Research project : dr jon patricios (Concussion in rugby playing children)



Download 358.25 Kb.
Page1/6
Date19.10.2016
Size358.25 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6
RESEARCH PROJECT : DR JON PATRICIOS (Concussion in rugby playing children)

Search for: limit 13 to yr=1996-2009


Results: 1-65
Database: Ovid MEDLINE(R) <1950 to November Week 2 2009>

Search Strategy:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 exp brain concussion/ (3646)

2 concuss$.tw. or 1 (4756)

3 rugby.mp. or Football/ (2890)

4 2 and 3 (192)

5 limit 4 to (english language and ("child (6 to 12 years)" or "adolescent (13 to 18 years)")) (72)

6 south africa/ (23890)

7 5 and 6 (4)

8 limit 4 to (english language and "all adult (19 plus years)") (77)

9 8 not 5 (34)

10 school$.af. and 4 (61)

11 limit 10 to (english language and humans) (61)

12 5 and 11 (39)

13 7 or 9 or 12 (74)

14 limit 13 to yr=1996-2009 (65)

15 from 14 keep 1-65 (65)


***************************

Result <1>

Unique Identifier

15140712


Status

MEDLINE


Authors

Jantzen KJ. Anderson B. Steinberg FL. Kelso JA.

Authors Full Name

Jantzen, Kelly J. Anderson, Brian. Steinberg, Fred L. Kelso, J A Scott.

Institution

Florida Atlantic University, Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences, Boca Raton, 33431, USA.

Title

A prospective functional MR imaging study of mild traumatic brain injury in college football players.



Source

Ajnr: American Journal of Neuroradiology. 25(5):738-45, 2004 May.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although concussion is common among athletes, evidence-based methods for clinical evaluation, treatment, and recovery are lacking. We used a prospective, functional neuroimaging approach to assess sports-related concussion in which imaging was performed before injury so that brain changes resulting from concussion could be better understood. METHODS: Neurophysiologic correlates of sports-related concussion were investigated in eight college football players by using functional MR imaging. Preseason baseline levels of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) activity were acquired during the performance of a test battery that included mathematical, memory, and sensorimotor coordination tasks. Four players who had a concussion repeated these baseline procedures within 1 week of injury. The remaining control players were retested at the end of the season. RESULTS: Specific neural signatures of concussion were detected in individual players by comparing post!

concussion results to preconcussion baseline values. The validity of these indicators was confirmed by comparing them with the same measures in noninjured control subjects. When compared with control subjects, concussed players had marked within-subject increases in the amplitude and extent of BOLD activity during a finger-sequencing task. Effects were observed primarily in the parietal and lateral frontal and cerebellar regions. CONCLUSION: Differences in neural functioning were observed in the absence of observed deficits in behavioral performance, suggesting that this approach may increase sensitivity to concussion compared with neuropsychological evaluation alone. Though preliminary, the proposed prospective neuroimaging approach may have great potential for understanding mild traumatic brain injury and identifying mechanisms underlying recovery.

Publication Type

Journal Article. Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S..
Result <2>

Unique Identifier

12960905

Status


MEDLINE

Authors


Zemper ED.

Authors Full Name

Zemper, Eric D.

Institution

Exercise Research Associates, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

Title


Two-year prospective study of relative risk of a second cerebral concussion.

Source


American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. 82(9):653-9, 2003 Sep.

Abstract


OBJECTIVE: To prospectively measure the relative risk of cerebral concussion among those with a history of concussion compared with those having no previous concussions by using a population of high school and college football players. DESIGN: A representative national sample of high school and college football players was followed for two football seasons over a 2-yr period (1997-1998) as part of a national football injury surveillance project. There were a total of 15,304 player-seasons and over 1 million athlete-exposures to the possibility of injury in practices and games; 975 of the player-seasons (6.4%) had a history of concussion in the previous 5 yr. RESULTS: There were 572 concussions recorded, 161 among those with a history (16.5%) and 411 among those with no history (2.9%). Relative risk for individuals with a history of concussion is 5.8 times greater than for individuals with no history (95% confidence interval, 4.8-6.8). CONCLUSION: This large prospective coh!

ort study indicates the risk of sustaining a cerebral concussion is nearly six times greater for individuals with a history of concussion than for individuals with no such history.

