The Dutch families of Losee, Koeck, Denton & Brush in New York, mid 1600's



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in New York City in the 1600s & 1700s

in Colonial America Through Revolutionary War

The Dutch families of Losee, Koeck, Denton & Brush in New York, mid 1600's

This is a record of my Lamoureux Family affiliates from Holland through the pre-revolution New Amsterdam / New York Colony & into Canada from the mid 1600s to 1800s.

The Losee family was in New Amsterdam [New York] mid 1600's, 50 years before the Lamoreaux family.

Abigail Ann Losee married John McCord Lamoreaux in 1805 in Loyalist Canada.
See Also: Lamoreaux Family Time Lines, from France to Engl. & New York City, & The Hudson Valley & beyond – starting with ANDRE’ & SUZANNE LATOUR LAMOREAUX IN NEW YORK – 1700 - Following Andre & Suzanne’s children and some grand children in New York City & New Rochelle & on the Hudson River.

See also: MASSE' FAMILY COMES TO NEW YORK – Including Mercereau - Daniel Lamoreaux married Jeanne Masse’

http://genconnect.rootsweb.com/gc/surnames/l/o/LOSEE/biographies

aprilsancestry.com
LOSEE

“The name has been spelt: Losey, Loosie, Losie, Loyse, Lowsye, Loszie, and Losee, the later being the most commonly used. The progenitor of the Losee family in America was Cornelius who emigrated from Utrecht, Holland, to Brunswick, Long Island, in 1651. The record of this family has been very difficult to set and very little information has been very difficult to get and very little information has been found. Many of the birth dates of the children have been estimated from the marriage dates as found in the records. In the Holland Society Year Book for 1897, page 133, it says, ‘A number of volumes of records of the Dutch Church of Brooklyn, N.Y. were lost, having been carried away by the village clerk together with the village records at the close of the Revolution.’ The records of the people of Brunswick were kept at Brooklyn at that time. The marriage records are more perfect. Much information has been received through correspondence and the best judgment has been exercised in placing some of the children and where there has been any doubt it is indicated.” P. 54

Annie A Van Cott The Female Ancestors of Losee Van Cott in America & Europe
KOECK

The name was variously spelt as Kouk, Koek, Koeck, Kok and sometimes also with a “C” which makes it very hard to trace the family as there were so many English Cocks in Long Island also. Only the first generation has been found. A Lourens Corneliszen Koeck son of Cornelis Koeck, emigrates in 1661 from Dennemarken, Denmark to Long Island where he lived in Flatbush and also Bushwick. He married 5 Mar 1676, Margrietje Barents (---note- - - - b abt 1642) who was most likely a daughter of Barent Arentszen and Marrietje Cornelis as they were witness to the baptism of Margrietje’s first child, Cornelis, who would be named after his paternal grandfather and also his maternal grandmother. [part is crossed out here.] Lourens Koeck was on the assessment rolls of Flatbush of 1676, the year he married, and also of 1683. He took the oath of allegiance in Brunswick in Sept. 1687, being 26 years in the country. ‘Feb. 2, 1677-8 or Dec. 29, 1687, Laurens Cornelise, a farmer of N. Arnheim in Boswyck, bought of Stoffel Janse, carpenter, 2 lots of woodland nos. 32 & 33 in the new lots of Flatbush for 300 gl., bought by said Stoffel of Minne Johannes.’ Both he and his wife had their names on a mortage of land in Bushwick 24 Jan. 1692. [children are listed here] p 75

Annie A Van Cott The Female Ancestors of Losee Van Cott in America & Europe
DENTON

The Rev. Richard Denton of Catherine Hall, Yorkshire, England was born in 1586. He was a graduate of Cambridge University in 1623 and became the minister (for 4 years) of Halifax, (Parrish, Colby Chapel.) Yorkshire. (He was living in Jurton Parish of Bolton in 1627) In 1630 he emigrated to America in the “Arbella" (Religious persecution drove him to America.) with Gov. Winthrop, landing at Boston, Mass. Shortly after this he led a party of people to Witherfield, Conn. as their minister. In 1640-1 he led another party to Stamford, Conn. where he founded the Congregational Church. From the his­tory of Stamford we learn that in 1644 a colony composed of Richard Denton, father and sons. …. They named the town Hempstead after Hummel Hempstead, a town near London, England, where some of the people came from. Denton became the first min­ister of Hempstead and is said to have been the founder of Presbyterianism in America. He had been ordained in the Church of England but was won over to the Puritan side.”



