Take Cover Words project overview



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Take Cover

Words project overview


Lesson

Topic

Order

Framework + NC ref.

Learning objective


Success criteria

HW option

Duration

1

Making words negative by adding a prefix

Can be done at any point prior to 5 and 6.

9.3

2.3w


To understand the way negative prefixes change the meaning of words.


Able to add prefixes to root words in order to change the meaning of a passage.





1 lesson

2

Long and short vowels

Can be done at any point prior to 6.

9.3

2.3w


To understand the different sounds individual vowels have in different circumstances and use this knowledge to write a poem.

Able to pick out long and short vowels and use this understanding to write a poem using assonance.





1 lesson

3

The origins of Latin names in science

Can be done at any point prior to 6.

9.3

2.3w


To understand the relationship between Latin and Modern English, especially in terms of scientific language.

Able to show understanding of the influence of Latin on Modern English.




1 lesson

4

Homo-phones

Can be done at any point prior to 6.

9.3

2.3w


To differentiate between homophones and implement the appropriate words in the appropriate context.

Able to identify the homophones that pose difficulties and begin to find methods of dealing with them.




1 lesson

5

Word families

Must have completed 1 first; then, any point prior to 6.

9.3

2.3w


To understand the relationships between words and begin to use this understanding to approach new words.

Completed a word web that shows the connections between word families. Able to explain these connections. Invented new words using knowledge about the meanings of prefixes, roots and suffixes.

Yes

1 lesson

6

Sharing it!

To be completed after 1–5.

9.3, 8.6

2.3 p & w



To demonstrate increased understanding of spelling, word families, roots and derivations.

Devised resources for younger children to help them learn about spelling, word families, roots and definitions.

Yes

Up to 3 lessons

Teacher sheet
1 A negative reaction?


Teacher input required

Low/minimal

Framework substrand

9.3 reviewing spelling and increasing knowledge of word derivations, patterns and families

National Curriculum ref.

2.3w


Learning objective
To understand the way negative prefixes change the meaning of root words.
Resources required
Student instructions and student resource sheet, exercise books or paper, dictionaries, domino-sized bits of card (optional for extension).
Lesson guidance


  • Starter – students separate words into prefixes and roots. (5 mins)




  • Development – students look up and write down definitions of at least five of the sample root words. (15 mins)

  • Students read through passage, changing prefixes from negative to positive. (10 mins)




  • Plenary – students write their own positive paragraph about a friend in the lesson or a partner, ensuring they use words that can be made negative by adding a prefix (if they need some ideas for this they can look up the prefixes in a dictionary). They swap books and change the paragraphs about themselves into negative paragraphs by adding the prefixes. (20 mins)


Notes for SEN students
Some students that have trouble accessing written language may find it difficult to write the amount the lesson entails. The lesson objectives could also be met if this were done as a speaking and listening activity. Replace development and plenary activities with the following activities.


  1. Teacher gives each student a prefix word from the cloze paragraph (ideally on a piece of card). As the teacher reads the paragraph the first time, students say their word without a prefix, to indicate that they understand what prefixes are and their role.




  1. With prefixes and sample root words in front of them, in pairs, students have a conversation about themselves with and without negative prefixes.


Extension activities / notes for gifted and talented students
Extension students prepare and play a dominoes game (see instructions on student sheet).


Student instructions
1 A negative reaction?
Learning objective
To understand the way negative prefixes change the meaning of words.
Success criteria
By the end of the lesson I will be able to:


  • add prefixes to root words in order to change the meaning of a passage.


Warm up
Many words are made up of different parts, each part giving or changing meaning. For each word below, draw a line between the prefix (something added to the beginning) and the root (main part of the word). The first has been done for you: un│faithful
unfortunate unpleasant impossible illegal
immoral discomfort irresponsible invisible

Your main task!


  1. Pick four words that are new to you from the sample root words table (overleaf). For each one, look up the definition in the dictionary and write it down.




