Pre-K–hs world Languages and Foreign Languages Core Course Objectives



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Pre-K–HS World Languages and Foreign Languages

Core Course Objectives



Core Course Objectives (CCOs) are statements that:

  • describe different elements of core, essential content (knowledge, skills, or abilities);

  • are pulled, created, or synthesized from a larger set of curriculum standards; and

  • clarify key knowledge, skills, and abilities that many educators and other content experts working together agree are most critical in that content area, grade, or course.

Each CCO should be high-level and represent broad enough learning goals to be taught using a wide variety of instructional tools or methods (scope), while also focused enough that students’ growth in learning that knowledge or skill can be measured by an assessment (assess-ability).


The Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (ESE) partnered with WestEd to convene panels of expert educators to review and develop statements of essential curriculum content, Core Course Objectives (CCOs), for approximately 100 different grades/subjects and courses.

In conjunction with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, the CCOs were used by a team of WestEd evaluators to ensure content alignment in the identification and evaluation of example assessments suitable for use as District-Determined Measures (DDMs). Districts can utilize the CCOs themselves or the process of developing CCOs in their own work when selecting DDMs.

At each meeting, educators developed high-quality CCOs that met the following criteria:


  • Scope: The CCO describes an overarching learning goal.

  • Assess-ability: The CCO describes knowledge, skills, or abilities that are readily able to be measured.

  • Centrality: The CCO describes a critically important concept, skill, or ability that is central to the subject/grade or course.

  • Relevance: The CCO represents knowledge, skills, and abilities that are consistent with Massachusetts’s values and goals.

After public review, WestEd’s content specialists reviewed the comments submitted by educators and other stakeholders. The CCOs that emerged from this process are presented below.

World Languages – Grades: Pre-K–1


#

Objective

1


Students ask and answer questions.

For example, students ask and answer questions in single word/words about self, including name, age, and city or town in which they live, using the target language.



2

Students express likes and dislikes.

For example, students respond to likes and dislikes on familiar topics, such as food and animals, using the target language.



3

Students follow directions.

For example, students follow simple classroom directions through Total Physical Response (TPR), such as sit down and stand up, given in the target language.



4

Students obtain information and knowledge.

For example, students obtain information, such as size, color, shape, or amount, in the target language.



5

Students express needs and emotions.

For example, students express needs and emotions in the target language, such as asking for water or use of the bathroom, and express being happy or sad.



6

Students describe people, places, and things.

For example, students describe people (such as family members), places (such as home or school), and things (such as classroom objects), using single word/words in the target language.



7

Students use appropriate words, phrases, expressions, and gestures in interactions.

For example, students use culturally appropriate greetings, farewells, and school (classroom) routines, using the target language.



8

Students interact appropriately in group cultural activities.

For example, students interact appropriately as participants in the target culture’s games, storytelling, and celebrations.



9

Students identify distinctive cultural products from the target culture.

For example, students identify culturally distinctive toys, foods, and games in the target culture.



10

Students identify cultural characteristics of the target culture.

For example, students identify cultural characteristics using pictures and cultural realia in the target culture.



11

Students obtain information and knowledge related to other disciplines.

For example, students reinforce number concepts in the target language by manipulating numbers one through ten, such as in counting or adding.



12

Students experience the target language and culture beyond the classroom setting.

For example, students provide age-appropriate feedback using a rubric on a performance presented in the target language, such as a puppet show, musical presentation, or dance.




Note: These Core Course Objectives (CCOs) were developed by Massachusetts educators in summer 2013. They are intended to provide districts with information about the content taught in this course. Source document used is as follows: Massachusetts Foreign Languages Curriculum Framework (1999).

Note: The curriculum framework for this subject describes standards for a particular grade span (e.g., pre-K–1). For this reason, the CCOs were developed for each grade span, not each grade level.

World Languages – Grades: 2–4


#

Objective

1


Students ask and answer questions.

For example, students greet and respond to greetings by making acquaintance with their classmates using the target language.



2

Students exchange information and knowledge.

For example, students describe common friends, places they know or visit, and favorite or familiar items using single word/words in the target language.



