The deal to solve the eurozone's debt crisis is to be put to a referendum in Greece. Demonstrators outside St Paul's Cathedral are being told they have two days to leave or face legal action



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Radio 4 TODAY Nov 2011

Tuesday 1st November



The deal to solve the eurozone's debt crisis is to be put to a referendum in Greece. Demonstrators outside St Paul's Cathedral are being told they have two days to leave or face legal action. And also in today's programme, why September babies do better than those born in August.

0615
Business news with Simon Jack on the growth of the UK economy over the last three months. And the eurozone debt crisis has claimed its first victim - US broking company MF Global filed for bankruptcy after a large exposure to European debt.

0650
The head of GCHQ - Britain's communications intelligence agency - has warned of a growing threat from intellectual property theft and espionage in cyberspace. The BBC's security correspondent Gordon Corera reports on these increasing attacks, which are believed to originate mostly from China.

0709
Greece's prime minister George Papandreou has called for a referendum on the deal to write off part of the country's debt. Vicky Pryce, former head of the government's economic service who now works for FTI Consulting gives her reaction.

0713
Statistics examined by BBC News show that extra offences criminals ask "to be taken into consideration" when pleading guilty are routinely added to crime figures in England and Wales, improving detection rates. John Cooper QC, a criminal barrister and visiting professor of law at Cardiff University, explains the figures.

0716
Business news with Simon Jack.

0719
Latest figures show that that there are nearly a million young people without a job, more than at any time for nearly 20 years. In first of her reports on youth unemployment, Zubeida Malik speaks to an 18-year-old in Coventry who was made redundant three weeks ago.

0725
Sport news with Garry Richardson.

0730
One hundred years after the term schizophrenia was first coined by a Swiss psychiatrist, we still do not know what causes the devastating condition and treatments available can cause as many problems as they solve. Science correspondent Tom Feilden reports on what has been dubbed "the forgotten illness".

0735
The government is increasingly worried about cybercrime, with the number of attacks on the rise and companies spending vast amounts trying to protect themselves. Ross Anderson, professor of security engineering at Cambridge University and Misha Glenny whose latest book, Dark Market, looks at cybercrime, discuss the growing threat.

0740
A review of the papers.

0744
In the last 30 years, the rate of bird extinction has been accelerating, with 21 species disappearing and 190 currently classified as critically endangered. Nicola Stanbridge met the cartoonist Ralph Steadman who is one of a selection of artists, musicians and poets who have been enrolled to highlight the problem in the Ghosts of Gone Birds exhibition.

0747
Thought for The Day with Reverend Joel Edwards - International Director of Micah Challenge.

0751
Anti-capitalist protesters are to be told to remove their tents from outside St Paul's Cathedral or face legal action. Today presenter James Naughtie visited the cathedral at Evensong and heard from two vicars, the Rev Alan Green and the Rev Paul Turp, about where they think the Church of England should stand.

0810
What will the Greek prime minister's plans for a referendum mean for the euro bailout deal agreed last week? Greek MEP Anni Podimata and the Athens Chamber of Commerce's Constantine Michalos debate the country's referendum on the euro debt deal

0821
Detailed research by the Institute for Fiscal Studies suggests that there is a big difference between the paths followed by children born in August and September, such as the likelihood to go to a top university or score lower in the National Achievement Tests. Claire Crawford, lead author of the research and Matthew Syed, whose book, Bounce, in part explores age bias in sport, discuss these findings.

0826
Sport news with Garry Richardson.

0833
The computer chip designer ARM is a global leader in its field. Its products are found in almost all mobile phones and handheld computers. Business editor Robert Peston has visited the company, where he spoke to its boss, Warren East. And Sir Richard Lambert, the former director of the CBI, analyses the strengths and weaknesses of UK technology companies.

0838
The results of the Arab Spring appear to be making Israel feel more isolated in the region. Middle East correspondent Kevin Connolly examines just how much further out in the cold Israel might find itself.

0844
One hundred years since the term schizophrenia was first coined the charity Rethink Mental Illness, that specialises in the condition, believes it has become a forgotten illness. Professor Sir Robin Murray examines our understanding of the condition.

0848
Business news with Simon Jack.

0851
Behind the question of tactics in dealing with the anti-corporatist encampment, and the evident discomfort in St Paul's Cathedral about how they should be managed, what are the deeper questions - and will they pass away, or remain? Matthew Hancock, MP for West Suffolk and Ian Birrell former speech writer for David Cameron and contributing editor to the Daily Mail, discuss the issues raised by the protests.