Annie A Van Cott, The Female Ancestors /Losee Van Cott in America/ Europe p 110

Family SURNAMES spelling is a constant problem as they change from source to source. Many variants forms are therefore found in the literature. Early town and church clerks were not well educated.”

Dutch wives did not change their [surnames?] when they married to their husband's. This leads to family trace problems. Numerous 2nd and 3rd marriages were also common as death came early.”

It was only after the English established their rule in 1674 that the Dutch inhabitants had to take a Family Surname.”



Bergen, William Swayer. Jacob Milton Bergen, Sr Family Of Long Island, New York

"The founding of New Amsterdam, usually supposed to be by the Dutch and Baltic people was largely by Huguenots under Dutch auspices. ...Manhattan Island had become a trading post for Amsterdam firms and so when the first shipload of Huguenot emigrants came they did not come as strangers for French families had been there for years, ..."



G. Elmore Reaman, The Trail of the Huguenots in Europe, the United States, South Africa and Canada,

[Many of the early Huguenots, Walloons, left France and went to Holland.]
"... coming to the Colonies and settling there is not as simple a matter as we might imagine it today. Money, and a lot of it, was needed for those who wanted to come as free agents rather than indentured servants. One needed not only to pay for the ocean fare on the pier, but also the money for the land, which was payable in advance, in England. ... Artisans needed rent money and raw material for their trade. The language also constituted a certain barrier for the new immigrant. Unless the Huguenot could make himself understood in English, there was little opportunity for him in trade ...

" A Brief History of the Huguenots, Rev Herbert L Stein-Schneideer, Washington, DC, 1973.
Long Island

Through hundreds of such agreements the Dutch pieced to­gether six towns by 1660: Flatlands, t'Vlache Bos (Flatbush, the wooded plain), Boswijk (Bushwick, the town of woods), Grave­send (for either the town in England or 's Gravensande, Dutch for the count's beach), and Nieuw Utrecht and Breukelen (both named for towns back in Holland). Over the next two hundred years the villages would grow and join together to become the City of Brooklyn.

Oddly enough, though all but one of these villages were located on the water, the settlers ignored the ocean, the bay, and the river. They were by habit farmers, not fishermen or sailors, and except for a handful of men in Breukelen who worked the ferry and a few Gowanus oystermen and beachcombers who picked over the shore in search of quahog and periwinkle shells that could be turned into negotiable wampum, the early Brooklynites turned their backs to the sea.

In his history of New York City the young Teddy Roosevelt criticized these farmers for lacking the true pioneer spirit, a spirit he seemed to associate with chopping down trees. "The Dutch settlers," he wrote, "took slowly and with reluctance to that all-important tool and weapon of the American pioneer, the axe, and chopped down very little timber indeed.” Actually, at rocky, wooded Flatbush, the only inland settlement, the Dutch did clear the land (although they didn't fence in their cattle, which caused some squabbles with the Indians) and later even took advantage of the breezy highlands to build a few windmills.

The Dutch West India Company controlled all aspects of the settlers' lives, and it controlled them for a single purpose: to make money for the stockholders. In other bays and inlets along the Atlantic Coast other colonies were established for religious or social reasons or simply for the personal profit of the settlers themselves. …The company needed settlers in New Nether­lands, and if it couldn't get proper Calvinists, it would take what it could get.

“…Dominie Megapolensis, the pastor who founded the Dutch Reformed churches in Flatlands and Flatbush, wrote to a friend back home that the dangerous snakes had rattles on their tails to warn the unwary, that there were plenty of furs available to keep off the cold winds, and that if at one moment ‘the clouds will appear as if they would spew cats,’ an hour later there would not be a cloud in the sky. These were hardly major inducements to a prospective Dutch settler who could choose among the rich forests of northern Brazil, the warm sands of Curacao, and the lucrative slave markets of Angola.

