Nasa trade-off Das


NASA key to Aeronautics- general



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NASA key to Aeronautics- general




NASA critical to aeronautics.



Watkins et al 06 (Todd, PhD-Harvard and director-Lehigh University’s Institute for Entrepreneurship, Creativity and Innovation, with ALAN SCHRIESHEIM and STEPHEN MERRILL, Glide Path to Irrelevance: Federal Funding for Aeronautics, http://www.issues.org/23.1/watkins.html)
To us, this is stunning neglect of the national interest in the future of aeronautics technologies. At current and proposed funding levels, NASA and the nation cannot hope to come close to fulfilling national needs in the face of an already strained air transportation system; fierce and increasing international competition in aircraft markets; the environmental challenges of noise, emissions, and fuel efficiency; and demands for improved air safety and homeland security. NASA’s ARMD is the nation’s only organizationally and technically capable option for overall leadership in aeronautics technologies. Unfortunately, it is largely hidden from public view, structurally, financially, and politically buried in a space agency on a mission to Mars. How many additional hundreds of millions of delayed air travelers, or how many more national commissions warning about the perilous future of U.S. aeronautics, will it take to get policymakers to put the A back in NASA?

More ev.



Watkins et al 06 (Todd, PhD-Harvard and director-Lehigh University’s Institute for Entrepreneurship, Creativity and Innovation, with ALAN SCHRIESHEIM and STEPHEN MERRILL, Glide Path to Irrelevance: Federal Funding for Aeronautics, http://www.issues.org/23.1/watkins.html)
National needs fall into four broad areas. The first three involve classic public or quasi-public goods in which there is little disagreement that the federal government should play a central role. These categories are air traffic control, emissions and noise reduction, and air safety and security. In practice, the central federal role falls to NASA. No other organization remotely has the capabilities. Were it not for NASA, little R&D would be performed, key supporting infrastructure would not exist, and new technologies would not be developed because the benefits appropriable by private enterprise are too limited or too widely diffused to attract investment. The fourth category centers on commercial competitiveness. Here, there is much more policy debate about the role of the federal aeronautics enterprise. And the ideological tone of this debate carries over to, and dwarfs and distorts, discussion of the other three areas.

Colonization Link




Colonization programs tradeoff with aeronautics research.



Aviation Week 06 (NASA Budget Stretched Too Thin, National Academies Says, May 5, http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/story_generic.jsp?channel=space&id=news/NASB05056.xml&headline=NASA%20Budget%20Stretched%20Too%20Thin,%20National%20Academies%20Says)
NASA can't accomplish all that is on its plate with its current and projected budgets, and science at the agency is threatened as it bears the brunt, according to a new report from the National Academies' Space Studies Board (SSB). "NASA is being asked to accomplish too much with too little," the May 4 report says. "The agency does not have the necessary resources to carry out the tasks of completing the International Space Station, returning humans to the moon, maintaining vigorous [science] programs, and sustaining capabilities in aeronautical research." NASA plans to cut science by $3.1 billion from 2007 through 2011, as compared to the projections that accompanied the fiscal 2006 NASA budget request, to address a shortfall in the space shuttle's budget as that program attempts to complete the ISS and retire in 2010. The budget request for NASA's science mission directorate in FY '07 is $5.33 billion, and is set to grow at less than the rate of inflation for the next several years, the report says. "We are particularly concerned that the shortfall in funding for science has fallen disproportionately on small missions and on funding for basic research and technology," SSB Chairman Lennard Fisk said in a statement. "These actions run the risk of disrupting the pipeline of human capital and technology that is essential for the future success of the space program."

I/L Aerospace industry key to Econ

Obama agrees aerospace is the best internal link to the economy- the sector supports the most jobs