Publication Type

Journal Article. Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't.


Result <3>

Unique Identifier

18443276

Status


MEDLINE

Authors


Feeley BT. Kennelly S. Barnes RP. Muller MS. Kelly BT. Rodeo SA. Warren RF.

Authors Full Name

Feeley, Brian T. Kennelly, Steve. Barnes, Ronnie P. Muller, Mark S. Kelly, Bryan T. Rodeo, Scott A. Warren, Russell F.

Institution

Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York, USA.

Title


Epidemiology of National Football League training camp injuries from 1998 to 2007.

Source


American Journal of Sports Medicine. 36(8):1597-603, 2008 Aug.

Abstract


BACKGROUND: Football is one of the leading causes of athletic-related injuries. Injury rates and patterns of the training camp period of the National Football League are unknown. HYPOTHESIS: Injury rates will vary with time, and injury patterns will differ between training camp practices and preseason games. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive epidemiology study. METHODS: From 1998 to 2007, injury data were collected from 1 National Football League team during its training camp period. Injuries were recorded as a strain, sprain, concussion, contusion, fracture/dislocation, or other injury. The injury was further categorized by location on the body. Injury rates were determined based on the exposure of an athlete to a game or practice event. An athlete exposure was defined as 1 athlete participating in 1 practice or game. The injury rate was calculated as the ratio of injuries per 1000 athlete exposures. RESULTS: There were 72.8 (range, 58-109) injuries per year during training camp.!

Injuries were more common during weeks 1 and 2 than during weeks 3 to 5. The rate of injury was significantly higher during games (64.7/1000 athlete exposures) than practices (12.7/1000 athlete exposures, P < .01). The rate of season-ending injuries was also much higher in games (5.4/1000 athlete exposures) than practices (0.4/1000 athlete exposures). The most common injury during the training camp period was a knee sprain, followed by hamstring strains and contusions. CONCLUSION: Muscle strains are the most common injury type in practices. Contact type injuries are most common during pre-season games, and the number of significant injuries that occur during preseason games is high.

Publication Type

Journal Article.


Result <4>

Unique Identifier

17369559

Status


MEDLINE

Authors


Shankar PR. Fields SK. Collins CL. Dick RW. Comstock RD.

Authors Full Name

Shankar, Prasad R. Fields, Sarah K. Collins, Christy L. Dick, Randall W. Comstock, R Dawn.

Institution

The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio, USA.

Title


Epidemiology of high school and collegiate football injuries in the United States, 2005-2006.

Source


American Journal of Sports Medicine. 35(8):1295-303, 2007 Aug.

Abstract


BACKGROUND: Football, one of the most popular sports among male high school students in the United States, is a leading cause of sports-related injuries, with an injury rate almost twice that of basketball, the second most popular sport. HYPOTHESIS: Injury patterns will vary between competition and practice exposures and between levels of play (ie, high school vs. National Collegiate Athletic Association [NCAA]). STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive epidemiology study. METHODS: Football-related injury data were collected over the 2005-2006 school year from 100 nationally representative high schools via High School RIO (Reporting Information Online) and from 55 Division I, II, and III colleges via the NCAA Injury Surveillance System. RESULTS: Nationally, an estimated 517,726 high school football-related injuries (1881 unweighted injuries) occurred during the 2005-2006 season. The rate of injury per 1000 athlete-exposures was greater during high school competitions (12.04) than during !

practices (2.56). The rate of injury per 1000 athlete-exposures was also greater during collegiate competitions (40.23) than during practices (5.77). While the overall rate of injury per 1000 athlete-exposures was greater in the NCAA (8.61) than in high school (4.36), high school football players sustained a greater proportion of fractures and concussions. Running plays were the leading cause of injury, with running backs and linebackers being the positions most commonly injured. CONCLUSION: Patterns of football injuries vary, especially by type of exposure and level of play. Future studies should continue to compare differences in injury patterns in high school and collegiate football, with particular emphasis placed on high-risk plays (running plays) and positions (running backs and linebackers).