It is hardly a surprise that most of Brooklyn's six villages grew slowly. From the beginning Breukelen - directly across the East River from New Amsterdam - had commercial potential, and Flatbush was always a busy country market town. The rest re­mained isolated settlements of a few farmhouses - usually long, low buildings with heavy overhanging roofs - protected by a wooden stockade. The farmlands were outside of town, and the best of them were long strips that took advantage of the changing topography, from the sweet sea grass along the water to the flat­lands for pasture to the inland forests with their valuable wood­lots.

The stockades were for protection against the Indians. Years later, in the 1890s, when a group of prosperous Park Slope gen­tlemen formed the Montauk Club and built a handsome clubhouse vaguely suggested by the Ca' d'Oro in Venice, they decorated the exterior not with Italianate cherubs but with thoroughly Ameri­can eagles and scenes of local Indian life. One frieze runs around three sides of the building, and according to the novelist L. J. Davis, it depicts - depending on which end of the building you begin to view it from - either a war ending with a peace treaty or a peace treaty followed by a war. That ambiguity nicely sums up the Indian situation in the mid-seventeenth century in Brooklyn. There was no lack of treaties and bills of sale. What they meant, however, was debatable.

The Dutch claimed that since the agreements were with them, the Canarsees no longer had to pay tribute to the Mohawks, and under the orders of Governor Willem Kieft the Dutch began to take the valuable gifts for, themselves. In 1643 Kieft seized two wagonloads of corn, killing several Indians in the process. The result, interrupted by a peace treaty or two, was Kieft's War. Marauding Mohawks destroyed farmhouses along Newtown Creek. The Bennett place on the Gowanus, one of the first houses in Breukelen, was burned. Gravesend was attacked, and the set­tlers had to flee to Flatlands. The war spread as far as West­chester, where the religious leader Anne Hutchinson and her family were killed. It all ended with a company of fifty men from New Amsterdam massacring nearly five hundred Indians at Horse Neck, near Greenwich, Connecticut.

But that was pretty much the last time that anyone in Brooklyn was bothered by, or even much noticed, the Indians. A local law passed in 1655 said that no Indian "could pow wow or perform worship to the devil" within the limits of any town in the colony, but it wasn't needed in Brooklyn. The Indians were on their way to becoming harmless town characters. As one nineteenth-century clergyman piously phrased it, noting the passing of what he be­lieved to be the last of the Canarsees: "The white race grew stronger, and the Indian weaker until about 1830 when Jim de Wilt, or 'Jim the wildman,' died in his wretched hut. . . the mis­erable remnant of the once proud possessors of these fertile lands."

Old Indian trails were used by the settlers, and in time they were widened and paved to become Kings Highway and Flatbush Avenue. The Mohawks returned to the Gowanus in the 1920s, when the Manhattan skyscraper boom began, and builders found that the Indians' unusual sense of balance made them excellent workers on steel riggings hundreds of feet above the ground. Perhaps as many as a thousand settled in apartment houses and tenements not far from where the Bennett farm had burned. A few blocks away the Wigwam Bar opened its doors close to the spot where the worthy burghers of Breukelen had built their tiny Dutch Reformed church in the shape of an octagon so that it could also be used as a fort in case of Indian raids.

The Dutch Reformed churches were the center of life in all but one of the Brooklyn towns. Gravesend was the exception. In New Netherlands, Gravesend was always the exception. The town had no church and wouldn't have one until 1763. Its citizens were English-speaking, and its leader was a woman, the lady Deborah Moody, nee Dunch, daughter of one of Queen Elizabeth's members of Parliament, granddaughter of the Bishop of Durham, and widow of a baronet.”