  1. Read through the passage on the student resource sheet, changing the meaning from something positive to something negative by using the prefixes.




  1. Write your own positive paragraph about your partner, ensuring you use words that can be made negative by adding a prefix. Then, swap books and change the paragraph about yourself into a negative paragraph by adding the ‘correct’ prefixes!


Round it off with this
Read a few paragraphs aloud to the rest of the class. One person must raise their hand every time they hear a word with a negative prefix.
Extra challenge

In pairs, write prefixes and roots onto pieces of card. On one side put a root and on the other a prefix (see below). Each prefix should be written three times but roots only once. Then, put the cards together in a pack and distribute the cards equally. Now play a card game (like dominoes) in which the goal is to make complete words with a prefix and root. The first to use all cards wins.





regular

un


Student resource sheet



  1. Sample root words




audible

amiable

orthodox

legible

sensible

regular

possible

attractive

approval

kind

engage

perfect

social

rational

direction

connect



  1. Negative prefixes




il

ir

im

un

dis

mis

a

extra

Read the following story and add the appropriate negative prefix to each word to change the meaning of the story. Use a dictionary if you are unsure which is the correct one to pick!






  1. Now the fun bit!

Now write a positive, flattering paragraph about your partner, using words that can be changed by adding a negative prefix. If you need help choosing words that have negative prefixes, use the sample root word list. Your partner will write a paragraph about you. Once you have both finished, swap papers and change the paragraph written about you to one that gives a negative impression by changing the prefixes. (No one will believe the negative things you write, of course!)



Teacher sheet
2 Assonance


Teacher input required

Medium/some involvement

Framework substrand

9.3 reviewing spelling and increasing knowledge of word derivations, patterns and families

National Curriculum ref.

2.3w spell correctly, increasing their knowledge of regular patterns of spelling, word families, roots of words and derivations, including prefixes, suffixes and inflections


Learning objective
To understand the different sounds individual vowels have in different circumstances and use this knowledge to write a poem.
Resources required
Student instructions, student resource sheets, exercise books, blank A4 paper or mini-whiteboards.
Lesson guidance


  • Starter – students read the first section about long and short vowels on the student resource sheet. (15 mins)




    1. Divide students into five groups and allocate each group a different vowel (A, E, I, O, U).

    2. Ask students to list words that include its short vowel sound on A4 or small whiteboards.

    3. Repeat with long vowel sounds.

    4. Ask groups to try and identify what causes a vowel to be long. (It is the appearance of a second vowel following the first.)




  • Development




    1. Ask students to read sample sentences under ‘Assonance’ on the resource sheet and tick them if they include assonance. Discuss, particularly teasing out that combinations of vowels can change the rules about short and long vowels and that just because words have the same vowels it doesn’t necessarily mean they sound the same. (15 mins)

    2. Students write a short poem about something they are particularly fond of. Whatever its name, they must select the main vowel sound and include at least five instances of assonance in the poem. (20 mins)




  • Plenary – share assonance poem with a partner and identify the assonance in each other’s poems.


Notes for SEN students
Students should be able to do the starter and first development activity with guidance but reading aloud will be essential for some students to help them access the sounds. Writing the poem will be more of a challenge. Putting them in groups to write about the same object might help, as then they can come up with words that create assonance together. The other possibility is that the whole class creates a word bank for the same topic together.
Extension activities / notes for gifted and talented students
Assonance is a simple concept to grasp but keeping it distinct from rhyme or alliteration can be trickier. Able students could be challenged to create an assonance only poem, no rhyme or alliteration allowed.
Student instructions
2 Assonance
Learning objective
To understand the different sounds individual vowels have in different circumstances and use this knowledge to write a poem
Success criteria
By the end of the lesson I will be able to:


  • pick out long and short vowels and use this understanding to write a poem using assonance.


Warm up


  • Read the guidance on long and short vowels on the resource sheet. In groups, you will be assigned one vowel and asked to list words including that vowel’s short sound.