Publication Type

Journal Article. Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't. Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S..


Result <5>

Unique Identifier

11032218

Status


MEDLINE

Authors


Guskiewicz KM. Weaver NL. Padua DA. Garrett WE Jr.

Authors Full Name

Guskiewicz, K M. Weaver, N L. Padua, D A. Garrett, W E Jr.

Institution

Department of Exercise and Sport Science, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 27599-8700, USA.

Title


Epidemiology of concussion in collegiate and high school football players.

Source


American Journal of Sports Medicine. 28(5):643-50, 2000 Sep-Oct.

Abstract


Despite evolutionary changes in protective equipment, head injury remains common in football. We investigated concussion in football and associated epidemiologic issues such as 1) incidence of injury, 2) common signs and symptoms, and 3) patterns in making return-to-play decisions. We received 242 of 392 surveys (62%) that were sent to high school and collegiate certified athletic trainers at the beginning of three football seasons. Of the 17,549 football players represented, 888 (5.1%) sustained at least one concussion, and 131 (14.7% of the 888) sustained a second injury during the same season. The greatest incidence of concussion was found at the high school (5.6%) and collegiate division III (5.5%) levels, suggesting that there is an association between level of play and the proportion of players injured. Players who sustained one concussion in a season were three times more likely to sustain a second concussion in the same season compared with uninjured players. Conta!

ct with artificial turf appears to be associated with a more serious concussion than contact with natural grass. Only 8.9% of all injuries involved loss of consciousness, while 86% involved a headache. Overall, 30.8% of all players sustaining a concussion returned to participation on the same day of injury.

Publication Type

Journal Article.


Result <6>

Unique Identifier

18614333

Status


MEDLINE

Authors


Solomon GS. Haase RF.

Authors Full Name

Solomon, Gary S. Haase, Richard F.

Institution

Psychiatric Consultants, P.C., 310 25th Avenue North, Suite 309, Nashville, TN 37203, USA. Gssolomon1@yahoo.com

Title


Biopsychosocial characteristics and neurocognitive test performance in National Football League players: an initial assessment.

Source


Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology. 23(5):563-77, 2008 Sep.

Abstract


The use of neurocognitive testing in the assessment of professional athletes sustaining sports-related concussions has become widespread over the past decade. Baseline neurocognitive testing is now a requirement for athletes in the National Football League (NFL). We present preliminary normative data on a computer based neurocognitive test (Immediate Post Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing; ImPACT) for 159 NFL athletes. Also included are summary data on basic biopsychosocial characteristics, including medical, psychiatric, chemical dependency, concussion, learning disability/attention deficit disorder, and symptom variables, and the relevance of each to baseline neurocognitive test scores.

Publication Type

Journal Article.
Result <7>

Unique Identifier

18585890

Status


MEDLINE

Authors


Shuttleworth-Rdwards AB. Radloff SE.

Authors Full Name

Shuttleworth-Rdwards, Ann B. Radloff, Sarah E.

Institution

Department of Psychology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa. a.edwards@ru.ac.za

Title


Compromised visuomotor processing speed in players of Rugby Union from school through to the national adult level.

Source


Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology. 23(5):511-20, 2008 Sep.

Abstract


The aim of this study was to investigate the residual effects of concussion amongst players of Rugby Union from school through to the national adult level, with pre-season testing on tests of visuomotor processing speed (Digit Symbol; Trail Making Test A and B). Comparison groups included 124 male rugby players versus 102 non-contact sport controls; 71 forward versus 53 backline players. Across groups there was equivalence for age, education, estimated IQ, and hand motor dexterity. There was a significantly higher percentage of rugby players with 2+ concussions than controls. Poorer performance was in evidence for rugby players compared with controls on all tests of visuomotor speed, and for forward versus backline players on Digit Symbol, with clinically relevant medium effect sizes. The results implicate vulnerability amongst rugby players on the prototypically sensitive function of visuomotor processing in association with years of exposure to repetitive concussive and !

subconcussive injury.

