Israel Business Update



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Israel Business Update
Volume l Issue 3 October 31, 2006

Prepared by Dr. Mike Cohen Exclusively for Team M-EDG



Veterix: From cow stomach to farmers cellphone
A young startup company from the Golan Heights is trying to alleviate the headaches. Veterix has developed an electronic capsule that a cow swallows. The capsule analyzes certain physiological parameters, and sends a wireless transmission of the data on the animal's health to a monitoring and control unit. If the cow is sick or suffering from a specific problem, the system immediately sends an SMS to the farmer's cellular telephone.
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TopSpin Medical receives FDA approval to start clinical trials in the US with its IntraVascular MRI (IVMRI) catheter for imaging the coronary arteries
TopSpin Medical (TASE: TOPMD) announced today it has received FDA approval to start conducting clinical trials in the US with its IntraVascular MRI (IVMRI) catheter, intended for the characterization of lipid-rich lesions in the coronary arteries. To date the company conducted clinical trials with its IVMRI catheter in Europe and Israel, and following the FDA approval TopSpin intends to extend the clinical trials to leading US clinical sites.

The data collected in the clinical trials will be submitted to the regulatory authorities in Europe and the US for obtaining marketing clearance in these territories.


The company projects that it will receive regulatory clearance in Europe (CE Mark) by the end of 2006, and in the US by the middle of 2007.
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Anti-Depressant Drugs Could Help Treat Osteoporosis

Jerusalem, Israel (AHN) - A new study by researchers from Hebrew University has revealed that stress-induced osteoporosis can be treated by using anti-depressant drugs. Osteoporosis is defined as a condition in which the bones weaken which in turn makes them more vulnerable to fractures. The condition is treatable but remains the most prevalent among post-menopausal women.


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Venture investors in Israel weren't fazed by the war much.

In the third quarter, 87 Israeli high-tech companies raised $381 million from venture investors. That was down about 6 percent from the $404 million raised in the previous quarter, but was 13 percent above the $336 million raised in the third quarter of 2005, according to the Israel Venture Capital Association.



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A culture of survival drives growth

TEL AVIV, Israel--If engineers here seem unfazed by the high-pressure environment of today's technology industries, it is because many have been trained under life-and-death circumstances.

When the Arab-Israeli war erupted in 1973, the Israeli army asked a couple of professors at the Israel Institute of Technology to come up with a way to scramble the guidance systems of incoming Russian-made missiles. The mission, according to the institute, was accomplished in two days.

"In Israel you don't plan. You improvise," said Zak Dechovich, who worked in the government's cybercrime unit before becoming chief executive of SecureOL, a software security company. "The market has its own forces."



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Will pasteurization become a bit passe?
BET SHEMESH, Israel--Atlantium wants to take Louis Pasteur down a peg. The three-year-old company, based about 20 miles outside Tel Aviv, has come up with a water disinfecting system combining ultraviolet light and concepts from fiber optics that the company claims can kill far more microbes, often at a lower cost, than conventional techniques. If a conventional water disinfecting system can erase 10,000 bacteria in a given volume of water, Atlantium will wipe out a billion or more, estimates CEO Ilan Wilf.
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$100 million for biomed research to Technion

Biomed billionaire Alfred Mann has agreed to donate $100 million to the Israel Institute of Technology, or the Technion to set up the second of a planned series of twelve institutes at major research universities.



The Technion institute, like the others, will seek to develop new drugs. Mann picked the university in part because the university is trying to match doctors with engineers and other scientists to come up with medical and drug breakthroughs. Mann, who is estimated to be worth over $2 billion, has already donated $100 million to USC. The university, which has been the core of Israel's tech industry has been suffering in recent years from budget cuts.

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Israeli 'virtual cancer' engine accurately predicts breast cancer patients' response to treatment
Israeli biotechnology start-up Optimata has won a seal of approval for its new computerized virtual cancer patient technology from Cancer Research UK after a successful trial at Nottingham City Hospital. In the joint clinical study held by Optimata and Cancer UK, it was found that Optimata's Virtual Cancer Patient Engine (VCP) enabled doctors to correctly predict how individual breast cancer patients will respond to chemotherapy treatment in 70 percent of cases. This is substantially higher than the current prediction accuracy of oncologists which is estimated to be 25-30 percent.
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INTRODUCING… INTRODUCING… INTRODUCING… INTRODUCING… INTRODUCING…

BIO NORTH - "Northern Israel Life sciences and Biotechnology Network"


A Northern Cluster for Biotechnology Industries’ has been initiated by the S. Neaman Institute in order to promote collaboration between northern biotechnological companies and academic researchers. The rational for that initiative was twofold: (i) research in biotechnology is being conducted all over the world in clusters and (ii) biotechnology and biomedical engineering have become the fastest growing industrial sectors worldwide, and are reshaping science, especially in the life, medical, food and agricultural sciences.
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