Wednesday 2nd November



The Greek cabinet has backed its prime minister over his decision to put the eurozone's rescue deal to a referendum. The Archbishop of Canterbury has called for a tax on financial transactions. And also on today's programme, playing Winston Churchill on stage or screen.

0615
Business news with Simon Jack on the sharp fall of the financial markets and the euro after news of the potential unravelling of the EU bailout package agreed only last week.

0650
A new charity is asking all those over 60 who do not need their winter fuel allowance to donate it to disadvantaged young people. Howard Zetter, founder of Fuel Our Youth, explains the charity's aim.

0709
Talks are being held to try and prevent what could be the biggest strike in decades on 30 November. Brian Strutton, national secretary of the GMB union and one of the TUC's main pension negotiators, outlines what could halt the proposed industrial action.

0713
St Paul's Cathedral in London and the City of London have both dropped their planned legal action to evict protesters camped outside the cathedral. Stuart Fraser, chairman of the policy and resources committee of the City's corporation, explains the decision.

0716
Business news with Simon Jack.

0720
Latest figures show that that there are nearly a million young people without a job, more than at any time for nearly 20 years, with a quarter living in London. In the second of her reports on youth unemployment, Zubeida Malik meets Lauren, a 19-year-old mother from Streatham, South London.

0725
Sport news with Garry Richardson.

0730
Patience in the financial markets expired yesterday as news of a Greek referendum on the eurozone bailout package led to big falls in stock markets. Elena Panaritis, an MP from the Greek Pasok party, explains if Greece will accept the deal.

0738
A review of the papers.

0740
Lewis Carroll's novels about Alice and her adventures are among the most widely translated and quoted books in the world and have inspired writers and musicians from James Joyce to John Lennon. Arts correspondent Rebecca Jones has been to a new exhibition at Tate Liverpool which aims to show for the first time the influence the Alice books have also had on the visual arts.

0747
Thought for The Day with Anne Atkins - novelist and columnist.

0750
After days of criticism from the public and the press, St Paul's Cathedral has now made it clear it will not be trying to evict anti-capitalist protesters from its grounds, while acknowledging the protestors demands that "something must be done". The Bishop of London, Dr Richard Chartres, outline his view of the protest and the church's attitude to finance.

0810
What will happen if the Greek public says no to the eurozone rescue deal in a referendum? Richard Corbett, member of the cabinet of the European Council president, explains his concerns.

0816
Joanna Yeates' landlord Christopher Jefferies received damages payments from eight newspapers who branded him a "freak" and "a peeping tom" after being arrested by police investigating her murder. Mr Jefferies, who was released without charge, describes how his life changed after the police knocked on his door.

0824
There have been more than 100 stage and screen portrayals of Winston Churchill. So how do actors approach that iconic role when it has been done so many times before? Nicola Stanbridge met actor Warren Clarke, who is playing the former prime minister in the West End play Three Days in May.

0826
Sport news with Garry Richardson.

0837
With US presidential elections one year away, most opinion polls show a majority of Americans are unhappy with Barack Obama's performance and do not think he deserves to be re-elected, although a Republican contender is yet to be decided. North America editor Mark Mardell reports from the key swing state of Ohio on how the electoral race is shaping up.

0844
Business news with Simon Jack.

0847
Health and safety figures are expected to show that accidents on farms account for around a fifth of Britain's workplace deaths - even though farmers make up less than 2% of the working population. Dave Howard investigates what the agricultural industry is doing to improve its health and safety record.

0850
One of the notable features of European policy-making is that for anything to get done, it is the French and Germans who make it happen. Gideon Rachman, the FT's chief foreign affairs correspondent, gives his view on the Merkozy - Sarkozy/Merkel - double act.

0855
It is 75 years ago that the BBC first broadcast a continuous high definition television service - the TV we recognise today. John Trenouth, a television historian, and Adrian Mars, a technology journalist and futurologist, discuss the long-term significance of television.

Thursday 3rd November



France and Germany say Greece will have to decide whether it wants to stay in the eurozone when it votes on the bailout deal. And also on today's programme, Leslie Caron, the French ballet dancer chosen by Gene Kelly to make her screen debut in the film An American in Paris, talks about her long-standing Hollywood career.

0615
Business news with Simon Jack, on the announcement at the G20 that Greece will have to decide whether it wants to stay in the eurozone when it votes on the bailout deal.

0650
The earliest evidence of modern humans in Europe, dated to 41,000 years ago, has been found in Torquay. One of the authors of the findings published in Nature, Professor Chris Stringer, explains how new techniques have allowed the remains to be dated more accurately.