Publication Type

Comparative Study. Journal Article. Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't.


Result <8>

Unique Identifier

17507199

Status


MEDLINE

Authors


Hunt TN. Ferrara MS. Miller LS. Macciocchi S.

Authors Full Name

Hunt, Tamerah N. Ferrara, Michael S. Miller, L Stephen. Macciocchi, Stephen.

Institution

Department of Physical Education, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA. hunttn@gwm.sc.edu

Title


The effect of effort on baseline neuropsychological test scores in high school football athletes.

Source


Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology. 22(5):615-21, 2007 Jun.

Abstract


OBJECTIVE: Poor effort on baseline neuropsychological tests is expected to influence interpretation of post-concussion assessment scores. Our study examined effort in an athletic population to determine if poor effort effects neuropsychological test performance. METHODS: High school athletes (N=199) were administered a brief neuropsychological test battery, which included the Dot Counting Test (DCT) and the Rey 15-Item Test with recognition trial. One-way analyses of variance were used to compare groups with adequate and poor effort test performance. RESULTS: Most athletes (N=177; 89%) exerted adequate effort while a number of athletes (N=22; 11%) exerted poor effort on the DCT. Statistically significant differences existed between effort groups (p<0.05) on several of the neuropsychological tests. CONCLUSIONS: Poor effort was observed in the athletic population during baseline testing and athletes with poor effort displayed statistically significant differences in performa!

nce on neuropsychological tests. Adding an effort test to baseline examinations may improve post-concussion test score interpretations.

Publication Type

Journal Article.


Result <9>

Unique Identifier

18180412

Status


MEDLINE

Authors


Collins CL. Micheli LJ. Yard EE. Comstock RD.

Authors Full Name

Collins, Christy L. Micheli, Lyle J. Yard, Ellen E. Comstock, R Dawn.

Institution

Center for Injury Research and Policy, The Research Institute, Nationwide Children's Hospital, 700 Children's Dr, Columbus, OH 43205, USA. christy.collins@nationwidechildrens.org

Title


Injuries sustained by high school rugby players in the United States, 2005-2006.

Source


Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine. 162(1):49-54, 2008 Jan.

Abstract


OBJECTIVES: To describe the incidence and characteristics of injuries among US high school rugby players and to identify possible injury risk factors. DESIGN: Descriptive epidemiological study. SETTING: The 2005 and 2006 US high school rugby seasons. PARTICIPANTS: A convenience sample of 121 boys' and girls' US high school rugby clubs. Main Exposures Exposure to playing rugby. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence, characteristics, and risk factors of rugby injuries. RESULTS: Enrolled clubs reported 594 injuries during 113,641 total high school rugby athletic exposures (81,627 practice exposures and 32,014 match exposures). Rugby injury rates were 5.2 injuries per 1000 total athletic exposures, 1.3 injuries per 1000 practice exposures, and 15.2 injuries per 1000 match exposures. The mean age of the injured athletes was 16.5 years (SD, 1.2 years; range, 13-19 years) and 87.0% were male. The most commonly injured body sites were the head (21.7%), ankle (13.3%), and shoulder (12.8!

%). Fractures (16.0%), concussions (15.8%), and ligament sprains (incomplete tears) (15.7%) were the most common diagnoses. Practice and competition injuries were similar with respect to the proportion of concussions and head, shoulder, ankle, and knee injuries. More than half of all injuries resulted from being tackled (30.8%) and tackling (28.8%). CONCLUSIONS: As the popularity of youth rugby continues to grow in the United States, increasing numbers of physicians and certified athletic trainers will find themselves treating rugby-related injuries and answering questions from parents about the comparative safety of rugby. To our knowledge, this is the first large-scale study to describe injury rates and identify possible injury risk factors among US high school rugby players.

Publication Type

Journal Article. Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't.


Result <10>

Unique Identifier

9022428

Status


MEDLINE

Authors


McCrory PR. Bladin PF. Berkovic SF.

Authors Full Name

McCrory, P R. Bladin, P F. Berkovic, S F.

