Iga-218M: Inclusive Security



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IGA-218M: Inclusive Security

Semester: Winter / January 2018

Instructor: Ambassador Swanee Hunt

Course Schedule: Tuesday, January 2 – Friday, January 12 (Some evening commitments)

Location: Littauer 280 (Jan 2-12) or other locations where specified

Office: Taubman 128 (Center for Public Leadership)

Course assistants: TBD

CA office hours: By appointment

Our class will address these key questions:


  • Do foreign policy experts need to recognize untapped resources to avert or resolve conflict?

  • How do gender stereotypes impact women’s political leadership as well as public policies regarding violent conflict?

  • What have women’s experiences been, across cultures, in confronting violent conflict? What are some advantages?

  • What are some behind-the-scenes challenges faced by women leaders addressing violent conflicts?

  • What steps can policy makers take to benefit from these initiatives? Namely, what is the status of various conflict areas’ policies addressing issues of “women, peace and security”?

Such questions have been raised at an abstract level and hotly debated by theorists. This course will take that debate to a practical, policy-oriented level, examining the work of women in troubled regions worldwide. We will tease out the unexamined framework of successful women-led initiatives from conflicts around the world.


My aim is to offer you not only my experience and conceptual thinking, but also to draw on your wisdom and to introduce you to experts from around the world. Pulling from the most current research and on-the-ground developments, you will bridge theory and practice and examine strategies and tactics for increasing women’s participation in peace and security decision making. As our guests, we will have 10 accomplished women leaders from various conflict areas such as Syria, Afghanistan, Colombia, Iraq, Israel, Kenya, Palestine, Bosnia, Philippines, and South Sudan.
Participants will be highly respected leaders with whom I have worked for years, and who are examples of the difference women make when they are around major decision-making tables (with formal or informal authority). Most of these outrageous innovators have overcome the most difficult circumstances, working for decades to stabilize their country or region. We will hear first-hand their strategies and reflections on how women play a critical role in preventing violent conflict, ending hostilities, implementing peace agreements, mobilizing their communities to reconcile, and rebuilding post-conflict. We’ll also hear plenty of examples of how women work against each other, create division and hostility.
You will have the opportunity to individually interview our guests in more depth. Doing so, you’ll break new ground in your analysis of what leaders like them are doing in the face of war, thinking through how you, after you leave graduate school, will create bridges between them and policy makers (including yourself).

You will enter the classroom with your own wealth of experiences and intellectual curiosity. You will leave this course with:





  1. greater understanding of several regions of violent conflict, with a focus on national policies related to UNSCR 1325;

  2. increased understanding of the traditional policy-making process;

  3. new thoughts about the impact of gender on public policy;

  4. insights about the role of women in peacebuilding efforts;

  5. rationale for you, future leaders, to include all stakeholders around the policy-making table;

  6. concrete strategies to move under-represented groups into the policy-making arena;

  7. honed professional negotiation, advocacy, writing and presentation skills; and

  8. personal insights into yourselves and your colleagues.



GRADING

Prerequisites


None. Men are especially encouraged to enroll. Students from Fletcher, MIT, etc. are welcome. The class make-up typically spans a wide range of experiences and perspectives, including students from different Harvard graduate schools.
Auditors

Auditors will be broken up into 2 categories: Active participant or audit only. Active participant students are expected to complete readings, attend classes, participate in discussions, and contribute to group projects. Audit only auditors should do readings and attend class, but are not expected to participate in class discussions or group projects (presentations, briefings).


Grading Breakdown

  • Class Participation (30%)

  • Group Theme Presentation (10%)

  • Final Group Written Policy Brief (50s%)

  • Reaching In, Reaching Out (10%)

Assignments are due 30 minutes before the start of class and should be posted on the course website unless otherwise noted. Points will be deducted from your grade for each day an assignment is late.


Class Participation and online forum

Each student will contribute to a rich class discussion. Readings are weighted toward the beginning of the course to allow you to choose other readings tailored to your specific interests later in the course.


