Syllabus for cjsa 1312 Crime in America Hybrid Course Semester Hours Credit: 3 Course Dates/Times: In Class sessions



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SYLLABUS FOR CJSA 1312

Crime in America

Hybrid Course

Semester Hours Credit: 3
Course Dates/Times:

In Class sessions Wednesdays: 20, 27 August; 3, 10, 17, 24 September; 17:30-21:30

with additional weekly online discussions and assignments each week.



Instructor: Larron White

Office Hours: 0800-1600

icutryn@yahoo.com

3689-0304



INSTRUCTOR BIOGRAPHY

Hello, my name is Larron White. I am 40 years old and was born and raised in Atlanta, Ga. I am a Commissioned Officer in the United States Navy and I have been in the US Navy for 22 years. I am Security Officer and served as an enlisted service member for 15 years where I worked as a k-9 handler. My duty stations include: USS WASP, USS EISENHOWER, Naval Station Roosevelt Roads Puerto Rico, Naval Air Station Key West, Naval Support Activity Bahrain (twice), Naval Expeditionary Guard Battalion Guantanamo Bay Cuba and NCIS. I have four kids ages 23, 22, 18 and 10. My hobbies are traveling, reading, and working out. I love all kinds of sports and my favorite teams are the Atlanta Falcons, Atlanta Braves, and OKC Thunder.


I. INTRODUCTION

  1. This course will introduce students to American crime problems in historical perspective, social and public policy factors affecting crime, impact and crime trends, social characteristics of specific crimes, and prevention of crime.



  1. This course is not chronologically dependent upon other Law Enforcement courses. It is a required course for the Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice degree program.



  1. This course is occupationally related and serves in preparation for careers in law enforcement, criminal justice, and corrections.



  1. Prerequisite(s): (None)

II. LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of this course, Crime in America, the student will be able to:

A. Explain the psychological, social, and economic impact of crime in society.

B. Identify characteristics of major crimes.

C. Discuss the impact on society and the prevention thereof.

D. List crimes by definition and classification according to major sub groupings.

E. Discuss the basic theoretical and behavioral models, as well as the historical development of laws and contributions of famous law givers.

F. Define selected terms vital to the understanding of the legal terminology which will be encountered in numerous Criminal Justice courses.



III. INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

  1. The instructional materials identified for this course are viewable through

http://www.ctcd.edu/im/im_main.asp


Criminology: The Core - CTC Custom Cover

Siegel

5th

Cengage

2014

9781305028357

B. References:

1. Adler, Freda, Gerhard Mueller, & William Laufer, Criminology and the Criminal Justice System, 4th Ed, New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 2001.

2. Schmalleger, Frank, Criminology Today, 3rd Ed, Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2002.

3. Reid, Sue Titus, Crime and Criminology, 10th Ed, New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 2003.

4. Siegel, Larry J., Criminology, 7th Ed, Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing, 2000.

5. Maxim, Paul & Paul Whitehead, Explaining Crime, 4th Ed, Woburn, MA: Butterworth-Heinenmann, 1998

6. Palacios, Wilson, Paul Cromwell, & Roger Dunham, Crime & Justice in America, 2nd Ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2002.

7. Black's Law Dictionary

8. U.S. Constitution, Bill of Rights, and latest Amendments

IV. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

A. Your first responsibility is scholarship. The grade you receive for this course will not be the grade of the instructor, but rather the grade you and you alone make.

B. You should attend class regularly in both face-to-face and online Blackboard classes. Online attendance involves logging into your Blackboard class and participating in discussions, submitting assignments, etc. Be prepared to also take any unannounced quizzes relating to text assignments and lecture material presented from the beginning of the course. Please refer to ‘Class Attendance and Course Progress’ under the Academic Policies section in our current CTC Course Catalog: http://www.ctcd.edu/academics/catalogs/catalog-continental-international/academic-policies/.

