Date: 7/20/11 Subject/Class



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James Madison University – College of Education

Social Studies Lesson Plan Format
Name: ______Deborah Christakos_ Date: ___7/20/11__________

Subject/Class: ____USI-History__ Grade Level: ___6____ Topic: __Major Bodies of Water_

NCSS Theme #_3__ : __People, Places and Environments_

Subthemes: # _Processes_ : _Ask and find answers to geographic questions related to the school, community, state, region, and world___; #___ : _________________________

(Remember NCSS is focused on Knowledge, Process and Product—be specific)

 

Essential Questions/Big Ideas: What are the major bodies of water in the United States?

What are some ways bodies of water in the United States have supported interaction among regions and created links to other areas?
SOLs/Standards addressed:

USI.2c: locate and identify the water features important to the early history of the United States:

Great Lakes, Mississippi River, Missouri River, Ohio River, Columbia River, Colorado River, Rio Grande, St. Lawrence River, Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, and Gulf of Mexico
Learning Outcomes/Objectives:

1. Students will be able to differentiate between an ocean, river, lake and gulf.

2. Students will be able to place the Great Lakes, Mississippi River, Missouri River, Ohio River, Columbia River, Colorado River, Rio Grande, St. Lawrence River, Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, and Gulf of Mexico on a map correctly.

3. Students will be able to explain why the body of water was important for trade, transportation, exploration, or settlement.



Assessment alignment chart: How will you know they know the objectives listed above?


Objective

Assessment (formative and summative)


U 1: SWBAT … differentiate between an ocean, river, lake and gulf.



Formative: students will draw pictures of each and label them.

Summative: this will be on the Unit test as multiple choice.

U2: SWBAT … place the Great Lakes, Mississippi River, Missouri River, Ohio River, Columbia River, Colorado River, Rio Grande, St. Lawrence River, Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, and Gulf of Mexico on a map correctly.


Formative: 1. Students will label all water features by name on a map. 2. With a blank map of the US the students will draw and label all water features. 3. Students will break into teams and using the overhead with a map of the water features the students will fill them in for the “best time”.

Summative: This will be on the Unit test as a map that students will need to label.

U3: SWBAT … explain why the body of water was important for trade, transportation, exploration, or settlement.



Formative: The students will make their own Fortune Cookie activity and use it to review.

Summative: This will be on the Unit test as either matching or fill in the blank.









Background Content Outline:


  1. Major bodies of water

  1. Oceans

  1. Atlantic

  2. Pacific

  1. Rivers

  1. Mississippi

  2. Missouri

  3. Ohio

  4. Columbia

  5. Colorado

  6. Rio Grande

  7. St. Lawrence

  1. Lakes

  1. Great Lakes

  1. Gulf

  1. Gulf of Mexico

  1. Trade, transportation, and settlement

  1. The location of the United States, with its Atlantic and Pacific coasts, has provided access to other areas of the world.

  2. The Atlantic Ocean served as the highway for explorers, early settlers, and later immigrants.

  3. The Ohio River was the gateway to the west.

  4. Inland port cities grew in the Midwest along the Great Lakes.

  5. The Mississippi and Missouri Rivers were the transportation arteries for farm and were used to transport farm and industrial products. They were links to ports and other parts of the world.

  6. The Columbia River was explored by Lewis and Clark.

  7. The Colorado River was explored by the Spanish.

  8. The Rio Grande forms the border with Mexico.

  9. The Pacific Ocean was an early exploration route destination.

  10. The Gulf of Mexico provided the French and Spanish with exploration routes to Mexico and other parts of America.

  11. The St. Lawrence River forms part of the northeastern border with Canada and connects the Great Lakes to the Atlantic Ocean.

DEAN CHART

Concept word

D=define

E=examples

A=attributes

N=non-examples

gulf

A large body of water surrounded by land on three sides

Gulf of Mexico

Water, one side open

Atlantic Ocean

river

A large stream of water that empties into either an ocean, gulf, sea, or another river

Mississippi River, Ohio River

Long stream of water, flows into larger body of water

Gulf of Mexico

ocean



A large body of salt water that encompasses almost 75% of the earths surface

Atlantic or Pacific Ocean

Large bodies of water between Continents, has waves

Lake Superior

lake

A body of water that can be either salt or fresh water that is surrounded by land.

Lake Michigan, Erie, Superior

Land on all sides, can be big or small

Mississippi River


Instructional Plan:





What the Teacher Will Do

What the Students Will Do

Warm-up

10-15 minutes.



Teacher will post the question on the board “What is an ocean, lake, river, and gulf? Name some oceans, rivers, gulfs, and lakes that you know of (they do not have to be in the US). Make a quick outline of the United States and draw and label and oceans, lakes, rivers, and gulfs that you know.