Students are expected to participate in class discussions. It is important that you complete the readings and come to class ready to share your views, ask questions, debate with your colleagues, and contribute to our collective enterprise. Attendance is mandatory.
Your participation is required both in-class and on the course Canvas site. Your contributions should include questions and comments on required or recommended readings, often in conversation with your classmates. Both will be assessed to determine your final participation grade. The quality of your comments matter more than the quantity.
This is a no screen classroom – no phones, tablets, or laptops may be used during class (ADA exceptions apply). Screen usage will affect your participation grade.
Group Theme Presentation

You will work in small groups for the two major course assignments. Your grade will be determined by your ability to work with this group; such work can be the most challenging aspect of the course. With that in mind, it will benefit you to jointly establish goals, roles, and norms during your first meeting. You will have the opportunity to assess not only your own performance, but that of your teammates as well.

Students will be assigned a theme based on the course content. Each group of four or five students, in partnership with 2-3 women leaders from the Institute for Inclusive Security Symposium will give a 1-1.5 hour presentation outlining how their assigned theme permeates and affects conflict areas globally. Groups can choose to discuss the theme as a global issue or choose specific conflict areas as case studies. Presentations should show a nuanced understanding of the diverse forces that drive hostilities and how their theme relates to particular types of conflicts. Be sure to be creative in this presentation; you may use PowerPoint, pictures, film clips, music, or other aids.
Final Policy Brief

In addition to the policy briefing described below, you will prepare a policy memo of up to 14 pages (1.5 spaced, size 12 font) incorporating the group theme into the discussion of women’s participation in stability and security. The briefing should have an enticing introduction and a compelling conclusion; outside references may be noted within the text or as endnotes or footnotes.


The memo should include:

  1. a discussion of the nature of the selected theme as it relates to the policy maker’s organization;

  2. critical information about the role women currently play in the selected region or conflict relevant to the policy maker;

  3. in-depth description and analysis of the work of a few women you recommend be included in the policy maker’s work in the conflict area (include our guest experts as primary resources);

  4. specific ways the policy maker could involve women in current agency programs;

  5. financial cost-benefit discussion, if applicable;

  6. appraisal of the political pitfalls and opportunities your recommendations could entail.

Group grades will be based on the accompanying written brief: presentation clarity and tightness, persuasion of the arguments. Resources are available on Canvas.


Word to the Wise:

The written brief will be assessed according to professional standards, i.e., no grammatical, punctuation, or spelling errors; no font size inconsistencies, dangling headings, etc. When you hand the briefing to the policy maker, you are saying, “This is the very best I am capable of producing.”


Each of you is responsible for the whole product, even if you were the original drafter of a specific segment. You are welcome to submit your written briefing for review and preliminary comments the day before your final submission. However, even the early submission should be in polished form.
Final Policy Briefing

In addition to the written memo, each student/leader group will give a 30-minute briefing to a major policy maker, who will be played by Ambassador Hunt or a guest. The briefing will press the case that women should be included in efforts to avert conflict, launch a peace process, and/or stabilize a particular conflict area, incorporating the theme assigned to the group. The content of each presentation will depend on the policy maker being persuaded. You may use desktop PowerPoint, pictures, or other aids appropriate to the setting.


Each group will present its briefing to a policy maker of its choice, who will be played by Ambassador Hunt or a guest. Student groups should identify a leading policy maker in any of several agencies or organizations who will have enough clout to make a difference. Suggested organizations include the U.S. Military, U.S. State Department, Middle East Institute, European Union, Council on Foreign Relations, World Council of Churches, Anti-Defamation League, International Crisis Group, UN Security Council, UN Secretary General’s Office, UN High Commission for Human Rights, UN High Commission for Refugees, Central Intelligence Agency, or government leaders in individual countries.
The discussion following each policy briefing will assess strategies used, the power of the presentation, and suggestions for improvement.
Reaching In, Reaching Out

Each student will submit two short writings: a letter to the editor (200 words) and a personal integrative journal entry (500 words).


Your letter to the editor will be written to a major news outlet in response to a current event relevant to this course. It will respond to an article recently published in the newspaper or to the overall approach of the newspaper to the issue at hand.
Your journal entry will synthesize the readings, assignments, and class discussions through the lens of your personal experiences and will be read only by the teaching staff. The writing should be thoughtful, demonstrating your personal growth in the class and referencing the readings.
Resource Suggestions from Institute for Inclusive Security:

  • Inclusive Security Library List: http://www.inclusivesecurity.org/explore-resources/

  • The Georgetown Women, Peace & Security research repository: http://iwpsd.libguides.com/content.php?pid=339544&sid=2776115

  • YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/inclusivesecurity

  • Website resources section: http://www.inclusivesecurity.org/explore-resources/

  • Website publications library: http://www.inclusivesecurity.org/explore-resources/research-and-publications-library/


REQUIRED BOOKS

  • Anderlini, Sanam. Women Building Peace, What They Do and Why it Matters (2007).