C. You are encouraged to give your best effort throughout the course. From the beginning, you should plan for a steady, organized, and continuous effort, which in the long run will prove more effective for your final grade than a last minute crash-cram policy. Your course grade is not determined solely by exam grade. Such factors as class participation, initiative, attendance, and individual research papers will be considered in grade computation.

D. From time to time, special library and/or outside assignments will be made to members of the class individually and/or in groups. You are expected to read all assignments and fulfill your responsibilities to any group assignment.

E. You are expected to read all assigned material and bring your textbook to class. Keep informed on all assignments, especially after an absence.

F. Good class notes are indispensable for earning a good grade, since both the material assigned and that discussed in class will be the basis for examination material.

G. Scholastic Honesty: All students are required and expected to maintain the highest standards of scholastic honesty in the preparation of all coursework and during examinations. The following are considered examples of scholastic dishonesty:



Plagiarism: The taking of passages from the writing of others without giving proper credit to the sources.

Collusion: Using another’s work as one’s own, or working together with another person in the preparation of work, unless such joint preparation is specifically approved in advance by the instructor.

Cheating: Giving or receiving information on examinations.

H. Special Work: A term paper or other project, per requirements of the instructor, will be required. The subject must be appropriate for the course material. Check with the instructor when you have made a selection. The value is indicated in the semester grade computation and has considerable weight on your final average.



V. COURSE FORMAT – Hybrid with BLACKBOARD

This course has been developed as a hybrid course. Hybrid courses combine face-to-face classroom instruction with assignments and interaction with instructor via email. It is the student’s responsibility to make sure that they have access to Blackboard and that they are familiar with the contents and assignments.

The course will meet for 6 weeks--once a week--for a four-hour session. In addition, instructional strategies will include weekly online discussion boards to develop case studies and group collaboration/projects to equal four hours of online work.
VI. EXAMS
A. There will be a minimum of two major examinations and a written paper or project as follows:
1. Mid-term exam on 02SEP14

2. Final exam on 23SEP14

3. Team Project 16SEP14
B. A student must be present for all examinations. Students who know in advance that they will be absent from an examination due to valid reasons must arrange to take an early examination. Unexpected absences due to illness or extenuating circumstances will require the student to see the instructor about individual make-up work.

C. Students without excused absences will be given a zero for the missed examination.

D. Examinations will consist of both objective (true/false, multiple choice, fill in-the-blank, and matching) and subjective (short answer and essay) questions. Students must be able to communicate both orally and in written form, thus some questions requiring the composition and writing of an essay answer will be required.
VII. SEMESTER GRADE COMPUTATIONS
The final grade in this course will be based on the following:

Attendance & in-class participation 60 points (10 points per class session)

Online participation 72 points (2 points for each post)

Team Presentation 100 points

Midterm exam 100 points

Final exam 100 points

Total possible points: 432
POINTS GRADES

432-388 = A

387-345 = B

344-302= C

301-289= D

Less than 288 = F


Ten points are deducted for each unexcused absence. Military assignments or unavoidable circumstances will be evaluated upon notification of the instructor.
A term paper is expected from all students. The instructor may need to teach this

concept during the course.

Students may vary in their competency levels on these abilities. You can expect to

acquire these educational abilities only if you honor all course policies, attend classes

regularly, and complete all assignment work in good faith and on time.



VIII. NOTES AND ADDITIONAL INSTRUCTIONS FROM COURSE INSTRUCTOR


  1. Tuition refunds are made only in the case of class cancellation or official and timely withdrawal from CTC or from a course. Please refer to the current course catalog for more details, at http://europe.ctcd.edu/library/catalog.php.




  1. GoArmyEd students should contact their education counselor before withdrawing and are required to withdraw through the GoArmyEd portal.