3

Students understand some ideas and familiar details.

For example, students sequence a story using picture cards in the target language.



4

Students obtain information and knowledge.

For example, students categorize content in the target language based on presented familiar information.



5

Students express opinions and ideas.

For example, students express a preference among familiar objects, events, subjects, etc., in the target language.



6

Students present information in a brief report.

For example, students illustrate and label objects or geographical features (e.g., mountain/river/rocks, and classroom items) in the target language.



7

Students use appropriate words, phrases, expressions, and gestures in interactions, such as greetings, farewells, school routines, and other daily activities.

For example, students recognize and recreate, when appropriate, various target cultural practices (e.g., handshake, the siesta, and the daily schedule), using the target language.



8

Students identify distinctive cultural aspects of the target culture presented in stories, dramas, films, and photographs.

For example, students use single word/words to compare and contrast target cultural aspects (e.g., traditions, foods, clothes, holidays, people), using the target language.



9

Students demonstrate knowledge of the target culture’s geography by naming features, such as rivers, mountains, cities, and climates on maps.

For example, students name, locate, and label target culture-speaking countries and cities of the world on a world map.



10

Students give examples of ways in which the target language differs from, and is similar to, English.

For example, students use single word/words (e.g., same or different) to compare and contrast the use of punctuation and special symbols in English and in the target language.



11

Students obtain information and knowledge related to other disciplines from sources in the target language.

For example, students acquire knowledge from authentic language sources about animals from the target culture and make comparisons in the target language based on a graphic representation of students’ research.



12

Students apply knowledge of the target language and culture beyond the classroom setting.

For example, students exchange realia (e.g., drawings, short letters) and share them, using the target language with students in another academic setting.




Note: These Core Course Objectives (CCOs) were developed by Massachusetts educators in summer 2013. They are intended to provide districts with information about the content taught in this course. Source document used is as follows: Massachusetts Foreign Languages Curriculum Framework (1999).

Note: The curriculum framework for this subject describes standards for a particular grade span (e.g., 2–4). For this reason, the CCOs were developed for each grade span, not each grade level.

World Languages – Grades: 5–6


#

Objective

1


Students ask and answer questions.

For example, students ask and answer questions pertaining to salutations (e.g., name, age, and other personal information) in a short sentence(s) in the target language.



2

Students express likes and dislikes.

For example, students ask and answer questions pertaining to likes, dislikes, and preferences for food, sports, activities, etc., in the target language.



3

Students follow directions.

For example, students follow a short sequence of spoken directions to complete a task (e.g., sit down, take out your book, turn to page four) given in the target language.



4

Students obtain information and knowledge.

For example, students gather information from a written or spoken message, such as a note from a friend to make plans for an activity, given in the target language.



5

Students describe people, places, and things.

For example, students describe people, places, and things in writing and conversation in a short sentence(s) in the target language.



6

Students write lists or short notes.

For example, students write a list of what they need (e.g., school supplies, groceries), using the target language.



7

Students use appropriate words, phrases, expressions and gestures in interactions, such as greetings, farewells, school routines, and other daily activities.

For example, students verbally and physically demonstrate appropriate forms of greetings to people they know and do not know well, using the target culture and language.



8

Students identify distinctive cultural products from the target culture, such as toys, clothes, foods, currencies, games, traditional crafts, and musical instruments.

For example, students demonstrate appropriate language and behaviors for shopping in a market, including knowledge of currency, in the target language and culture.



9

Students demonstrate knowledge of the target culture’s geography by naming the features.

For example, students identify major mountains and rivers on a map of a target language country.



10

Students identify linguistic characteristics of the target language and compare and contrast them with English linguistic characteristics.

For example, students identify grammatical categories, such as tense, gender, and agreement, in the target language and in English.



11

Students obtain information and knowledge related to other disciplines from sources in the target language.

For example, students read level-appropriate text in the target language about artists from the target language community and present the information in a short sentence(s) in the target language.



12

Students apply knowledge of the target language and culture beyond the classroom setting.

For example, students communicate electronically (e.g., email, videoconference) with students from a target language community, using the target language.