0653
Latest figures show that that there are nearly a million people aged 16 to 24 are without a job, more than at any time for nearly 20 years. In the third of her reports Zubeida Malik meets Deanna, a 16-year-old school leaver in Rugby, dubbed a Neet - a young person not in education, employment or training.

0709
Twenty of the world's most powerful leaders have been arriving in Cannes for the G20 summit, where the eurozone crisis and Greece will dominate the agenda. BGC Partners' David Buik analyses the implications if an agreement is not reached.

0714
The Corporation of London has been in touch with protesters outside St Paul's, saying it wants to avoid legal action but limit the size and duration of the camp protest. Naomi Colvin, member of the protesters' policy committee, outlines how they might respond to the offer.

0718
Business news with Simon Jack.

0721
Subsidised regeneration of deprived areas is being cut back and MPs have raised concerns that a decent alternative strategy has been put in place. Chris Brown, chief executive of the private urban regeneration property development fund, igloo, shares his views on how the private sector should move in as the government moves out.

0723
David Norgrove, who has been given the job of reviewing the way family law works in England and Wales, wants to reduce delays in the courts to a legal limit of six months by asking judges to no longer scrutinise detailed plans for children in care, but instead give local authorities more responsibility. Sanchia Berg reports on the concerns these plans are causing within the courts.

0725
Sport news with Garry Richardson.

0734
Research published in the journal BMJ Open claims that 4,000 deaths a year could be prevented if the people of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland eat the same diet as the English. Peter Scarborough, from the department of public health at Oxford University, and Mike Lean, professor of human nutrition at Glasgow University, discuss the findings.

0738
A review of the papers.

0742
A new film - Anyone Can Play Guitar - aims to put Oxford back on the music scene, highlighting the global success of both Radiohead and Supergrass, but also celebrating the influence of many lesser-known bands. Entertainment reporter Colin Paterson has seen the film and discusses it with director Jon Spira and Ed O'Brien from the band Radiohead.

0747
Thought for The Day with the writer Rhidian Brook.

0750
A survey by Barnardo's has found that nearly half of people in the UK think children are angry, violent and abusive, with a quarter thinking they are beyond help by the age of 10. Mark Hutchings went to meet some teenagers from Glyn Derw in a deprived part of Cardiff. Anne Marie Carrie of Barnardo's and Nirpal Bhogal, writer and director of film Sket about girl gangs in London, debate the problem.

0810
The French and Germans have told Greece that if they vote no in the referendum they will not get any bailout money and should leave the euro. The BBC's Mark Lowen takes the temperature in Athens and economics editor Stephanie Flanders is at the G20 summit in Cannes.  And Harvard economics professor Ken Rogoff analyses what could happen to the eurozone if the referendum goes ahead.

0820
Sixty years ago, the classic Hollywood musical An American in Paris was released, marking the screen debut of a young French ballet dancer called Leslie Caron. Now aged 80 and still working, she has been talking to arts correspondent Rebecca Jones about her long Hollywood career and her work with legends Fred Astaire and Cary Grant.

0826
Sport news with Garry Richardson.

0830
The man given the job of reviewing the way family law works in England and Wales says delays in the courts are shocking, recommending a legal limit for family cases of six months, unless there are exceptional circumstances. David Norgrove explains why it is vital to shorten the time it takes to adopt a child.

0838
A year before the US presidential elections, opinion polls suggest it is unclear if President Obama - who is undoubtedly not helped by the poor state of the US economy - will be re-elected. However, North America editor Mark Mardell asks if his leadership style is also to blame.

0844
Business news with Simon Jack.

0848
Pakistan's former cricket captain Salman Butt, along with his teammates Mohammed Asif and Mohammed Amir are expected to be sentenced today after being found guilty of conspiracy to cheat and conspiracy to accept corrupt payments. Aleem Maqbool is outside Mr Butt's house and Ed Smith, former England cricketer and writer for The Times, explains why the outcome of the trial is so important for the sport.

0853
Greece, as one MP told this programme yesterday, is in "a mess". Raoul Ruparel, from the sceptical think tank Open Europe, and Petros Fassoulas from the pro-European think tank the European Movement, debate where Greece stands on democracy and the struggle to maintain the dream of the single currency.

Friday 4th November



Barclays' chief executive Bob Diamond says taxpayers money should never again be spent bailing out a bank. And another day of political turmoil is expected in Greece, where the prime minister appears to have dropped plans for a referendum on the latest European bailout.