Read entire book.

  • Cohn, Carol. Women and Wars (2013).

Read Foreword, Chapters 1, 5-7, 9-10, (Chapter 8 recommended).

  • Bohnet, Iris. Gender Equality by Design. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Read entire book.
RECOMMENDED BOOKS

  • Banaji, Mahzarin R., and Anthony G. Greenwald. Blind Spot: Hidden Biases of Good People. Random House LLC, 2013. Chapters 1 and 2.

  • Gerzema, John, and Michael D'Antonio. The Athena doctrine: How women (and the men who think like them) will rule the future. John Wiley & Sons, 2013.

  • Naím, Moisés. The End of Power: From Boardrooms to Battlefields and Churches to States, Why Being in Charge Isn't What It Used to Be., 2014.

  • Hudson, Valerie, and Patricia Leidl. The Hillary Doctrine: Sex & American Foreign Policy. New York: Columbia University Press. Foreword and Chapters 1, 2, 5 and 7. Available at the Harvard COOP, Amazon.com, or on Canvas.

CLASS SCHEDULE

Tuesday, January 3 – Friday, January 13
December 31 - January 1

Reading Period

Assignments

  • Write a 2-3 sentence bio of yourself, one sentence highlighting what you want to get out of the class. Include your student status (For Credit, Audit Participant, Audit Only). Send this information and a photo to the Course Assistants via Canvas by 5pm on Sunday, December 31.

  • Write “Five Interesting Things About Me” on the class’s Canvas page by noon on Monday, January 1.



Tuesday, January 2


Session 1: Introduction and Gender Theory

Location TBD


Schedule


11:00

1:00

At home, take the Implicit Association Test. Please take the test right before class if possible. Then, transition location TBD for a 1 pm start.

1:00

2:00

Welcome and course overview

2:00

2:45

Explanation of student introductions

2:45

3:00

Break

3:00

3:45

Begin student introductions

3:45

4:00

Break

4:00

4:30

Discussion of Implicit Association Test

4:30

6:00

Threaded discussion of readings and more student introductions

6:00

6:15

Break

6:15

8:00

Dinner and (still more) student introductions



Required Readings (152 pages)

  • Bowles, Hannah Riley. “Psychological Perspectives on Gender in Negotiation.” Chapter 28 in The SAGE Handbook of Gender and Psychology. Ryan, Michelle and Nyla Branscombe, eds. Sage Publications Ltd. 2013. (15 pages)

  • Vedantam, Shankar. “Invisible Current”, pp. 88-111 in The Hidden Brain. Spiegel & Grau, 2010. (23 pages)

  • Kanter, Rosabeth Moss. Men and Women of the Corporation, New Edition, 1993, pp. 206-242 (Ch.8 “Numbers: Minorities and Majorities”). (36 pages)

  • Woolley, Anita, et al. “Evidence for a Collective Intelligence Factor in the Performance of Human Groups.” Science. Vol. 330, no. 6004, October 2010: 686-688. (3 pages)

  • Hudson, Valerie, et al. Sex and World Peace (2012). Excerpt from chapter 1, pages 1-15. (15 pages)

  • “Women in the Workplace 2016.” Lean In and McKinsey&Co. (30 pages)

  • Cohn, Carol. Women and Wars (2013). Chapter 1, pages 1-30. (30 pages)


Wednesday, January 3


Session 2: Women as Leaders and Decision Makers

Harvard Kennedy School, Room: Littauer 280
Schedule

9:00

10:15

Discussion: When women lead

10:15

10:30

Group assignments

10:30

10:45

Break

10:45

11:45

Guest speaker

11:45

12:30

Lunch

12:30

1:30

Margaret Thatcher: The Iron Lady (discussion and film excerpts)

1:30

1:45

Break

1:45

2:30

Threaded discussion of readings

2:30

3:15

Madame Presidenta: Why not the U.S.?

