United states marine corps weapons training battalion marine corps marksmanship center of excellence



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CMC-11R

07 Feb 06



UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS

WEAPONS TRAINING BATTALION

MARINE CORPS MARKSMANSHIP CENTER OF EXCELLENCE

MARINE CORPS COMBAT DEVELOPMENT COMMAND

QUANTICO, VIRGINIA 22134 5040

LESSON PLAN


INTRODUCTION TO MARINE CORPS RIFLE MARKSMANSHIP

CMC-11R




COMBAT MARKSMANSHIP COACHES’ COURSE



REVISED 02/07/2006

APPROVED BY _____________________________ DATE _______________


UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS

WEAPONS TRAINING BATTALION

MARINE CORPS MARKSMANSHIP CENTER OF EXCELLENCE

MARINE CORPS COMBAT DEVELOPMENT COMMAND

QUANTICO, VIRGINIA 22134 5040

INSTRUCTOR PREPARATION CHECKLIST
ESSENTIAL DATA
LESSON DESIGNATOR CMC-11R
LESSON TITLE Introduction to Marine Corps Rifle Marksmanship
DATE PREPARED 07 February 2006
TIME 10 mins
METHOD Lecture
LOCATION Indoor/outdoor classroom
INSTRUCTORS REQUIRED One
REFERENCES MCRP 3-01A and MCO 3574.2_
TRAINING AIDS/EQUIPMENT None

UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS


WEAPONS TRAINING BATTALION

MARINE CORPS MARKSMANSHIP CENTER OF EXCELLENCE

MARINE CORPS COMBAT DEVELOPMENT COMMAND

QUANTICO, VIRGINIA 22134 5040



DETAILED OUTLINE
INTRODUCTION TO MARINE CORPS RIFLE MARKSMANSHIP
INTRODUCTION (1 MIN)
1. GAIN ATTENTION. The ability to engage targets accurately is a skill learned by every Marine. The Marine Corps Rifle Marksmanship Program is designed to teach and reinforce marksmanship skills for both entry-level and experienced shooters. The marksmanship coach is a vital element of the marksmanship program. He is the primary individual on the range who works closely with shooters to help develop and refine their marksmanship skills. The coach is also the resident at the unit who prepares shooters for annual requalification firing through simulation, dry, and live fire exercises. The success of the Marine Corps Rifle Marksmanship Program is due largely to the efforts and expertise of dedicated coaches who hone shooters skills.
2. OVERVIEW. This lesson provides an overview of the Marksmanship Coach Course.
3. INTRODUCE LEARNING OBJECTIVES. This lesson provides an introduction to the Combat Marksmanship Coaches’ Course. There are no Terminal or Enabling Learning Objectives for this lesson.
4. METHOD. A classroom setting with an instructor lecturing is used for this lesson.
5. EVALUATION. Marines are not evaluated on the material presented in this lesson.

TRANSITION: The Marine Corps Rifle Marksmanship Program is designed to teach and reinforce fundamental shooting skills. It is structured to systematically build a shooter’s training to a combat-ready level of proficiency. This approach to marksmanship training is the key to developing effective combat marksmen.
BODY (8 MINS)
1. (5 MINS) MARINE CORPS RIFLE MARKSMANSHIP PROGRAM
a. Four-Table Program. Rifle marksmanship is taught using four progressive tables: Known Distance (KD) Firing (Table I), Basic Combat Marksmanship (Table II), Intermediate Combat Marksmanship (Table III) and Advanced Combat Marksmanship (Table IV). Tables I–IV teach Marines the application of marksmanship fundamentals to function as an individual or part of a unit engaged in combat.
1) Preparatory Marksmanship Training. The unit conducts this table of training. The unit coach is responsible for training Marines through a series of simulation, dry, and live fire exercises. During this table, Marines develop a sound foundation of marksmanship knowledge and practice skills under close supervision of the coach. Table I training is critical as many shooting problem corrections can occur, before the Marine ever begins live fire training. Table I provides the basis for all follow-on training in Tables II – IV. Correct firing techniques must become second nature. Therefore, it is important to develop and master weapons handling and basic marksmanship skills during this stage of training. After completing Table I, shooters’ proficiency is determined by the following:
a) Performing weapons handling procedures with the service carbine/rifle.
b) Performing preventive maintenance on the service rifle/carbine.
2) Table I: KD Firing. Table I training is conducted by the rifle range personnel. The coach on the range is responsible for coaching Marines through dry and live fire exercises.
a) During I training, the marksmanship skills learned in Preparatory Marksmanship Training are applied on a KD range where further development and refinement of those skills achieved during live fire.

b) This table provides the opportunity to apply the fundamental marksmanship skills learned to date. Therefore, it is essential that the Marine practice and employ correct firing techniques, and make a continued effort to master weapons handling skills. Immediate feedback is critical to identify areas where the shooter needs improvement.