In August of 1776 Brooklyn underwent the biggest population explosion in its history. In less than a week nearly thirty thousand outsiders-both British and American-swept across the county. The Revolution had begun, and the British, under General William Howe, were about to oust the rebels from New York City. Nearly twelve thousand Americans mostly from New England and Maryland-were drawn up ort Brooklyn Heights and on a: line of hills that ran from Newtown Creek through Bedford and Flatbush to the Narrows. The British fleet anchored off Coney Island and Gravesend and on August 25 landed about fifteen thousand men, …One of the American plans for Manhattan involved burning the place down and leaving it, worthless, to the enemy. This was never done, but a modified version of the plan was enacted in Kings County, where the Dutch population had not demonstrated much enthusiasm for George Washington or the Continental Congress. The rebels burned Flatbush farms, and farmers' crops in New Utrecht, Flatlands, and other outlying communities were destroyed so that they would not fall into British hands.

After midnight, on the morning of August 27, the British troops began to move north toward the East River, and an eyewitness later remembered as an old woman that "before noon the Red Coats were so thick in Flatlands you could walk on their heads." But by noon the battle was already over. The American com­manders, General Israel Putnam and his subordinate, John Sulli­van, were unfamiliar with Brooklyn and had failed to fortify one of the four passes that cut through the hills that separated Grave­send from the East River.

“… The road was filled with troops for six hours, he remembered, and "to the eye [they] gleamed like sheets of fire." The main body of the American army escaped capture because a storm kept the British fleet out of the East River, and two regiments of Massachusetts fishermen-from Marblehead, Lynn, Salem, and Danvers-managed to row nine thousand men, along with horses, cannon, and ammunition, across the river to Manhattan in a single night. There Washington regrouped his army and fled to safety in White Plains.

The war moved on to the American mainland, but a British army of occupation remained, and after a hundred years of being indifferent to crown rule many Brooklynites suddenly discovered that they were ardent royalists. The Flatlands racetrack was transformed into Ascot Heath. The Livingston family brewery be­came the King's Brewery, and the Ferry Tavern was renamed King's Head.”



McCullough, David W. Brooklyn …and How it Got that Way. Pp7-8
“Stoutenburgh in his ‘Documentary History of Oyster Bay’, says, ‘These early Dutch people in America were a home loving people and lived very much to themselves and intermarried much. They were very much devoted to their children and kept them under the family roof; building additions to their homes when they married. They were good and loyal citizens and love their God and their country.’

If the husband or wife died it was customary for the survivor to marry again, often within a month or two and the children from both marriages were gathered into one house. Sometimes a widower with a number of children would marry a widow having as many or more, and to these new ones would soon be added. There were of course, a great many deaths among the children but after the period of early youth, the chances for life were good and many reached extreme old age. Many men were killed in battle or accident.”

In contracting marriages it was the fashion for two or more children of one family to select partners from children of some other family. Sometimes the parents took part in the promotion of these multiple family alliances.

If a child died the parents had habit of bestowing its name on the arrival of the same gender and this was often repeated several times in case of a succession of early deaths. If either husband or wife died it was considered polite to name the first child of the new marriage after the departed spouse. The first son was almost always named for his paternal grandfather, and the second after his maternal grandfather and after these the uncles were honored. The girls maternal grandmother was first honored then the paternal grandmother and so on. This makes it comparatively easy for the genealogist to locate family names. Certain names were thus maintained through many generations.

In the matter of spelling names each man spelled according to his fancy. Down to about the time of the Revolutionary War there seems to have been no fixed rule for spelling. …”

Van Cott, Annie A., The Female Ancestors of Losee Van Cott in America and Europe. pg. i
John Adams said, Opposing friends in the war, "is the sharpest thorn on which I ever set my foot" p 666

LOSEE & DENTON & KOECK FAMILIES COME TO NEW YORK

Date Place Event & Source


  1. Catherine Hall, Yorkshire England “The Rev. Richard Denton of Catherine Hall, Yorkshire, England was born in 1586.”

He had a son Richard who married Ruth Tileston

Who had a daughter named Geertje who married Cornelius Losee.

Annie A Van Cott, The Female Ancestors /Losee Van Cott in Am/ Europe p 110
??? Bushwick, L.I. “…early settlers of Bushwick, L.I., now a part of Brooklyn, N.Y. The families here

considered are those of Woertman, Nagel, and Losee,…”

Mr Provost gives an interesting account of how Jan Corneliszen, progenitor of the fourth family included in this volume, acquired the surname Losee. His sons Cornelis, Pieter, and Jacob, about 1680, adopted the name of Loyse which, with its variant forms, ultimately became Losee.”