Institution

Department of Medicine (Neurology), University of Melbourne, Austin, Australia.

Title


Retrospective study of concussive convulsions in elite Australian rules and rugby league footballers: phenomenology, aetiology, and outcome.[see comment].

Comments


Comment in: BMJ. 1997 Apr 26;314(7089):1283; PMID: 9154057, Comment in: BMJ. 1997 Apr 26;314(7089):1283; PMID: 9154058, Comment in: BMJ. 1997 Jan 18;314(7075):158-9; PMID: 9022419

Source


BMJ. 314(7075):171-4, 1997 Jan 18.

Other ID


Source: NLM. PMC2125700

Abstract


OBJECTIVES: To study the ictal phenomenology, aetiology, and outcome of convulsions occurring within seconds of impact in violent collision sport. DESIGN: Retrospective identification of convulsions associated with concussive brain injury from case records from medical officers of football clubs over a 15 year period. SUBJECTS: Elite Australian rules and rugby league footballers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Neuroimaging studies, electroencephalography, neuropsychological test data, and statistics on performance in matches to determine presence of structural or functional brain injury. Clinical follow up and electroencephalography for evidence of epilepsy. RESULTS: Twenty two cases of concussive convulsions were identified with four events documented on television videotape. Convulsions began within 2 seconds of impact and comprised an initial period of tonic stiffening followed by myoclonic jerks of all limbs lasting up to 150 seconds. Some asymmetry in the convulsive manifesta!

tions was common, and recovery of consciousness was rapid. No structural or permanent brain injury was present on clinical assessment, neuropsychological testing, or neuroimaging studies. All players returned to elite competition within two weeks of the incident. Epilepsy did not develop in any player over a mean (range) follow up of 3.5 (1-13) years. CONCLUSIONS: These concussive or impact convulsions are probably a non-epileptic phenomenon, somewhat akin to convulsive syncope. The mechanism may be a transient traumatic functional decerebration. In concussive convulsions the outcome is universally good, antiepileptic treatment is not indicated, and prolonged absence from sport is unwarranted.

Publication Type

Case Reports. Journal Article. Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't.


Result <11>

Unique Identifier

17577714

Status


MEDLINE

Authors


De Beaumont L. Brisson B. Lassonde M. Jolicoeur P.

Authors Full Name

De Beaumont, Louis. Brisson, Benoit. Lassonde, Maryse. Jolicoeur, Pierre.

Institution

Centre de Recherche en Neuropsychologie et Cognition, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Canada. louis.de.beaumont@umontreal.ca

Title


Long-term electrophysiological changes in athletes with a history of multiple concussions.

Source


Brain Injury. 21(6):631-44, 2007 Jun.

Abstract


PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: This event-related potentials study investigated the long-term effects associated with a history of one or multiple concussions on the N2pc and P3 components using a visual search oddball paradigm. METHODS AND PROCEDURE: A total of 47 university football players were assigned to three experimental groups based on prior concussion history: Athletes with a history of one concussion (single-concussion group); Athletes with two or more concussions (multi-concussion group); non-concussed athletic controls. The average post-concussion period was 31 months for athletes in the multi-concussion group and 59 months for the single-concussion group. RESULTS: This study found significantly suppressed P3 amplitude in the multi-concussed athletes group compared to the single-concussion and non-concussed athletes even when using the time since the latest concussion as a covariate. CONCLUSION: This finding suggests that the multi-concussed athletes group showed long-last!

ing P3 amplitude suppression when compared with single-concussion or non-concussed athletes despite equivalent neuropsychological test scores and post-concussion symptoms self-reports. This pattern of results is important because it shows that 'old' concussions do not cause general or ubiquitous electrophysiological suppression. The specificity of the long-term effects of previous concussions to the P3, along with an intact N2pc response, suggests that further work may allow one to pinpoint the cognitive system that is specifically affected by multiple concussions.



Download 358.25 Kb.

Share with your friends:
  1   2   3   4   5   6




The database is protected by copyright ©ininet.org 2020
send message

    Main page