ITA ’11 [International Trade Administration, “AEROSPACE INDUSTRY IS CRITICAL CONTRIBUTOR TO U.S. ECONOMY ACCORDING TO OBAMA TRADE OFFICIAL AT PARIS AIR SHOW,” http://trade.gov/press/press-releases/2011/aerospace-industry-critical-contributor-to-us-economy-062111.asp, DA 7/14/11]//RS
PARIS – Francisco Sánchez, Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade, addressed national and international groups at the 2011 Paris Air Show to reinforce the President’s National Export Initiative (NEI) and support the U.S. aerospace industry. “The U.S. aerospace industry is a strategic contributor to the economy, national security, and technological innovation of the United States,” Sánchez said. “The industry is key to achieving the President’s goals of doubling exports by the end of 2014 and contributed $78 billion in export sales to the U.S. economy in 2010.” During the U.S. Pavilion opening remarks, Sánchez noted that the aerospace sector in the United States supports more jobs through exports than any other industry. Sánchez witnessed a signing ceremony between Boeing and Aeroflot, Russia’s state-owned airline. Aeroflot has ordered eight 777s valued at $2.1 billion, and the sales will support approximately 14,000 jobs. “The 218 American companies represented in the U.S. International Pavilion demonstrate the innovation and hard work that make us leaders in this sector,” said Sánchez. “I am particularly pleased to see the incredible accomplishments of U.S. companies participating in the Alternative Aviation Fuels Showcase, which demonstrates our leadership in this important sector and shows that we are on the right path to achieving the clean energy future envisioned by President Obama.” The 2011 Paris Air Show is the world’s largest aerospace trade exhibition, and features 2,000 exhibitors, 340,000 visitors, and 200 international delegations. The U.S. aerospace industry ranks among the most competitive in the world, boasting a positive trade balance of $44.1 billion – the largest trade surplus of any U.S. manufacturing industry. It directly sustains about 430,000 jobs, and indirectly supports more than 700,000 additional jobs. Ninety-one percent of U.S. exporters of aerospace products are small and medium-sized firms.

Aerospace industry key to the already faltering economy.


Watkins, Schriesheim, and Merrill. 2006. (Todd Watkins is associate professor of economics in the College of Business and Economics at Lehigh University, Alan Schriesheim is director emeritus of Argonne National Laboratory, and Stephen Merrill is executive director of the National Academies’ Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy. “Glide Path to Irrelevance: Federal Funding for Aeronautics” http://www.issues.org/23.1/watkins.html ) hss
Nonetheless, recent signs that the nation’s preeminence in aviation may be imperiled have occasioned deep concern. At least 12 studies of U.S. activity in aeronautics published during the past half decade by the National Academies and various industry and government bodies have called attention to the vulnerability of the United States’ traditional leading position. In its final report, the Commission on the Future of the United States Aerospace Industry, widely known as the Walker Commission, stated that “the critical underpinnings of this nation’s aerospace industry are showing signs of faltering” and warned bluntly, “We stand dangerously close to squandering the advantage bequeathed to us by prior generations of aerospace leaders.” In 2005, the National Aerospace Institute, in a report commissioned by Congress, declared the center of technical and market leadership to be “shifting outside the United States” to Europe, with a loss of high-paying jobs and intellectual capital to the detriment of the United States’ economic well-being. The clear message is that the United States must overcome a series of major challenges—to the capacity, safety, and security of the nation’s air transportation system, to the nation’s ability to compete in international markets, and to the need to reduce noise and emissions—if the nation’s viability in this sector, let alone international leadership, is to be ensured.
American aerospace is the best internal link to economic growth— jobs and exports
Albaugh, 4/27 [Jim Albaugh, President & CEO, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Annual Aviation Summit, U.S. Chamber of Commerce, April 27, 2011, “Keeping America’s Lead in Aerospace,” DA 7/30/11]//RS
To me, American aerospace defined the 20 th Century. It helped win World War II. It brought the world closer together with commercial air travel. It changed the way we communicate with commercial satellites. And, of course, it changed forever how we look at the world around us when man first walked on the Moon. I am also convinced that aerospace will define the 21 st century. The question is, will it be U.S. aerospace that does it? That’s a critical question because what we do helps keep America strong. No industry has a bigger impact on exports. It tips the balance of trade in our favor by about $53 billion. President Obama has set the goal of doubling U.S. exports in five years. Aerospace will be essential to help us reach that goal. When you look at direct 1and secondary impacts, it's been estimated that U.S. civil aviation alone is responsible for 12 million jobs and contributes to more than 5 1/2 percent of the US GDP.
US aerospace key to economic growth, hegemony, and international cooperation
Blakey, 7/27 [Ms. Marion C. Blakey, President and CEO Aerospace Industries Association of America, “Statement for the Record: Bureaucratic Obstacles for Small Exporters: Is our National Export Strategy Working?,” July 27, 2011, http://www.aia-aerospace.org/assets/statement_07272011.pdf, DA 7/30/11]//RS
The U.S. aerospace industry is second to none. The trade surplus our industry has earned and the hundreds of thousands of jobs it supports will play a critical role in our nation’s economic recovery. Aerospace exports fuel the health of our companies and the competitiveness of the most innovative industrial base in the world. Our nation reaps the benefits of aerospace exports in the form of enhanced national security and economic growth. The government-industry partnership supporting aerospace exports is crucial, and cannot be taken for granted. In the absence of the type of dialogue and collaboration practiced by this committee and its leadership, it is easy to miss opportunities or even damage international cooperation with our friends and allies overseas.