Note: These Core Course Objectives (CCOs) were developed by Massachusetts educators in summer 2013. They are intended to provide districts with information about the content taught in this course. Source document used is as follows: Massachusetts Foreign Languages Curriculum Framework (1999).

Note: The curriculum framework for this subject describes standards for a particular grade span (e.g., 5–6). For this reason, the CCOs were developed for each grade span, not each grade level.

World Languages – Grades: 7–8


#

Objective

1


Students ask and answer questions.

For example, students ask and answer questions pertaining to salutations (e.g., name, age, grade, and other personal information) in the target language.



2

Students express likes and dislikes.

For example, students ask and answer questions in a string of short sentences pertaining to likes, dislikes, and preferences for food, sports, leisure activities, etc., in the target language.



3

Students follow directions.

For example, students follow a sequence of spoken directions in the target language to complete a task (e.g., fold the paper in half, open it, fold it again in half other way, now you draw a picture story in four boxes).



4

Students obtain information and knowledge.

For example, students gather information from a written or spoken message, such as an email or a phone message from a friend to make plans for an activity, given in the target language.



5

Students describe people, place, and things.

For example, students describe people, places, and things, using a string of short sentences in writing and conversation in the target language.



6

Students write lists or short notes.

For example, students write a list of what they need (e.g., list of food/things to do for a birthday party), using the target language.



7

Students use appropriate words, phrases, expressions, and gestures in interactions, such as greetings, farewells, school routines, and other daily activities.

For example, students verbally and physically demonstrate appropriate forms of greetings to people they know and do not know well, using the target culture and language.



8

Students identify distinctive cultural products from the target culture, such as toys, clothes, foods, currencies, games, traditional crafts, and musical instruments.

For example, students demonstrate appropriate language and behaviors for flying kites, in the target language and culture.



9

Students demonstrate knowledge of the target culture’s geography by naming its geographical features.

For example, students name major mountains, rivers, and other salient geographic features on a map of a target language country.



10

Students identify linguistic characteristics of the target language and compare and contrast them with English linguistic characteristics.

For example, students identify grammatical categories, such as tense, gender, and agreement, in the target language and in English.



11

Students obtain information and knowledge related to other disciplines from sources in the target language.

For example, students read level-appropriate text in the target language about lives in a tropical rain forest and present the information in a string of short sentences.



12

Students apply knowledge of the target language and culture beyond the classroom setting.

For example, students communicate electronically (e.g., email, Skype) with students from a target language community using the target language.




Note: These Core Course Objectives (CCOs) were developed by Massachusetts educators in summer 2013. They are intended to provide districts with information about the content taught in this course. Source document used is as follows: Massachusetts Foreign Languages Curriculum Framework (1999).

Note: The curriculum framework for this subject describes standards for a particular grade span (e.g., 7–8). For this reason, the CCOs were developed for each grade span, not each grade level.

Foreign Languages/French I–II – Grade: HS


#

Objective

1


Students participate in initial interactions with others, such as greetings and introductions, using appropriate words and expressions.

2

Students exchange essential information, such as greetings, leave-takings, and common classroom routines, using culturally appropriate expressions and gestures.

3

Students ask and answer questions about topics, such as family, school events, and celebrations, orally or in writing.

4

Students make and respond to requests.

5

Students exchange opinions or information about their personal lives or other people, activities, or events, using descriptive language.

6

Students identify some ideas, with accompanying details, in highly contextualized authentic or adapted texts.

7

Students describe or interpret information from reading or listening to simple stories or informational texts.

8

Students comprehend the main themes and ideas of written and spoken/audio texts from authentic and/or adapted sources.

9

Students demonstrate understanding by following instructions or directions.

10

Students express personal opinions, needs, or emotions.

11

Students present descriptive information about people, places, or things.

12

Students write short reports about people and things and present them to an audience.

13

Students write passages that range from lists, messages, and short notes to simple paragraphs.

14

Students exchange descriptions and opinions of tangible products of the culture, such as toys, dress, types of dwellings, and foods, orally or in writing.