In their notebook the students will define ocean, lake, river, and gulf. They will make and outline of the US and draw and label all oceans, rivers, lakes, and gulfs that they know.

Vanna White activity

10-15 minutes



The teacher will pass out a map of the US for the students to fill in with the major bodies of water. When the students have done all they can the teacher will pull down the map of the US that shows all the water elements and the students one at a time will show on the map (with a flourishing hand) the Great Lakes, Mississippi River, Missouri River, Ohio River, Columbia River, Colorado River, Rio Grande, St. Lawrence River, Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, and Gulf of Mexico. The teacher will direct the students to fill in their maps as each body of water is shown on the map.

The students will be given a map of the US and be ready to fill it in with all major bodies of water. The students will then come to the map of the United States in the front of the room and show on the map where the Great Lakes, Mississippi River, Missouri River, Ohio River, Columbia River, Colorado River, Rio Grande, St. Lawrence River, Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, and Gulf of Mexico are. As the students show each body of water the students will fill in their map.

Discussion and Notes

20-25 minutes



Teacher will make 2 columns on the board and label them1) bodies of water and 2) Trade, Transportation, and Settlement. Starting with the Atlantic Ocean the teacher will discuss with the students why the Atlantic was important. Once the teacher and students decide why the Atlantic was important, the teacher will write in the second column: provided access to other areas of the world and was highway for explorers, early settlers, and later immigrants. The teacher will do these one at a time and stop after each to let the students copy information.

Students will go to the note section of their notebook and on a page of loose leaf paper they will make two columns and label them 1) bodies of water and 2) Trade, Transportation, and Settlement. After discussion of each body of water and its importance the students will write the information from the board onto their papers.

Fortune Cookie Project

40 minutes



The teacher will give each student 11 precut circles, 11 rectangular labels, 11 rectangular slips of paper precut to fit in the circle when it is folded, a stapler, and a Ziploc bag. The students will be instructed to fold the circles in half and staple the rounded edge (one staple only). They will then be instructed to write the names of each body of water onto the 11 labels and stick them onto the semi-circles they made. They are then to write down the information from the Trade, Transportation, and Settlement column onto each of the 11 precut slips of paper. They can then put them in the bag, shake it up, and put the rectangular sheet of paper (fortune) through the semicircle (cookie) that it defines. The teacher will check to make sure that the students have them correct (formative assessment) and they are to take them home and review.

The students will each get 11 precut circles, 11 rectangular labels, 11 rectangular slips of paper precut to fit in the circle when it is folded, a stapler, and a Ziploc bag. The students will fold the circles in half and staple the rounded edge (one staple only). They will then write the names of each body of water onto the 11 labels (one body of water for each) and stick them onto the semi-circles they made. They are then to write down the information from the Trade, Transportation, and Settlement column onto each of the 11 precut slips of paper. They will then put them in the bag, shake it up, and put the rectangular sheet of paper (fortune) through the semicircle (cookie) that it defines. They are to take them home and review.

Wrap-up

10-15 minutes



Teacher will project map onto the whiteboard that will include all bodies of water outlined but not labeled. The teacher will choose a student to go the whiteboard and label one body of water and then explain its importance. The student will than hand the marker to another student who will do the same thing and the process will be repeated for all of the bodies of water. (This can be done in teams or just as explained above)

Students will go up to whiteboard which has a map projected on it with all the bodies of water studied. They will than one by one label each body of water and explain its importance to the whole class.


Materials Needed for the Lesson: pencil, paper, colored pencils, overhead projector, white board, markers, handout of maps with rivers drawn in, large map of bodies of water, precut circles, rectangular labels, precut rectangular slips of paper, baggies, stapler
Bibliography/Resources Used (using APA):
Adaption/Differentiation:

ELL/struggling readers

Each students after doing both the map activity and notes will get a copy of each to make sure they cannot only read them, but also to make sure they have all relevant information. It is possible for these students to only do 5 or 6 of their fortune cookies and have the other 5 or 6 premade so they have the experience of making them but do not feel pressured into keeping up.

ADHD

Students will be up and down most of the class and activities will switch as quickly as possible. I find if they are doing a hands on activity they are able to stay on task for a longer period of time.

Gifted

Allow these students to help other students who may be having a hard time with the fortune cookie activity. For the Wrap up if done in game form, these students can be the captains of each team.


Explanation of Instructional Strategies Used:

Visual: Using maps to see exactly where each body of water is. Notes are written on the board for the students to see before they write.

Kinesthetic: The fortune cookie project, the Vanna White project, and the wrap up all use hands on activity.

Verbal: Students will discuss the importance of the bodies of water in both the note exercise and the wrap up exercise.

Dept. of Middle, Secondary, and Math Education

modified by Dr. Cude & Dr. Stern 8/10






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