c) Upon completion of Table I, a shooter must demonstrate proficiency in his ability to engage stationary targets with the service rifle/carbine at known distances. In addition, proficiency in zeroing the service rifle/carbine is demonstrated during this table of training in the Marine Corps Combat Marksmanship Program (MCCMP).
3) Table II: Basic Combat Marksmanship. Both the unit and the rifle range personnel conduct training within Table II, although the rifle range personnel play a larger role. The coach in the unit is responsible for coaching Marines through dry and live fire exercises. In Table II training, Marines take the marksmanship fundamentals taught in Tables I and II and apply them in a variety of field firing conditions. Table II training further refines these techniques, until they become instinctive. This table also helps the Marine develop increased confidence with his weapon. Where possible, Table II training is conducted immediately upon completion of Tables I. After completing Table II, shooters must demonstrate proficiency in the following:
a) Zeroing
b) Presentation: single shot, control pair, hammer pair, and failure drill.
c) Engaging targets of limited exposure (time).
d) Engaging targets from standing to kneeling.
e) Engaging multiple targets.
f) Engaging moving targets.

4) Table III: Intermediate Combat Marksmanship. In

this table the Marine further advances his knowledge of combat marksmanship with a more advanced course of fire.

The Marine will be able to fire this course of fire with

iron sights or with a rifle optic. The Marine will also

be required to pass a night qualification course. To

qualify Table III proficiency must be demonstrated in

the following:

a) Field expedient BZO with iron sight or rifle

optic, to include any night firing devices.

b) Presentation: single shot, control pair, hammer pair, and Mozambique drill.

c) Engaging targets while wearing field protective mask.


d) Pivots: left and right.

e) Engaging while moving forward.

f) Pivoting into forward movement.
g) Engaging targets at unknown distances.
h) Engaging targets in low light/darkness.
5) Table IV: Advanced Combat Marksmanship. In Table

IV all of the skills learned in Table III are reinforced

with the use of the rifle combat optic. The

Marine will learn how to engage targets using his weak

side. He will also learn how to engage targets while

moving laterally. The Marine is required to pass a night

qualification course. To qualify Table IV proficiency

must be demonstrated in the following:


a) Immediate threat: control pair, hammer pair, and

Mozambique drill.


b) Engaging from weak side.
c) Engaging with a single shot to the head.
d) Pivoting: right/left, and 180 degrees.


  1. Engaging while moving forward and laterally.




  1. Short range qualification course.




  1. Engaging targets of unknown distances.




  1. Engaging target in low light/darkness.


Confirm by questions.






TRANSITION: The coach is responsible for assisting shooters to develop and refine basic and applied marksmanship skills for effective target engagement in both a KD and field firing environment. The Combat Marksmanship Coaches’ Course (CMCC) is structured in support of the MCCMP. An explanation of the organizational structure of the CMCC follows.

2. (3 MINS) ORGANIZATION OF THE COMBAT MARKSMANSHIP COACHES’ COURSE
The first half of the Combat Marksmanship Coaches’ Course covers coaching techniques in support of rifle marksmanship, while the second half covers pistol marksmanship. The Combat Marksmanship Coaches’ Course is organized as follows:
a. Lecture-based Instruction. In this course, students receive training on the specific responsibilities and coaching techniques of a coach. Much of the instruction is provided through lecture and demonstration.
1) In addition to coaching instruction, the rifle lesson plans present the MCCMP marksmanship techniques targeted to the shooter. This enables the instructor to review and reinforce marksmanship techniques with students as well as, assess their knowledge. It is important to note that CMCC training focuses on coaching techniques rather than shooting techniques.
2) In addition to coaching instruction, the pistol lesson plans from the Entry Level Program (ELP) are presented in totality. Some Marines attending the course may have never fired a pistol nor received exposure to the ELP. A coach must first understand the techniques in ELP prior to coaching.
b. Practical Application. Throughout training, students divide into two groups of “shooters” and “coaches”. Coaches rotate in and out of dry and live fire exercises. This enables each coach to practice coaching a block of three shooters at a time. In addition, students receive practical application scenarios for setting up and conducting exercises. Students also participate in a realistic setting that mimics the unit/range, enabling them to practice and reinforce course skills.
c. Evaluation. Students are evaluated through a series of performance evaluations conducted throughout the course. Students are also evaluated on their ability to coach shooters through various dry and live fire exercises. In addition, a final written exam is administered, covering the knowledge-based material presented throughout the course.

Confirm by questions.






TRANSITION: The material just covered illustrates how much there is to master in marksmanship training. Equally, it highlights how influential a coach’s role is in assisting shooters to become effective marksmen.

SUMMARY: (1 MIN)
The success of the Marine is based largely on the skill, quality, and dedication of his coach. Marksmanship proficiency is the foundation of military effectiveness in ground combat operations. The coach is trained to assist shooters in developing and refining necessary combat-ready riflemen skills.




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