3:15

4:30

Hillary: Concession’s Legacy


Required Readings (89 pages)

  • O’Reilly, Marie. “The real impact of a female president? More women in politics”, Public Radio International, 25 October 2016. (4 pages)

  • Carlin, Diana B. and Kelly L. Winfrey, “Have You Come a Long Way, Baby? Hillary Clinton, Sarah Palin, and Sexism in 2008 Campaign Coverage,” Communication Studies, vol. 60, no. 4 (2009): 326-343. (17 pages)

  • Bush, Daniel. “The Hidden Sexism that could Sway the Election”, PBS Newshour. July 2016. (15 pages)

  • Worden, Scott and Nina Sudhakar, “Learning from Women’s Success in the 2010 Afghan Elections”, United States Institute of Peace, June 18, 2012, pp.1-12. (12 pages)

  • Shah, Bina. “The Legacy of Benazir Bhutto”, New York Times, December 2014 (4 pages)

  • Kolb, Deborah M. and Mara Olekalns,“Would the World Be Different with Merkel, May, and Clinton in Charge?”, Harvard Business Review, 12 September 2016. (5 pages)

  • Timsit, Annabelle. “Women in Charge: A New Record?”, Politico Magazine, 30 July 2016 (5 pages)

  • Gilbert, Jonathan. “South America’s Powerful Women are Embattled: Is Gender a Factor?”, The New York Times, 14 May 2016. (4 Pages)

  • Nye, Joseph S. “When Women Lead.” Project Syndicate. February 8, 2012. (3 pages)

  • “Women in Government.” Catalyst, 2016. (8 pages)

  • Hunt, Swanee. “Let Women Rule.” Foreign Affairs, May/June 2007. (5 pages)

  • Volden, Craig et al. “When Are Women More Effective Lawmakers than Men?” 2013. (17 pages)


Recommended Readings

  • Bear, Julia B. and Anita Williams Woolley, “The Role of Gender in Team Collaboration and Performance”, 2011. (5 pages)

  • “A Study in Leadership: Why Women Do It Better Than Men.” Zenger Folkman, 2012. (4 Pages)


Thursday, January 4

Session 3: Gender and Conflict

Harvard Kennedy School, Room: Littauer 280

Schedule

9:00

9:30

Student introductions

9:30

10:45

Iron Ladies of Liberia (film excerpts and discussion)

10:45

11:00

Break

11:00

12:00

Threaded discussion of readings

12:00

12:30

Even more student introductions

12:30

1:30

Lunch

1:30

2:30

Security concepts

2:30

3:30

Why Women

3:30

3:45

Break

3:45

4:30

Evidence for women in security (Marie O’Reilly)

4:30

5:30

Asha in Somalia


Required Readings (87 pages)

  • “Building Inclusive Security: Asha Hagi Elmi and the Somalia Peace Process”, WAPPP/HKS Case, 2006. (34 pages)

  • O’Reilly, Marie. “Why Women? Inclusive Security and Peaceful Societies”, The Institute for Inclusive Security, October 2015. (11 pages)

  • “Facts and Figures: Peace and Security”, UN Women, 2015. (2 pages)

  • “G-8 Resolution: Conclusions of the Meeting of the G8 Foreign Ministers”, G8 Roma Initiatives on Conflict Prevention, 2001. (4 pages)

  • UN Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace, and Security, 2000. (4 pages)

  • Koch, Michael, and Fulton, Sarah. “In the Defense of Women: Gender, Office Holding and National Security Policy in Established Democracies”, Texas A&M University, 2011. (16 pages)

  • Disney, Abby. Women, War, and Peace, 2011. [See especially: Afghanistan and Colombia] (video)

  • McIntyre, Matthew. “Sex differences in aggression during a simulated war game”, Harvard University, 2007. (7 pages)

  • Weingarten, Elizabeth and Valerie Hudson. “Gender as a Second Language”, 2016. (9 pages)


Recommended Readings

  • UN Security Council Resolution 2242, 2015.

  • UN Security Council Resolution 1889, 2009.

  • UN Security Council Resolution 2122, 2013.

  • Martin, Sarah. “Must Boys Be Boys? Ending Sexual Exploitation and Abuse in Peacekeeping Missions”, Refugees International, 2005.

  • Strickland, Richard and Nata Duvvury. “Gender Equity and Peacebuilding: From Rhetoric to Reality: Finding the Way”. Washington, D.C.: International Center for Research on Women, 2003: 1-48.

