Engl e-129 Shakespeare After All: The Later Plays Professor Marjorie Garber Fall 2007



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ENGL E-129
Shakespeare After All:

The Later Plays
Professor Marjorie Garber

Fall 2007

Wednesday, 5:30-7:30 p.m.



Contacts:
Melissa (Mel) Pino, Head TF: pino@fas.harvard.edu

    Lawrence (Larry) Switzy, TF: switzky@fas.harvard.edu

TFs will hold office hours before class on Wednesdays, 4:30-5:30. For the distance students, “office” hours will be available via phone or email. For all administrative concerns, please contact Mel, even if she is not your assigned T.F.


Required texts:
The Norton Shakespeare (or another scholarly modern edition)

Garber, Shakespeare After All


Weekly assignment: Both the play and its corresponding chapter in Shakespeare After All should be read before attending or viewing the lecture/discussion session for that play. The material in Shakespeare After All is supplementary to what will be covered in the lecture session.

September: Wed 19 Introduction

Wed 26 Troilus and Cressida


October: Wed 3 Measure for Measure
Wed 10 Othello



Wed 17 King Lear
Mon 22 First Paper Due by 5:00 p.m. EST
Wed 24 Macbeth
Wed 31 Antony and Cleopatra
November: Wed 7 Midterm Exam



Wed 14 Coriolanus
Wed 21 Thanksgiving holiday—NO CLASS
Wed 28 Pericles
December Wed 5 Cymbeline

Wed 12 The Winter’s Tale


Wed 19 Second Paper Due by 5:00 p.m. EST

The Tempest
January Wed 2 Plenary/Review session

Wed 9 Final Exam


**Videos of the weekly lecture/discussion sessions will be available 24 to 48 hours after the date listed on the syllabus.
Grade Distribution: First Paper 20%, Second Paper 30%, Midterm 20%, Final 30%?
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**PLEASE NOTE WELL: Without exception, late assignments that are not excused by written documentation of illness or other emergency will be docked 1/3 letter grade for every day they are late. For example, the first paper is due on Monday, October 22 An unexcused late paper turned in on Wednesday, October 24 that would have merited an A will drop down to a B+.
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ALL ASSIGNMENTS must be completed in order to pass the course.

Class Participation: As class sessions will be structured to incorporate discussion, and will welcome questions from students as the basis of that discussion, we urge “local” and “hybrid” students to attend sessions in person. Although participation will not be factored into the final grade for the course, we strongly advise all students—“local,” “hybrid,” and “distance”—to make use of the web board to post comments and questions. While individual concerns and personal matters will be handled via email or phone, all questions and comments about the course materials—including the play texts, Shakespeare After All, and lecture/discussion sessions—should be addressed through the web board, where Larry and Mel will answer questions and chime in. The purpose of this board is to foster an online community in which “local” and “distance” students can carry on a conversation about the plays. While it will not be possible for the TF’s to respond to each individual posting, we will select postings to be addressed in the lecture session, allowing distance students to have a voice in the class discussion.

**You will need a functioning HUID and PIN number in order to gain access to the discussion board and the university’s online resources (discussed below). Larry and Mel cannot provide assistance for PIN problems—please call the Extension School if you are experiencing difficulty.



Graduate Student Requirements: graduate students must (1) take the midterm and the final and (2) turn in a researched 15-page paper in lieu of the 2 undergraduate papers, due Wednesday, Dec. 19th. The paper should demonstrate comparative research on its topic that situates the topic and the paper’s argument within the context of current published Shakespeare criticism and scholarship. It must therefore be properly foot-noted or end-noted and must include a bibliography or a list of "works cited" (this in addition to the 15 pages of text). Students will schedule a conversation with one of the TFs about topics prior to commencing work on the paper. For local students, these conversations may happen over email or in person; for distance students, conversations may take place via email or phone. Please note that discussing a paper topic with your T.F. prior to beginning work is mandatory.
Distance Education Exams: (from the Faculty Handbook) “Students enrolled in [distance] courses who live outside New England may choose to travel to campus for their exams. If they do not travel to campus, they must arrange to take their exams at an alternate location with an approved proctor. They submit a proctored exam form online for each exam (even if they use the same proctor) no later than one week before the on-campus exam. See pages 47-48 of the Extension School catalogue for information about proctor qualifications.”
Libraries: (from the Faculty Handbook) “Extension School degree, certificate, and diploma candidates with Harvard University photo ID cards have borrowing privileges at Widener, Lamont, Countway, and Baker libraries. Graduate-credit students who are not admitted ALM candidates but who need borrowing privileges at Widener Library may purchase a special borrower’s card for $100 per term by presenting their registration confirmations to the Privileges Desk in Widener Library.” (Widener information is 617-495-2411.) “The Grossman Library, on the third floor of Sever Hall, is the Extension School’s reserve reading and study library. It is open to all Extension School students. The library also has a small computer lab for registered students.” (Grossman Library phone is 617-495-4163.)
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Online resources: The main page for e-resources is at http://e-research.lib.harvard.edu/V .
One particular source that you should all get in the habit of consulting is the Oxford English Dictionary, which is available through both through the above address (use the "Find E-Resources" tab to search for it) and the “Web Links” box on the course website’s homepage. To see the entire history of a word in English, from its first noted use on down to the present day, you should consult this dictionary. For any questions on vocabulary, this is the first place to check, and it is particularly useful to see what connotations for any given word existed in Shakespeare's time.

For graduate research, or for any of you, grad or undergrad, interested in reading further into criticism, a good place to start searching is the "MLA International Bibliography" (not to be confused with the "MLA Directory of Periodicals"). Two good sources for electronic journals are "Project Muse" and "Jstor." You should, of course, never let what is available electronically dictate your research; at the same time, I encourage you to fully avail yourself of Harvard's generous electronic offerings.

For texts of works from all time periods, try "Literature Online." The searches are somewhat problematic, and it takes some time to get used to the logic, but it is worth acclimating yourself.

For a quick search on a work of art, check http://www.artcyclopedia.com/ (also available in the “Web Links” box on the course website’s homepage).



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Writing Center: We encourage all students, undergrad and grad alike, to take advantage of the Extension School’s writing center. Tutors are trained in assisting students with all levels of writing, from sentence-level structure to crafting a concise, effective thesis statement, to incorporating research material.  Online tutorials are available.  The website for the center is http://www.extension.harvard.edu/2006-07/resources/writing.jsp.  Sessions are 50 minutes long, and each student is allowed 7 sessions per semester.  Although the writing centers do not provide proofreading, they will indeed go over slices of your draft work with you, and will be most happy to work with you closely on all aspects of your writing, including drafting a thesis statement.

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