  • Now list words with the vowel’s long sound.

  • Discuss what causes a vowel to make a short sound or a long sound. See if you agree with the ideas that the rest of the class suggest!


Your main task!


  1. Read the sample sentences under ‘Assonance’ on the resource sheet and tick them if they include assonance. While you do this, have a think about assonance and vowel sounds. Do all words with the same vowels in them create assonance? Can you have assonance using more than one type of vowel?




  1. Write a short poem about an object that you are particularly fond of, using the guidance provided on the student resource sheet. Think about the main vowel sound within that name of your object and try to include at least five instances of assonance in your poem.


Round it off with this
Read your poem to a partner but don’t let them see it. They should tick each time they hear your vowel sound repeated. Then, read the poem through together again and discuss whether there were times when you had expected your partner to tick and they didn’t, or whether they missed an example of assonance.
Extra challenge

Now check that your poem contains no rhyme or alliteration, only assonance! It’s not as easy as you’d think!


See if you can spot examples of assonance in poems in poetry anthologies in the classroom. Can you work out why the poet chose to use assonance each time?

Student resource sheet

Every vowel makes two sounds, a short sound and a long sound. The long sound is when the vowel says its own name. Examples of the both types of sound are shown in the words below.




Vowel

Short sound

Long sound

A

Pan

Pane

E

Tell

Television

I

Pin

Pine

O

Rot

Wrote

U

Muck

Mutiny


Assonance
When vowel sounds are repeated throughout a sentence or phrase we call it assonance. Now that we know that vowels can make different sounds in different circumstances, read through the following sentences and tick them if they include assonance. Underline or highlight the vowels that sound the same.





Jim’s pins are short.










Jim finds playing the Wii fun.










Go slow, Jo!










Standing in this peat is just a treat for my feet!










I’ll allow that trout cannot speak aloud.










My tights are higher than the sky.



Writing an assonance poem
Pick something that you are fond of: you are going to write an assonance poem about it!


  • Make a list of all the words you can think of with the appropriate vowel in them. Aim to list at least ten. (For instance, if you pick your dog, you need to find words that also include the short ‘o’ sound, like ‘mop’, ‘stop’, ‘co-operate’ and ‘option’.)




  • Some of these words will suit your chosen subject better than others: circle words that you have written that you might be able to use in the poem.




  • Now write your poem, remembering to include assonance in at least five places. Remember that just because words have the same vowels, doesn’t mean they make the same sounds (and some sounds can be made using different letters, like ‘high’ and ‘sky’)!


Teacher sheet
3 Animal detectives


Teacher input required

Low/minimal

Framework substrand

9.3 reviewing spelling and increasing knowledge of word derivations, patterns and families

National Curriculum ref.

2.3w spell correctly, increasing their knowledge of regular patterns of spelling, word families, roots of words and derivations, including prefixes, suffixes and inflections


Learning objective
To understand the relationship between Latin and Modern English, especially in terms of scientific language.

Resources required
Student instructions, student resource sheet, dictionaries (optional), blank A4 paper.
Lesson guidance


  • Starter – students look at Latin roots and list as many words as they can think of containing those roots and begin to come up with some ideas about their meanings. N.B. Thinking of the latter part of the word might help here.


Answers: Alter = other, Aqua = water, Inter = between, Soci (socius) = companion. (10 mins)


  • Development




    1. Using the chart overleaf, students match animal to scientific name using a list of Latin to English animal terms. (10 mins)

    2. On A4, students create a zoo placard for a mythical creature of their making. The placard must include: the animal’s common name, the animal’s Latin name, a paragraph describing the animal’s habitat and behaviour and a picture of the animal. (20 mins)




  • Plenary – students swap papers and peer assess. The criteria are that the Latin name matches aspects of the animal outlined elsewhere on the placard and that the placard contains the elements listed in the instructions. (10 mins)