  • Marshall, Donna Ramsey. “Women in War and Peace: Grassroots Peacebuilding”, Washington, D.C.: United States Institute of Peace, 2000.

  • Hunt, Swanee and Cristina Posa. “Women Waging Peace: Inclusive Security”, Foreign Policy, May 1, 2001.

  • Beaman, Lori, et al. “Female Leadership Raises Aspirations and Educational Attainment for Girls: A Policy Experiment in India”, ScienceXpress, 2011.

  • Movie, “Lord of War”, 2005.


Friday, January 5


Session 4: Gender and Conflict Cont’d

Harvard Kennedy School, Room: Littauer 280
Schedule

9:30

10:45

Club of Madrid and Policy Forum Videos

10:45

11:00

Break

11:00

11:45

Threaded Discussion of Readings

11:45

12:45

Lunch

12:30

1:30

Countering Violent Extremism

1:30

1:45

Break

1:45

3:00

In Conversation: Dr. Cynthia Enloe and Gen (Ret) Tad Oelstrom

3:00

3:15

Break

3:15

4:30

Case study: Rwanda


Required Readings (148 pages)

  • Enloe, Cynthia. Seriously! Investigating Crashed and Crises as if Women Mattered, 2013. Chapters 1 and 7. (48 pages)

  • Hunt, Swanee. “The Rise of Rwanda’s Women: Rebuilding and Reuniting a Nation”, Foreign Affairs, May/June 2014. (7 pages)

  • Harris, Cameron and Daniel James Minton. “Is Standing for Women a Stand Against Terrorism? Exploring the Connection Between Women’s Rights and Terrorism”, Journal of Human Rights, 0:1-19. (19 pages)

  • “People, Not Pawns: Women’s Participation in Violent Extremism Across MENA”, USAID Report, September 2015. (4 pages)

  • Barsa, Michelle. “US Approaches to Countering Violent Extremism Must Prioritize Women”, The Pacific Standard, 18 March 2015. (2 pages)

  • O’Neill, Jacqueline and Jarad Vary. “Allies and Assets: Strengthening DDR and SSR Through Women’s Inclusion”, Chapter 5 in Monopoly of Force, Melanne Civic and Michael Miklaucic, eds. Washington, D.C.: NDU Press, 2011. (14 pages)

  • Clinton, Hillary. Remarks on Women, Peace, and Security delivered on December 19, 2011. (10 pages)

  • Reiter, Dan. “The Positivist Study of Gender and International Relations.” Journal of Conflict Resolution, 59(7), 2014: 1301-1326 (25 pages)

  • Ahmadi, Belquis and Sadaf Lakhani. “Afghan Women and Violent Extremism: Colluding, Perpetrating, or Preventing?”, United States Institute of Peace Special Report, November 2016. (15 pages)

  • Keuhnast, Kathleen and Danielle Robertson. “Women Chartering a New Course on Peace and Security”, United States Institute of Peace, 1 March 2016. (4 pages)


Recommended Readings

  • Enloe, Cynthia. “Conclusion: The Personal is International”, Bananas, Beaches & Bases: Making Feminist Sense of International Politics. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989: 195-201.

  • McDermott, Rose. “Testosterone, Cortisol, and Aggression in a Simulated Crisis Game”, University of Nebraska, 2006.

  • Chatellier, Sarah and Shabana Fayyaz. “Women Moderating Extremism in Pakistan”, Institute for Inclusive Security, August 2012.

  • Chatellier, Sarah and Shabana Fayyaz. “Women’s Roles in Post-conflict Reconstruction and Rehabilitation in Pakistan”, Institute for Inclusive Security, August 2012.

  • McGhie, M. and E. Njoki Wamai. “Beyond the numbers: Women’s participation in the Kenya National Dialogue and Reconciliation”, Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue, March 2011.

  • Florea, Natalie B., et al. “Negotiating from Mars to Venus: Gender in Simulated International Negotiations”, Simulation & Gaming, 34(2), 2003: 226-248.

  • “Securing the Peace: Guiding the International Community Towards Women’s Effective Participation throughout Peace Processes”, UN Development Fund for Women, Oct 2005: 1-18.




