Guide to Accessible Programming



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A Guide to Accessible Programming

There are many steps in making a program completely accessible; below are some resources that can help you get started. This is not an exhaustive list, but rather a guide to assist you in ensuring that your programs and activities are accessible for all people. Please note: inclusion on this list does not constitute an endorsement, but is provided for informational purposes only.



General Resources About the ADA:

Understanding what is and is not covered under the ADA can be complicated. The resources below can help your organization identify what aspects – whether physical or programmatic – should be altered to ensure accessibility for all.


ADA Accessibility Standards 2010 – Current Accessibility Standards for renovations, additions and new construction of buildings and facilities

http://www.ada.gov/2010ADAstandards_index.htm


ADA National Network (Regional Centers) – Through its 10 regional centers, the ADA National Network provides information, guidance and training on the Americans with Disabilities Act.

(800) 949-4232 (Voice /TTY)

www.adata.org
Chicago Accessibility Code – Questions should be directed to the Mayor’s Office for Persons with Disabilities (MOPD) Accessibility Compliance Unit. http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/mopd/provdrs/comply.html
Chicago Cultural Accessibility Consortium – Empowers Chicago’s cultural spaces to become more accessible to visitors with disabilities. http://chicagoculturalaccess.weebly.com/
City of Chicago Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities

(312) 744-7050 (312) or 744 4964 (Toll Free/TTY) http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/mopd.html


Great Lakes ADA Center – Regional ADA Center for Technical Assistance and Training on the ADA.

(800)-949-4232 (V/TTY)

www.adagreatlakes.org
Illinois Accessibility Code – Illinois has additional standards beyond the federal ADA. http://www.illinois.gov/cdb/business/codes/pages/illinoisaccessibilitycode.aspx
The Chicago Community Trust – “Renewing the Commitment” An ADA Compliance Guide for Nonprofits

http://www.cct.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/RenewingADACommitment_0211.pdf


Title III (Privately owned and operated programs and services) – Nondiscrimination on the basis of disability by public accommodations and in commercial facilities http://www.ada.gov/regs2010/titleIII_2010/titleIII_2010_regulations.pdf
U.S. Access Board – A federal agency that promotes equality for people with disabilities through leadership in accessible design and the development of accessibility guidelines and standards

(800) 872-2253 (Voice), (800) 993-2822 (TTY)

www.access-board.gov
U.S. Department of Justice, Disability Rights Division

(800) 514-0301 (Voice), (800) 514-0383 (TTY)

www.ada.gov

Accessibility at Your Cultural Organization:

In addition to the general resources listed above, there are a number of useful resources specific to the accessibility of cultural organizations.



Bodies of Work – A network of artists and organizations whose art illuminates the disability experience. –

http://www.ahs.uic.edu/dhd/bodiesofwork/


Design for Accessibility: A Cultural Administrators Handbook

http://arts.gov/publications/design-accessibility-cultural-administrators-handbook


Listen Tech- makes iDSP, a new generation of personal listening products that can be used in various places where it’s difficult to hear, like: theaters, lecture halls, concert venues, houses of worship, and more.

1-800-330-0891 or 1-801-233-8992

http://www.listentech.com/
The Kennedy Center – One of the leading experts in accessibility with many tip sheets and resources. See below for a full listing of resource topics. http://www.kennedy-center.org/accessibility/education/lead/resources.html
Tip Sheets:

• The Color Red in Design

Captioning and CART

• Large Print Programs

• Radio Frequency, Induction Loop, and Infrared Assistive Listening Systems

• Producing and Distributing Braille and Large Print Programs

• Service Animals and the Revised ADA Regulations

Staff Training Resources

• Universal Design Resources on the Web

• Universal Principles of Online Accessible Ticketing

• The Impact of the 2010 Regulations on Hold and Release Policies for Wheelchair Accessible Seating

Books and Brochures:

• Assistive Listening Devices for People with Hearing Loss – A Guide for Performing Arts Settings

• Audio Description for People with Vision Loss – A Guide for Performing Arts Settings

• Sensory Friendly Programming for People with Social & Cognitive Learning Disabilities

Website Accessibility:

An organization’s website is one of the first places patrons visit for information and it is vital that your website is accessible to all audiences. Below are some guidelines and a resource to help evaluate the accessibility of your site.


Knowbility – Organization that has done a lot of work with the Arts/Culture Community regarding Web Accessibility and performs web accessibility evaluations

http://www.knowbility.org/


Section 508 Web Accessibility Standards
http://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/communications-and-it/about-the-section-508-standards/section-508-standards
U.S. DOJ Fact Sheet on Web Accessibility for Local and State Governments

http://www.ada.gov/websites2.htm



Accessible and Effective Communication:

People who have vision, hearing or speech disabilities (“communication disabilities”) use different ways to communicate. To ensure all people can enjoy performances, screenings, panels and other experiences, there are a number of accommodations organizations can make to improve communication. The most standard are:



  • American Sign Language Interpreters

  • Captioning for videos

  • Communications Access in Real-time Translation (CART)

  • Audio Description

  • Touch Tours

View a general fact sheet about different types of communications here: http://www.ada.gov/effective-comm.htm
Audio Description Associates, LLC. – Audio Description provides access to the visual elements – action, costumes, settings, gestures, facial expressions and other visually engaging images – of television/film, museum exhibitions, theater and a variety of events.
(301) 920-0218
http://www.audiodescribe.com/
Chicago Hearing Society – Empowers deaf, hard of hearing and hearing people to communicate and collaborate by providing an array of services including interpreter and CART services.
(773) 248-9121
http://www.chicagohearingsociety.org/


Efficiency Reporting – CART and Captioning

(630) 682-8887

http://www.efficiencyreporting.com/
Wilde Mouth – Chicago-based professional Voice Actor and Audio Describer for ensuring performances and screenings are accessible to X and Y.
(773) 895-5691
http://wildemouth.com/

Training Resources:

Great Lakes ADA Center – Regional ADA Center for Technical Assistance and Training on the ADA

800-949-4232 (V/TTY)

www.adagreatlakes.org
JJ’s List – Communications and marketing social enterprise that helps businesses incorporate disability-aware marketing, customer services and employment best practices into core business strategies.

(847) 869-0000

http://www.jjslist.com/
Open Doors Organization – Makes goods and services accessible to people with disabilities in the travel and tourism industry.

(773) 388-8839



www.opendoorsnfp.org
Contributing Organizations: ADA 25 Chicago and the Chicago Cultural Accessibility Consortium

www.ada25chicago.org





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