Strong aerospace key to economic growth, readiness, and building international relationships


Blakey, 7/27 [Ms. Marion C. Blakey, President and CEO Aerospace Industries Association of America, “Statement for the Record: Bureaucratic Obstacles for Small Exporters: Is our National Export Strategy Working?,” July 27, 2011, http://www.aia-aerospace.org/assets/statement_07272011.pdf, DA 7/30/11]//RS
Why Do Aerospace Exports Matter? More than a third of the $214.5 billion in U.S. aerospace sales of civil, space, and defense products last year went to overseas customers. In these challenging economic times, it is necessary but not sufficient to highlight that these exports create and sustain high-skill, high-wage jobs. It is equally, if not more critical to recognize that these exports are necessary to sustain and increase the capacity for cutting-edge innovation in the U.S. industrial base. The parts and components used to develop, produce and sustain these systems sold overseas are sourced from thousands of small- and medium-sized companies who use this revenue to invest in their future global competitiveness. We must therefore continue to compete effectively in the international marketplace to expedite our economic recovery and set a future trajectory for even greater economic growth. Exports help AIA members provide the Americans defending our country and guarding our homeland with the best technology at the best price for the U.S. taxpayer. Exports support technology exchange, allowing our industry to leverage foreign innovation to make our own world-class products even better. Exports also lower unit costs for systems and components. In challenging economic times, overseas sales keep critical 2 production lines open and available to meet the threats we face now and will face in the future. Aerospace exports also serve as a foundation for building key relationships and a shared future with important international allies and partners. American aviation products and services are at the forefront of providing to the world safe, reliable and environmentally responsible air travel. Our space industry connects the globe, helping us communicate, navigate and explore with other nations. As the United States asks its allies to take on greater responsibility in a shared effort to protect international security and stability, it is imperative that these key partners be equipped with and trained on the appropriate systems and technologies to ensure engagement and interoperability with U.S. and other coalition forces.

The Aerospace industry is a key exporter in the US economy and supports over 1 million jobs


US Department of Commerce, 11 [June 21, 2011, “Aerospace Industry is Critical Contributor to U.S. Economy According to Obama Trade Official at Paris Air Show”, http://trade.gov/press/press-releases/2011/aerospace-industry-critical-contributor-to-us-economy-062111.asp, DA 7/30/11]//RS
The U.S. aerospace industry is a strategic contributor to the economy, national security, and technological innovation of the United States,” Sánchez said. “The industry is key to achieving the President’s goals of doubling exports by the end of 2014 and contributed $78 billion in export sales to the U.S. economy in 2010.” During the U.S. Pavilion opening remarks, Sánchez noted that the aerospace sector in the United States supports more jobs through exports than any other industry. Sánchez witnessed a signing ceremony between Boeing and Aeroflot, Russia’s state-owned airline. Aeroflot has ordered eight 777s valued at $2.1 billion, and the sales will support approximately 14,000 jobs. “The 218 American companies represented in the U.S. International Pavilion demonstrate the innovation and hard work that make us leaders in this sector,” said Sánchez. “I am particularly pleased to see the incredible accomplishments of U.S. companies participating in the Alternative Aviation Fuels Showcase, which demonstrates our leadership in this important sector and shows that we are on the right path to achieving the clean energy future envisioned by President Obama.” The 2011 Paris Air Show is the world’s largest aerospace trade exhibition, and features 2,000 exhibitors, 340,000 visitors, and 200 international delegations. The U.S. aerospace industry ranks among the most competitive in the world, boasting a positive trade balance of $44.1 billion – the largest trade surplus of any U.S. manufacturing industry. It directly sustains about 430,000 jobs, and indirectly supports more than 700,000 additional jobs. Ninety-one percent of U.S. exporters of aerospace products are small and medium-sized firms.


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