Please note: a military withdrawal does not override CTC’s grading policy. For self-pay students, refunds are computed from the date the Application for Withdrawal or Refund is filed with the CTC Field Representative or designated Student Services Officer. Special conditions apply to students who receive federal, state, and/or institutional financial aid.
Tuition and fees paid directly to the Institution by the Veterans Administration, Title IV (Financial Aid Programs, a sponsor, donor, or scholarship shall be refunded to the source rather than directly to the students.


  1. Course Withdrawals, Student Responsibilities: It is the student’s responsibility to officially withdraw from a course. The instructor cannot initiate a withdrawal based upon a student’s request. Rather, students must initiate the withdrawal with the designated Education Center Representative, through the CTC Field Representative or the Student Services Officer for that region.

Applications for Withdrawal will be accepted at any time before the completion of 75% of the course, after which time the student will be assigned an “FN”- “Failure for Non-attendance.”




  1. Incomplete / Course in Progress Grade Policy: An “IP” or “Incomplete” grade may be assigned by an instructor if a student has made satisfactory progress in a course with the exception of a major quiz, final exam, or other project. The “IP” grade may also be assigned based on circumstances beyond a student’s control, such as personal illness, death in the immediate family, or military orders. Notice of absences, with supporting documentation, may be required by the instructor. The instructor makes the final decision concerning the granting of the incomplete grade. With an “Incomplete” grade, students are required to complete a set amount of work before the instructor will submit an official letter grade. This date can be determined by the instructor but must be within 45 days of the course end date. After completion of the work the instructor can then change the grade of “IP” to the appropriate letter grade. If this work is not completed by the specified date the instructor will change the grade to “F.”




  1. Cellular phones, beepers, and other electronic devices will be turned off while the student is in the classroom or laboratory unless the student is using the device for class purposes. No texting or social networking is allowed during class.




  1. Instructor Discretion: The instructor reserves the right of final decision in course requirements.




  1. Civility: Individuals are expected to be cognizant of what a constructive educational experience is and respectful of those participating in a learning environment. Failure to do so can result in disciplinary action up to and including expulsion.


IX. COURSE OUTLINE

Note:

The instructor has the right to change the course schedule. Any changes will be announced in class. If the student misses a class period and changes are announced, it is the student’s responsibility to receive the missed information from a classmate or the instructor.


The course will meet for 6 weeks--once a week--for a four-hour session. In addition, instructional strategies will include weekly online discussion boards to develop case studies and group collaboration/projects to equal four hours of online work.

Session 1- (19AUG14 – 25AUG14) Intro and Chapters 1, 2, and 3
i.  Class will meet face-to-face (19AUG14 from1730 to 2130)
ii. Due dates for online assignments are noted with assignment

A. Chapter 1, Crime and Criminology

1. LEARNING OBJECTIVES

After mastering the content of this chapter, a student should be able to:

1. Understand the breadth and scope of the field of criminology.

2. Discuss the historical context of criminology.

3. Recognize the differences between the various schools of criminological thought.

4. Discuss the concept of positivism.

5. Understand the various elements of the criminological enterprise.

6. Discuss how criminologists define crime.

7. Recognize the concepts of criminal law.

8. Show how the criminal law is undergoing change.

9. Discuss ethical issues in criminology.

10. Understand international crime trends.

11. Describe the various criminal defenses.

 

2. Learning Activities:

a. Discuss course requirements and activities as contained in the syllabus

b. Classroom lecture/discussion

c. Reading assignment: Chapter 1

d. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor

 

B. Chapter 2, The Nature and Extent of Crime

1. LEARNING OBJECTIVES

After mastering the content of this chapter, a student should be able to:

1. Become familiar with the various forms of crime data.

2. Discuss the problems associated with collecting valid crime data.

3. Discuss the recent trends in the crime rate.

4. Identify the factors that influence crime rates.

5. Understand the patterns in the crime rate.

6. Recognize that there are age, gender, and racial patterns in crime.

7. Discuss the association between social class and crime.

8. Describe the various positions on gun control.

9. Understand Wolfgang’s pioneering research on chronic offending.

10. Understand the influence the discovery of the chronic offender has had on criminology.


2. Learning Activities:

a. Classroom lecture/discussion

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 2

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor


C. Chapter 3, Victims and Victimization

1.      LEARNING OBJECTIVES

After mastering the content of this chapter, a student should be able to:

1. Understand the concept of victimization.

2. Describe the nature of victimization.

3. Discuss the problems of crime victims.

4. Understand the costs of victimization.

5. Discuss the relationship between victimization and antisocial behavior.

6. Recognize the age, gender, and racial patterns in victimization data.

7. Discuss the association between lifestyle and victimization.

8. Understand the term “victim precipitation.”

9. List the routine activities associated with victimization risk.

10. Discuss the various victim assistance programs.

 

2. Learning Activities:

a. Classroom lecture/discussion

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 3

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor


Session 2- (26AUG14 – 01SEP14) Chapters 4,5, and 6
i.  Class will meet face to face (26AUG14 from1730 to 2130)
ii. Online assignment/project
A. Chapter 4: Choice Theory: Because They Want To

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

After mastering the content of this chapter, a student should be able to:

1. Understand the concept of rational choice.

2. Know the work of Beccaria.

3. Discuss the concepts of offense and offender-specific crime.

4. Discuss why violent and drug crimes are rational.

5. Summarize the various techniques of situational crime prevention.

6. Discuss the association between punishment and crime.

7. Understand the concepts of certainty, severity, and speed of punishment.

8. Understand what is meant by general and specific deterrence.

9. Discuss the issues involving the use of incapacitation.

10. Understand the concept of “just desert.”

11. Understand the concept of “three strikes and you’re out.”

 

2. Learning Activities:

a. Classroom lecture/discussion

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 4

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor
B. Chapter 5: Trait Theory

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

After mastering the content of this chapter, a student should be able to:

1. Understand the concept of sociobiology.

2. Discuss the relationship between diet and crime.

3. Understand the association between hormones and crime.

4. Discuss why violent offenders may suffer from neurological problems.

5. Explain the factors that make up the ADHD syndrome.

6. Discuss the role genetics plays in violent behavior.

7. Understand the concepts of evolutionary theory.

8. Discuss the psychodynamics of criminality.

9. Understand the association between media and crime.

10. Discuss the role of personality and intelligence in antisocial behaviors.

 

2. Learning activities:

a. Classroom lecture/discussion

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 5

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor

 

C. Chapter 6: Social Structure Theory

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

After mastering the content of this chapter, a student should be able to:

1. Understand the concept of social structure.

2. Explain the socioeconomic structure of American society.

3. Discuss the concept of social disorganization.

4. Explain the works of Shaw and McKay.

5. Discuss the association between collective efficacy and crime.

6. Understand the concept of strain.

7. Explain what is meant by the term anomie.

8. Understand the concept of cultural deviance.

 

2. Learning Activities:



a. Classroom lecture/discussion

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 6

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor

 

Session 3- (02SEP14 – 08SEP14) Chapters 8 and 10, Midterm Test


i. Class will meet face to face (02SEP14 from 1730 to 2130)
ii. Online assignment/project

A. Chapter 8: Social Conflict & Critical Criminology

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

After mastering the content of this chapter, a student should be able to:

1. Understand the concept of social conflict and how it shapes behavior.

2. Discuss elements of conflict in the justice system.

3. Explain the idea of critical criminology.

4. Discuss the difference between structural and instrumental theory.

5. Discuss the various techniques of critical research.

6. Discuss the term left realism.

7. Understand the concept of patriarchy.

8. Explain what is meant by critical feminist criminology.

9. Discuss peacemaking.

10. Understand the concept of restorative justice.

 

2. Learning Activities:

a. Classroom lecture/discussion

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 8

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor

 

B. Chapter 10: Violent Crime: Personal and Political

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

After mastering the content of this chapter, a student should be able to:

1. Discuss the various causes of violent crime.

2. Discuss the concept of the brutalization process.

3. Discuss the history of rape.

4. Understand the different types of rape.

5. Discuss the legal issues in rape prosecution.

6. Recognize that there are different types of murder.

7. Discuss the differences between serial killing, mass murder, and spree killing.

8. Understand the nature of assault in the home.

9. Understand the careers of armed robbers.

10. Discuss newly emerging forms of violence such as stalking, hate crimes, and workplace violence.

11. Understand the different types of terrorism and what is being done today to combat terrorist activities.

 

2. Learning Activities:

a. Classroom lecture/discussion

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 10

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor
Session 4- (09SEP14 – 15JUL14) Chapters 11 and 12
i. Class will meet face to face (09SEP14 from 1730 to 2130)
ii. Online assignment/project

A. Chapter 11: Property Crimes

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

After mastering the content of this chapter, a student should be able to:

1. Understand the history of theft offenses.

2. Recognize the differences between professional and amateur thieves.

3. Explain the similarities and differences between the different types of larceny.

4. Understand the different forms of shoplifting.

5. Discuss the concept of fraud.

6. Explain what is meant by a confidence game.

7. Understand what it means to burgle a home.

8. Discuss what it takes to be a “good burglar.”

9. Understand the concept of arson.

10. Discuss why people commit arson for profit.

 

2. Learning Activities:



a. Classroom lecture/discussion

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 11

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor

B. Chapter 12: Enterprise Crime: White-Collar Crime, Cyber Crime, and Organized Crime

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

After mastering the content of this chapter, a student should be able to:

1. Understand the concept of enterprise crime.

2. Explain the various types of white-collar crime.

3. Distinguish between the various types of corporate crime.

4. Recognize the extent and various causes of the white-collar crime.

5. Discuss the different approaches to combating white-collar crime.

6. Recognize the forms taken by cyber crime.

7. Describe the methods being used to control cyber crime.

8. List the different types of illegal behavior engaged in by organized crime figures.

9. Describe the evolution of organized crime.

10. Explain how the government is fighting organized crime.

 

2. Learning Activities:



a. Classroom lecture/discussion

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 12

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor
Session 5- (16SEP14 – 22SEP14) Chapters 13, Team Projects
i. Class will meet face to face (16SEP14 from 1730 to 2130)
ii. Online assignment

A. Chapter 13: Public Order Crimes

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

After mastering the content of this chapter, a student should be able to:

1. Discuss the legal cases that define the right to personal sexual relations between consenting adults.

2. Discuss the association between law and morality.

3. Understand what is meant by the terms “moral crusade” and “moral entrepreneur.”

4. Understand and discuss some of the most common paraphilias.

5. Discuss what is meant by “obscenity.”

6. Understand and discuss the various techniques used to control pornography.

7. Understand human trafficking

8. Discuss the various types of prostitution.

9. Discuss the history of drug abuse.

10. Discuss the cause of substance abuse.

11. Identify the various drug control strategies.

 

2. Learning Activities:



a. Classroom lecture/discussion

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 13

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor
Session 6 (23SEP14 – 29SEP14) Chapter 14, Final Exam
i. Class will meet face to face (23SEP14 from 1730 to 2130)
ii. Online assignment


A. Chapter 14: The Criminal Justice System

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

After mastering the content of this chapter, a student should be able to:

1. Discuss the history of the criminal justice system.

2. Identify the component agencies of criminal justice.

3. Explain the various stages in the process of justice.

4. Understand how criminal justice is shaped by the rule of law.

5. Explain the elements of the crime control model.

6. Discuss the problem of prisoner reentry.

7. Discuss what is meant by the justice model.

8. Discuss the elements of due process.

9. Argue the merits of the rehabilitation model.

10. Understand the concept of nonintervention.

11. Explain the elements of the restorative justice model.

 

2. Learning Activities:



a. Classroom lecture/discussion

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 14



c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor



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