AN6 N vol. XCV #3 July 1964 (from Aunt Vida) page 165?

Provost, ?? . Secretary of the Province of N.Y. Previous to ????

Cornelius who emigrated from Utrecht, Holland, to Brunswick, Long Island, in 1651.” p 54

Annie A Van Cott, The Female Ancestors of Losee Van Cott in America & Europe

1. Cornelius Losee arrived in New Amsterdam in 1651 and settled at Bushwick, Long Island, N.Y. (Doct. Hist. S. of N.Y. Vol. 2. p. 215) He is listed as one of ye souldjers for ye expedition to Albany as 25 shillings per month and provisions 1689. marr. Grietje Tilburgh.

Issue: 2 Petter mar. Sarah Coeff 3. Jacobus mar. Elizabeth

4. Jan mar. Marytje Koek 5. Jannetje Mar. Adriaen LaDorest

6. Dorthea Mar, Cornelius Vanderwater

(3) Jacobus Lowysse of Jamaica L.I. on assas. Roll Brooklyn 1708

mar. Elizabeth and had (7) Abraham

Mackensie, Grenville C, "Families of Old Phillipsburg, NY"

1623 Cambridge, England “The Rev. Richard Denton of Catherine Hall, Yorkshire, England…

was a graduate of Cambridge University in 1623”



Annie A Van Cott, The Female Ancestors /Losee Van Cott in Am/ Europe p 110

1626 abt of Bushwick, L.I., N.Y. Cornelius Losee is born to ??

Later married Grietje Tilburgh

Probably from Utrecht, Holland to Bushwick, Long Island, N.Y. 1651

Cornelius (the father on this sheet) took the oath of allegiance in Bushwick in 1687 as having been in the country 36 years (1687-36=1651). He was one of the soldiers sent to Albany in 1689 and was on the Brunswick Census list in 1698 as having a wife and six children”

Family Group Sheet for Cornelius Losee & Grietje Tilburgh s. Mrs Claude Flander

1627 Cambridge, England “The Rev. Richard Denton of Catherine Hall, Yorkshire, England… became the minister

(for 4 years) of Halifax, (Parrish, Colby Chapel.) Yorkshire. (He was living in ?Jurton Parish of Bolton in 1627)

Annie A Van Cott, The Female Ancestors /Losee Van Cott in Am/ Europe p 110

1628 abt of Bushwick, Long Island, N. Y. Grietje Tilburgh is born

Family Group Sheet for Cornelius Losee & Grietje Tilburgh s. Mrs Claude Flander

1630 England to America “The Rev. Richard Denton[Sr] of Catherine Hall, Yorkshire, England

In 1630 he emigrated to America in the “Arbella" (Religious persecution drove him to America.) with Gov. Winthrop, landing at Boston, Mass. Shortly after this he led a party of people to Witherfield, Conn. as their minister”



Annie A Van Cott, The Female Ancestors /Losee Van Cott in Am/ Europe p 110

1641 Conn, America “The Rev. Richard Denton[Sr] of Catherine Hall, Yorkshire, England

In 1630 he emigrated to America … Shortly after this he led a party of people to Witherfield, Conn. as their minister… In 1640-1 he led another party to Stamford, Conn. where he founded the Congregational Church.”



Annie A Van Cott, The Female Ancestors /Losee Van Cott in Am/ Europe p 110

1642 about Where? “Margrietje Barents (note- b abt 1642) who was most likely a daughter of Barent Arentszen and

Marrietje Cornelis as they were witness to the baptism of Margrietje’s first child, Cornelis, who would be named after his paternal grandfather and also his maternal grandmother.”

5 Mar 1676, marries Lourens Corneliszen Koeck

Annie A Van Cott, The Female Ancestors /Losee Van Cott in Am/ Europe p 87

1644 Conn. “The Rev. Richard Denton[Sr] of Catherine Hall, Yorkshire, England

“… led a party of people to Witherfield, Conn. as their minister… led another party to Stamford, Conn. From the his­tory of Stamford we learn that in 1644 a colony composed of



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