Notes for SEN students
Starter This might be better done in groups if students are likely to have a more limited vocabulary, possibly with the aid of a dictionary.
Development Working out Latin animal names is likely to be a challenge as roots, prefixes and suffixes can alter slightly in use as opposed to how they are listed. Writing the four names on the board and separating them into sections (i.e. Sauro | malus | Obesus) will help students understand what exactly they are locating on the list.
Extension activities / notes for gifted and talented students
Zoo placard – students could be encouraged to ignore the frame given, and come up with their own organisation of the placard, perhaps accounting for multiple audiences (i.e. one placard for child visitors and one for zoological experts).
Student instructions
3 Animal detectives
Learning objective
To understand the relationship between Latin and Modern English, especially in terms of scientific language.
Success criteria
By the end of the lesson I will have:


  • shown understanding of the influence of Latin on Modern English.


Warm up
Below are a few Latin roots of words. For each one, list some words you use that include the root. Can you begin to guess what meaning the root might have?


Latin root

Words you know that include this root …

(Try to include at least three more)



Ideas about meaning …

ALTER

e.g. alternate




AQUA

e.g. aqueduct




INTER

e.g. interrupt




SOCI

e.g. society





Your main task!


  1. Using the chart on the resource sheet, match the picture of the animal to the Latin, scientific name. Notice that some single words in the animals’ names are made up of two or more Latin words.




  1. On A4, create a zoo placard (that’s a sign next to an animal’s cage) for a mythical creature from your imagination. The placard must contain: the animal’s English name (e.g. Greedy Horner), the animal’s Latin name (e.g. Adephagos Cornutus), a paragraph describing the animal’s habitat and behaviour (e.g. This unusual creature can be found …) and a picture of the animal.


Round it off with this
Swap papers with a partner or friend and peer assess. Double check that the Latin name matches aspects of the animal outlined elsewhere on the placard: if they say it camouflages itself in green swamps, does it have the Latin for green in its name? Also make sure they have the four things listed in number 2 on their placard.
Extra challenge
Research Carl Linnaeus and Binomial Nomenclature: your science teacher is a good place to start! Find out why Carl decided to use Latin when no one had spoken it as their first language in over a thousand years!

Student resource sheet



Latin

English

Latin

English

Latin

English

acantho-

prickly

garrulous

talkative

obesus

fat

acoce-

pointed

geo

earth, dirt

odon

toothed

acer

sharp

gradus

step, walk

odorus

smelling

acro

top

gravos

heavy

onyx

claw

adephagos

greedy

habros

graceful

ops

eye

adustus

brown

hapalus

soft

oto

ear

aerios, aerius

of the air or sky

hoplites

armoured

pachy

thick

altus

high

hylo

wood

pedalis

footed

amnicus

of a stream

hyphantes

weaver

pedetes

leaper

aqua

water

idris

skilful

phascolo

bag, pouch

arctos

bear

indagator

hunter

pinnatus

feathered

aura

breeze

insignis

remarkable

plicatus

wrinkled

barbatus

bearded

javan

from Java

poly

many

bates

walker

juxta

near

potamos

river

brun

brown

lasios

hairy

pygmaeus

dwarf, little

carnis

meat

leptos

slender

rotundus

round

ceros

horn

leuco

white

ruber

red

chortinos

of the grass

maculosus

spotted

sauros

lizard

cinereus

gray

malus

dark

scolio

crooked

compso-

pretty

marinus

of the sea

silvanus

from the woods

cornutus

horned

mega

huge

sophos

wise

dendron

tree

mela

black

tardus

slow

diurnis

daytime

minor

small

terra

land

dynatos

strong

monti-, montanus

of the mountains

trachys

rough

edestes

eater

necto

swimming

velox, veloci

fast

erio-

woolly

nefrens

toothless

viri-, viridis

green

erythros

red

neo

new

xeno

strange

eurys

broad, wide

nitidus

shining







formosus

beautiful

noctis

night









Which picture is which animal?