15

Students identify distinctive aspects of the target culture, such as food, music, or daily life.

16

Students identify distinctive contributions made by people in the target culture.

17

Students demonstrate knowledge of the target culture’s geography.


Note: These Core Course Objectives were developed by Massachusetts educators in summer 2013. They are intended to provide districts with information about the content taught in this course. Source documents used are as follows: Massachusetts Foreign Languages Curriculum Framework (1999); American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL).

Foreign Languages/French III–IV – Grade: HS


#

Objective

1


Students interact with others, asking or answering questions to initiate, maintain, or end conversations, orally or in writing, using strings of sentences with sentence “connectors” or tag questions.

2

Students ask and respond to questions to ask for, give, and clarify information.

3

Students verbally exchange information or opinions about people, activities, or events, as presented in authentic materials.

4

Students exchange opinions about people, activities, or events in a variety of situational contexts, orally or in writing.

5

Students identify main ideas, with accompanying details, from a variety of appropriately contextualized multimedia sources.

6

Students describe or interpret information gained from reading articles in a magazine, journal, or newspaper.

7

Students describe or interpret texts written in a variety of time frames.

8

Students read, listen to, and comprehend authentic and adapted materials, such as short stories, narratives, advertisements, and brochures.

9

Students comprehend and react appropriately to learned expressions, sentences, questions, polite commands, and directions in both oral and written messages.

10

Students give oral or written presentations on planned activities or cultural topics, such as current events, literature, and historical and biographical texts.

11

Students describe or recount essential elements (e.g., characters, settings, events) as found in a variety of fiction or nonfiction sources.

12

Students write greeting cards, notes, letters, and emails to specific audiences.

13

Students describe distinctive contributions made by people in the target cultures.

14

Students interact appropriately in the target language in representative social and cultural activities, using register appropriate to audience and reflecting understanding of the mores of the target cultures.

15

Students provide examples of how target cultures vary among francophone countries, for example, geographically, politically, demographically, and economically.


Note: These Core Course Objectives were developed by Massachusetts educators in summer 2013. They are intended to provide districts with information about the content taught in this course. Source document used is as follows: Massachusetts Foreign Languages Curriculum Framework (1999).

Foreign Languages/Latin I–II – Grade: HS


#

Objective

1


Students identify and use linguistic elements of Latin to increase knowledge of students’ own language.

2

Students understand some ideas and familiar details from annotated ancient sources.

3

Students obtain and convey information and knowledge about daily life in Ancient Rome.

4

Students identify distinctive contributions made by people in Ancient Rome.

5

Students read and interpret highly adapted texts from authentic Roman sources.

6

Students identify and discuss cultural characteristics of Ancient Rome, and compare and contrast them with modern Western cultural characteristics.

7

Students ask and answer questions in Latin, orally and in writing, to clarify information in response to class readings from teacher-adapted or authentic sources.

8

Students translate simple written passages from Latin to English and from English to Latin, both orally and in writing.

9

Students compose simple written passages in Latin, using correct grammar and syntax, in response to a writing prompt.

10

Students read aloud from authentic texts written in Latin in order to practice proper pronunciation and phrasing.


Note: These Core Course Objectives were developed by Massachusetts educators in summer 2013. They are intended to provide districts with information about the content taught in this course. Source documents used are as follows: Massachusetts Foreign Languages Curriculum Framework (1999); The American Classical League and The American Philological Association, Standards for Classical Language Learning (1997).

Foreign Languages/Latin III – Grade: HS


#

Objective

1


Students understand important ideas and details in highly contextualized authentic and adapted ancient texts.

2

Students identify meaning of adapted and/or authentic ancient passages in Latin and relate them to personal experiences.

3

Students identify cultural perspectives and patterns of social behavior that are typical of Ancient Rome.

4

Students identify historical and/or cultural figures from Ancient Rome and describe their contributions.

5

Students read authentic and adapted ancient materials, such as literary and nonliterary excerpts, letters, epigrams, epitaphs, graffiti, and inscriptions.

6

Students identify linguistic characteristics of Latin, and compare and contrast them with English linguistic characteristics.