0615
Business news with Simon Jack on Barclays boss Bob Diamond's defence of the banking industry as guest speaker at the BBC Today Programme Business Lecture.

0650
Thames Water is to publish its latest plans for building what it calls a supersewer - a 20-mile-long concrete tunnel that would cost more than £4bn and take seven years to build. Richard Aylard, director of sustainability for Thames Water, explains why the project is needed.

0653
If you are a young person who is not in employment, education or training you are known as a "neet" and you are one of almost a million. Dr Neil Lee talks about the report he wrote for the Work Foundation on the best and worst places to be a neet.

0709
As Greece's prime minister comes under increasing pressure to resign with a vote of confidence due tonight. Former Greek finance minister Stefanos Manos and British economist Roger Bootle debate the possible outcomes for Greece and its leader.

0716
Business news with Simon Jack.

0722
At 10am this morning, six men who spent the last year-and-a-half cooped up together in Moscow in conditions designed to simulate a mission to Mars will finally emerge. Anu Ojha, director of the National Space Academy in Leicester, outlines the effect the "mission" has had on the volunteers, both physically and psychologically.

0725
Sport news with Rob Bonnet.

0732
After a chaotic day in the Greek parliament, it appears there will not be a referendum on the eurozone bailout package, but that Greek prime minister George Papandreou position is in jeopardy. European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso tells Today presenter John Humphrys that he expects a government of national unity to be formed, and that its economic problems in the country "will be solved".

0740
A review of the papers.

0742
Next year, the international community will vote on whether to abolish the leap second - the extra pip you occasionally hear at New Year - which, if it goes through, would mean that for the first time in our history our time-scale may no longer be tied to the rotation of our planet. Science reporter Rebecca Morelle has been finding out more.

0747
Thought for The Day with Lord Singh - Director of the Network of Sikh organisations.

0750
The G20 summit in Cannes has been overshadowed by turmoil within Greece as it seeks to wrestle with its continuing debt problem. Speaking from the summit, Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne outlines his hopes for a resolution of the Greek crisis and for the success of the summit.

0810
What can banks do to restore public faith in what they do? Chief executive Barclays Bob Diamond, who gave the inaugural Today Business Lecture, gives a rare interview to John Humphrys.

0826
Sport news with Rob Bonnet.

0836
The 20 most powerful leaders in the world spent much of the first day of their meeting in Cannes trying to work out what was going on in Athens. Stephanie Flanders previews what to expect from day two of the G20. and political editor Nick Robinson assesses what EU fiscal union would mean for the UK.

0843
Business news with Simon Jack.

0846
MPs have criticised the UK Border Agency for giving up on trying to remove 124,000 people from Britain and political editor and effectively "dumping" their immigration cases in an archive. The committee's chairman Keith Vaz explains his concerns.

0850
One hundred years since it was founded, Woman's Weekly now sells 340,000 copies a week, compared to two million back in the 1950s. Its editor Diane Kenwood and Dr Clare Rose, a social historian and researcher for the Women's Library, discuss what has made the magazine so iconic.

0855
Has Bob Diamond restored trust in the banks? Merryn Somerset Webb, editor-in-chief of Moneyweek and Paul Lewis, BBC's Money Box presenter, give their views on the Barclays boss' speech at the Today Programme Business Lecture.

Saturday 5th November



The Greek prime minister, George Papandreou, has won a vote of confidence in Athens - but the future of his government remains uncertain. And later on the programme, Johnny Depp on the price of fame and his new film - Rum Diary.

0720
The US has made it clear that it will not be participating financially in the eurozone bailout, and they bristled at suggestions their power in the world has been diminished because of that. However, North America editor Mark Mardell has been investigating whether, a year from the presidential election, Barack Obama's foreign policy puts into question America's ability to lead.

0725
The General Assembly of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics has approved the names of three new elements to be added to the Periodic Table. Professor Andrea Sella, from the department of chemistry at UCL, describes the new elements.

0728
Sport news with Rob Bonnet.

0735
Although a peace deal was brokered by the Arab League in Syria to stop the daily attacks on protesters by the forces of President Assad, yesterday at least 15 protesters were killed. Middle East correspondent John Leyne and Rosemary Hollis, Professor of Middle East policy studies at City University, analyses the effect of Syria's potential suspension from the Arab League.

0740
A review of the papers.

0744
Three Pakistan cricketers involved in spot-betting scandal were jailed on Thursday. Lord McLaurin, former England and Wales Cricket Board chairman, discusses the damage this has done to the sport and whether the verdict will change anything.

0747
Thought for The Day with the Reverend Dr Giles Fraser of the Church of England.


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