  1. Sauromalus Obesus

  2. Phascolarctos cinereus adustus

  3. Acanthion javanicum

  4. Acanthonyx















Teacher sheet
4 Whether the weather


Teacher input required

High/active teaching

Links to other lessons

8.6C

Framework substrand

9.3 reviewing spelling and increasing knowledge of word derivations, patterns and families

National Curriculum ref.

2.3w spell correctly, increasing their knowledge of regular patterns of spelling, word families, roots of words and derivations, including prefixes, suffixes and inflections


Learning objective
To differentiate between homophones and implement the appropriate words in the appropriate context.
Resources required
Student instructions, dictionaries, mini whiteboards (optional), internet for extension activity in development 2 (preferred but not essential).

Lesson guidance


  • Starter – read sentences with misused homophones and write down the correct versions. Most students will miss at least a few! (10 mins)




  • Development




  1. Play the chicken game – see student instructions. (15 mins)

  2. Students compile a personal list of problem homophones. (10 mins)




  • Plenary – students create a mnemonic device for each of their problem homophones.
    (15 mins)


Notes for SEN students
Activity 1 Put students into groups and assign each group a sentence (there are six in all). This will allow them to concentrate on a smaller portion and support each other in spotting the mistakes.
Activity 2 This could also be done in small groups with small whiteboards and pens. Direct students toward the list of common homophones on the resource sheet to give them ideas.
Extension activities / notes for gifted and talented students
Development 1 Challenge students to use both homophones in the sentence, e.g. ‘Alfred had no idea chicken Jim was or what Jim was chickening’. (where/wear)
Development 2 There is a built-in extension activity asking able students to explore harder homophones. (If students have access to the internet, they can find some useful lists at http://www.fun-with-words.com/nym_homonyms.html.)

Student instructions

4 Whether the weather
Learning objective
To differentiate between homophones and implement the appropriate words in the appropriate context
Success criteria
By the end of the lesson I will have:


  • identified the homophones that pose difficulties for me and begun to find methods of dealing with them.


Warm up
Words that sound the same but that are spelt differently are called homophones. The name comes from the Ancient Greek words:
homos (same) + phone (sound)
If the wrong homophone is used a passage might be quite difficult to read, like the one below. However, if you do manage to read it aloud (allowed!), other people will be able to understand it perfectly!

I maid my weigh down the rode. Suddenly eye sore a wight hoarse.

”Ware are ewe off two?” aye asked.

“Too sea the see and watch the son go down.”

“Isle come with yew,” I said.

Sew, I court him and wee road together, wile the wind blue in hour hare.


There are 25 homophones in that short passage. Can you find them and say how the words should have been spelt? Rewrite the passage correctly!


Your main task!


  1. Play the chicken game!




    • The whole class will be split into two teams, A and B.




    • The teacher will select one person from team A to write a sentence on the board and one person from team B to look away while they do.




    • The person writing the sentence from team A on the board needs to replace a possible homophone word with the word ‘chicken’. For example: ‘Alfred had no idea chicken (where/wear) Dilip was’.




    • The person that has been looking away (from team B) then needs to come up to the board and replace ‘chicken’ with the correct homophone.




    • Each correct homophone gains the team one point.




    • It is then Team B’s turn to make up the sentence and team A’s turn to correct it.


  1. Have a look at this collection of common homophones. Note that some have more than one alternative!




allowed

aloud

so

sew




ate

eight

through

threw




bear

bare

wait

weight




check

cheque

wear

where




hair

hare

weather

whether




here

hear

which

witch




hour

our

who’s

whose




it’s

its

whole

hole




made

maid

write

right




new

knew

you

ewe




piece

peace

you’re

your




road

rode

by

bye

buy

sea

see

their

they're

there

site

sight

two

too

to




  1. Circle or highlight five pairs/groups that you think you might get confused. (You could check through your exercise books to see if you have got these confused in your writing.)




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