7

Students ask and answer questions in Latin, orally and in writing, in response to class readings from teacher-adapted or authentic sources.

8

Students translate simple written passages from Latin to English and from English to Latin, both orally and in writing.

9

Students compose simple written passages in Latin, using correct grammar and syntax, in response to a writing prompt.

10

Students will read aloud from authentic texts written in Latin in order to practice proper pronunciation and phrasing.


Note: These Core Course Objectives were developed by Massachusetts educators in summer 2013. They are intended to provide districts with information about the content taught in this course. Source documents used are as follows: Massachusetts Foreign Languages Curriculum Framework (1999); The American Classical League and The American Philological Association, Standards for Classical Language Learning (1997).

Foreign Languages/Spanish I–II – Grade: HS


#

Objective

1


Students participate in initial interactions with others, such as greetings and introductions, using appropriate words and expressions.

2

Students exchange essential information, such as greetings, leave-takings, and common classroom routines, using culturally appropriate expressions and gestures.

3

Students ask and answer questions about topics, such as family, school events, and celebrations, orally or in writing.

4

Students make and respond to requests.

5

Students exchange opinions or information about their personal lives or other people, activities, or events, using descriptive language.

6

Students identify some ideas with accompanying details in highly contextualized authentic or adapted texts.

7

Students describe or interpret information from reading or listening to simple stories or informational texts.

8

Students comprehend the main themes and ideas of written and spoken/audio texts from authentic and/or adapted sources.

9

Students demonstrate understanding by following instructions or directions.

10

Students express personal opinions, needs, or emotions.

11

Students present descriptive information about people, places, or things.

12

Students write short reports about people and things and present them to an audience.

13

Students write passages that range from lists, messages, and short notes to simple paragraphs.

14

Students exchange descriptions and opinions of tangible products of the culture, such as toys, dress, types of dwellings, and foods, orally or in writing.

15

Students identify distinctive aspects of the target cultures, such as food, music, or daily life.

16

Students identify distinctive contributions made by people in the target cultures.

17

Students demonstrate knowledge of the target culture’s geography.


Note: These Core Course Objectives were developed by Massachusetts educators in summer 2013. They are intended to provide districts with information about the content taught in this course. Source documents used are as follows: Massachusetts Foreign Languages Curriculum Framework (1999); American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL).

Foreign Languages/Spanish III–IV – Grade: HS


#

Objective

1


Students interact with others, asking or answering questions to initiate, maintain, or end conversations, orally or in writing, using strings of sentences with sentence “connectors” or tag questions.

2

Students ask and respond to questions to ask for, give, and clarify information.

3

Students verbally exchange information or opinions about people, activities, or events, as presented in authentic materials.

4

Students exchange opinions about people, activities, or events in a variety of situational contexts, orally or in writing.

5

Students identify main ideas with accompanying details from a variety of appropriately contextualized multimedia sources.

6

Students describe or interpret information gained from reading articles in a magazine, journal, or newspaper.

7

Students describe or interpret texts written in a variety of time frames.

8

Students read, listen to, and comprehend authentic and adapted materials, such as short stories, narratives, advertisements, and brochures.

9

Students comprehend and react appropriately to learned expressions, sentences, questions, polite commands, and directions in both oral and written messages.

10

Students give oral or written presentations on planned activities or cultural topics, such as current events, literature, and historical and biographical texts.

11

Students describe or recount essential elements (e.g., characters, settings, events) as found in a variety of fiction or nonfiction sources.

12

Students write greeting cards, notes, letters, and emails to specific audiences.

13

Students describe distinctive contributions made by people in the target cultures.

14

Students interact appropriately in the target language in representative social and cultural activities, using register appropriate to audience and reflecting understanding of the mores of the target cultures.

15

Students provide examples of how target cultures vary among Hispanophone countries, for example, geographically, politically, demographically, and economically.


Note: These Core Course Objectives were developed by Massachusetts educators in summer 2013. They are intended to provide districts with information about the content taught in this course. Source document used is as follows: Massachusetts Foreign Languages Curriculum Framework (1999).


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