian education) and British (all aspects and fields of education from preschool to adult and higher education) Education Indexes (for non-USA material).  New Zealand article information can be sourced from Index New Zealand as well as the international databases.



Research regarding Maori language education can be supported by resources held in the collection and by the Maori Liaison Librarian based at the Education Library. Similarly, Pasifika languages can be supported by resources held and by the Pasifika subject librarian based at the Macmillan Brown Library. It must be noted that the amount of research in these areas may be limited.

UC strengths in related disciplines: This programme draws together existing expertise in language education and e-learning, which was identified some time ago as a new and emerging area for the College. There are good opportunities to link research and teaching both within this programme and into the ITE courses and programmes.

Plans for monitoring programme quality

As well as formal and informal evaluation of the programme’s courses by students and teaching staff, programme evaluation will take place according to the relevant Review of Programmes Policy. A small monitoring group comprised of the Programme coordinator, other course coordinators, the Associate Dean of Postgraduate Studies in Education or a deputy and a student representative will collect and analyse information in respect of student numbers, pass rates, retention and student satisfaction for annual self-review reports and the Graduating Year Review.

Review of the programme

Within three years of the first cohort of students graduating from the new qualification, a Graduating Year Review (GYR) will be conducted to ensure that delivery of the qualification has met the goals of the original proposal. Subsequently a Programme Review will be carried out at least every five years to confirm the integrity of the programme and the qualification; to identify areas for change, improvement and areas of good practice; to ensure the qualification meets national and international standards for comparable qualifications in the same or comparable disciplines; and to ensure (where appropriate) that the programme and the qualification satisfy professional expectations.

Statement re Section B

Section B has been prepared and will be made available to CUAP on request.

Proposed new regulations and prescriptions (use the Calendar Form at the end of Section A)


For New Qualifications – TEC/NZQA/UNZ Requirements

EFTS value of qualification: 1.5

NZSCED code: 070130 Teacher Professional Development


NZQA exit level of qualification to go on the New Zealand Qualifications Framework: Level 9

Statement regarding funding: The qualification meets the criteria to be fully funded at the postgraduate level

Memorandum of understanding: n/a



Duration of the Qualification-NZQF requirement


Minimum number of points to complete the qualification: 180

Vacation/recess weeks: As of UC Academic Year

Work experience/placement hours per week: 0

Tuition/teaching (full-time equivalent) weeks (including exam and study weeks): 42 weeks in total: 36 teaching weeks and 6 study weeks) (for 2015: Weeks 2-7, 8-13, 17-22, 28-33, 36-41, 46-51. Weeks 23-25 and 42-44 are study weeks)

Teaching hours per week: 6 hours per teaching week

Self-directed learning hours per week: 37 hours

Calendar Form


New Qualification Regulations

UC Calendar 2014 Page 155

Insert:
The Degree of Master of Computer-Assisted Language Learning (MCALL)
1. Qualifications Required to Enrol in the Degree

Every candidate for the Degree of Master of Computer-Assisted Language Learning shall have:

(a) either

i. qualified for any appropriate degree in New Zealand and either:

a. successfully completed a recognised teacher training course of not less than one year at a New Zealand college of education or university;

b. or acquired experience as a teacher in a recognised educational institution or setting;

c. or acquired appropriate experience as an educator in a work-place or community setting;

d. or completed a qualifying course; or

ii. been admitted under the Regulations for admission ad eundem statum as entitled to enrol for the Degree of Master of Computer-Assisted Language Learning; and

(b) been approved as a candidate for the Degree by the Dean of Education.



Notes:

1. The relevance and standard of undergraduate studies and any subsequent professional work experience are the main criteria of approval. Students will normally be expected to have at least a B average in their 300-level courses.

2. Structure of the Degree

(a) The course of study for the Degree of Master of Computer-Assisted Language Learning shall comprise courses equivalent to 1.5 EFTS (180 points) set out in the Schedule to these Regulations.



Note: A candidate wishing to enrol in a thesis for the Master of Education following the award of this degree should note that completing 0.25 EFTS (30 points) of approved research methodology courses will normally be required.

3. Courses from other Masters or Honours Degrees

A candidate may, with the approval of the Programme Coordinator, the Dean of Education and the Head of the other Department/School concerned, replace up to 0.25 EFTS (30 points) with relevant courses at an equivalent level.



4. Approval of Course of Study

The course of study of each candidate is subject to the approval of the Programme Coordinator and the Dean of Education. The qualifications and experience of the candidate will be taken into account in approving the course of study.



5. Time Limits for Full-time and Part-time

(a) A candidate may be enrolled as a full-time or part-time candidate.

(b) A part-time candidate is one who, because of employment, health, family or other reasons, is unable to study full-time.

(c) The minimum period of enrolment for a full-time candidate is one year. The maximum period of enrolment for a part-time candidate is four years from the year of first enrolment.

(d) To qualify for the award of the Degree all requirements must be completed within the time limits listed above, unless the candidate is granted an extension of time by the Dean of Education because of special circumstances.

6. Re-enrolling in Courses

A candidate who fails one course for the Degree of Master of Computer-Assisted Language Learning may re-enrol in that course in only one subsequent year. Candidates may not fail more than one course.



7. Transfer from MCALL to PGCertEd, PGDipEd or MED

With the approval of the Dean of Education a candidate may elect to have courses passed for the Master of Computer-Assisted Language Learning transferred to a Postgraduate Certificate in Education, Postgraduate Diploma in Education or Master of Education in lieu of being awarded the Master of Computer-Assisted Language Learning, provided that the candidate meets the eligibility criteria and regulations, including completion timeframes, of that qualification.



8. Transfer from PGCertEd, PGDipEd or MED to MCALL

With the approval of the Dean of Education a candidate may elect to have appropriate courses passed for the Postgraduate Certificate in Education, Postgraduate Diploma in Education or Master of Education transferred to the Master of Computer-Assisted Language Learning in lieu of being awarded that qualification, provided that the candidate meets the eligibility criteria and regulations, including completion timeframes, of the degree of Master of Computer-Assisted Language Learning.



9. Degree with Distinction

On the recommendation of the Dean of Education the Degree of Master of Computer-Assisted Language Learning may be awarded with Distinction. Distinction is equivalent to First Class Honours and will be awarded to students achieving a GPA of at least 7.



Schedule to the Regulations for the Degree of Master of Computer-Assisted Language Learning

For full course information, go to www.canterbury.ac.nz/courses

Required courses:

EDEM 627 e-Learning and Pedagogy: Effective Strategies for the Classroom

EDEM 631 Foundations of Language Acquisition and Learning

EDEM 633 Foundations of Technology-Enhanced Language Learning

EDMM 632 Issues in Language Acquisition and Learning

EDMM 633 Issues in Technology-Enhanced Language Learning



Optional courses:

At least 30 points at Level 8 or Level 9 in appropriate courses to be selected in consultation with the Programme Coordinator.






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