Saturday, January 6


Session 5: Bringing Ideas Together

Harvard Kennedy School, Room: Littauer 280
Schedule

9:00

12:00

Group work time

12:00

12:45

Discussion: The conflict in Syria

12:45

1:00

Break

1:00

1:30

Fukuyama debate prep

1:30

2:30

Fukuyama debate

2:30

2:45

Break

2:45

3:00

How to write a letter to the editor

3:00

4:00

A Bold Initiative: Born at The Kennedy School (Carrie O’Neil)

4:00

4:30

Break and transition to 168 Brattle St.

4:30

6:30

Cocktails and hors d’oeuvres with women leaders (168 Brattle St)


Required Readings (153 pages)

  • Fukuyama, Francis. “Women and the Evolution of World Politics”, Foreign Affairs, September/October 1998: 24-40. (17 pages)

  • Jaquette, Jane S. “States Make War (A Response to Fukuyama’s “Women and the Evolution of World Politics)”, Foreign Affairs, Jan/Feb 1999: 128-129. (2 pages)

  • Ehrenreich, Barbara. “Men Hate War Too”, Foreign Affairs, Jan/Feb 1999: 118-122. (4 pages)

  • Wrangham, Richard and Dale Peterson. “The Gentle Ape”, Demonic Males. Mariner Press, 1997: 200-219. (19 pages)

  • Ehrenreich, Barbara. Commencement speech at Barnard College, 2004. (5 pages)

  • Edström, J., Hassink, A., Shahrokh, T., & Stern, E. “Engendering Men: A Collaborative Review of Evidence on Men and Boys in Social Change and Gender Equity”, Sections 1 and 8. Institute of Development Studies, Promundo-US and Sonke Gender Justice, 2015. (31 pages)

  • “Building More Inclusive Political Transitions: A Review of the Syrian Case”, Inclusive Security, 2014. (8 pages)

  • “Women of Syria: A Strong Constituency for Peace.” UN Women, September 1, 2016. (1 page)

  • Williams, Kristin. “Perspectives on the Peace Process: A Survey of Syrian Women”, Inclusive Security, 21 January, 2014. (13 pages)

  • Tax, Meredith. “When Women Fight ISIS”, The New York Times, 18 August 2016 (3 pages)

  • Ghazzawi, R., Mohammad, A., & Ramadan, O. “Peacebuilding defines our future now: A study of women’s peace activism in Syria”, Badel Foundation, 2015. (40 pages)

  • Women@Google: International Women’s Commission. Uploaded November 12, 2007. (video)





Sunday, January 7

No Class



Monday, January 8


Session 6: Group presentations with visiting women leaders

Harvard Kennedy School, Room: Littauer 280


9:30

11:30

Course Conversation 1

11:30

12:15

Lunch

12:15

2:15

Course Conversation 2

2:15

2:30

Break

2:30

4:30

Course Conversation 3

Tuesday, January 9


Session 7: Group presentations with visiting women leaders

Harvard Kennedy School, Room: Littauer 280
Assignment

Letter to the Editor: 200 words submitted to a news organization such as the New York Times, Washington Post, Boston Globe, Huffington Post, or Global Post. Clear with the course assistant for other news organizations. Post a copy of your submission, including details of where it was submitted, to the course page before class.


11:00

1:00

Course Conversation 4

1:00

1:30

Lunch

1:30

3:30

Course Conversation 5

6:00

8:00

JFK Forum


Wednesday, January 10

Session 8: Group Work Day

Assignment

**Policy Briefs due at 5:30pm on Canvas**


6:00

10:00

Global Gala (168 Brattle Street)



Thursday, January 11

Session 9: Group Policy Briefings


Harvard Kennedy School, Room: Littauer 280
Schedule

9:00

9:30

Informal breakfast at HKS Café

9:30

12:30

Briefings/simulations

12:30

1:00

Lunch

1:00

4:00

Briefings/simulations


Friday, January 12

Session 10: Reflections, Course Wrap-up

Location TBD
Schedule

9:00

9:30

Breakfast

9:30

10:30

Ambassador Hunt: Public Service, Private Sacrifice

10:30

11:00

Break

11:00

12:00

Wrap-up and Farewells


Required Reading

  • Slaughter, Anne-Marie. “Why Women Still Can’t Have It All.” The Atlantic, July-August 2012.


Assignment

  • Reaching In: Personal Integrative Journal Entry. Send journal entries to Ambassador Hunt by email at swanee_hunt@harvard.edu by 5:00 PM, Saturday, January 13






IGA-218M



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