Year 12 vce literature 2013 A. T 1 Week 4, term 1 Here are the key instructions from the official vcaa documentation Outcome 1 Unit 3 Literature



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YEAR 12 VCE LITERATURE 2013

A.T.3.1 WEEK 4, TERM 1
Here are the key instructions from the official VCAA documentation
Outcome 1 Unit 3 Literature

Analyse how meaning changes when the form of a text changes.



This outcome will contribute 40 marks out of 100 marks allocated to School-assessed Coursework for Unit 3. It will be assessed by at least one task, which will contribute a total of 40 marks.

Task/s

Description

This task requires an analysis of how the form of a text influences meaning and will be presented in written form.

The aim of the assessment task is to allow you to:

identify the way forms of texts are significant in the making of meaning

identify and discuss the conventions used in particular forms of texts

analyse the ways in which the original and transformed texts are constructed

identify the similarities and differences between the original and the adapted or transformed text

comment on and explore the significance of changes made in the adaptation or transformation and their effects on the ways meaning is created

have the opportunity to demonstrate the highest level of performance.

Conduct of our Outcome 1 Assessment Task at St Leonard’s College


  • The task will be completed during class-time on Wednesday 20th and Thursday 21st February

  • You may bring your copy of the novel and a hand-written or printed electronic copy of the note-taking grid into class with you.

  • You will handwrite your response in a St Leonard’s College exam booklet.

  • I will collect the exam booklet at the end of Wednesday’s lesson and return it to you for completion in Thursday’s lesson.

  • You do not need to write a draft.

  • No dictionaries allowed. You should have any key vocabulary you might use listed in your note-taking grid.

  • You will choose one of the statements provided on the Assessment Task.

Performance descriptors from the VCAA Assessment Handbook – Look over them carefully!

The following descriptors provide a guide to the standards expected when setting and marking assessment tasks. They describe the knowledge and skills typically demonstrated by students who have achieved scores within each range on the assessment task/s.



Outcome 1

Analyse how meaning changes when the form of a text changes.



MARK RANGE

DESCRIPTOR: typical performance in each range

33–40 marks

Thorough and complex understanding of the ways in which the form of a text is significant in the making of meaning. Comprehensive knowledge of the conventions in the forms
of both the original and transformed texts. Excellent use
of terminology appropriate to the relevant forms of text. Sophisticated analysis of the ways in which meaning is altered when the text is transformed. Considered selection
and highly-effective use of textual evidence to support an interpretation. Highly-expressive and coherent development of ideas.

25–32 marks

Thorough understanding of the ways in which the form of a text is significant in the making of meaning. Detailed knowledge of the conventions in the forms of both the original and transformed texts. Very good use of terminology appropriate to the relevant forms of text. Insightful analysis
of the ways in which meaning is altered when the text is transformed. Careful selection and effective use of textual evidence to support an interpretation. Expressive and coherent development of ideas.

17–24 marks

Some understanding of the ways in which the form of a text is significant in the making of meaning. Sound knowledge of the conventions in the forms of the original and transformed texts. Appropriate use of terminology in relation to the selected text forms. Some analysis of the ways in which meaning is altered when the text is transformed. Relevant selection and use of textual evidence to support an interpretation. Clear and coherent development of ideas.

9–16 marks

Some awareness of the ways in which the form of a text is significant in the making of meaning. Some knowledge of the conventions in the forms of the original and/or transformed texts. Some use of relevant terminology in relation to the selected text forms. Limited discussion of the ways in which meaning is altered when the text is transformed. Some relevant selection and/or use of textual evidence to support an interpretation. Clear expression of ideas.

1–8 marks

Limited awareness of the ways in which the form of a text is significant in the making of meaning. Limited knowledge of the conventions in the forms of the original and/or transformed texts. Little use of relevant terminology in relation to the selected text forms. Little or no identification of the ways in which meaning is altered when the text is transformed. Limited selection and/or use of textual evidence to support an interpretation. Simple expression of ideas.


Possible SAC Topics

We will discuss which are your favourites in class. Four will appear on the A.T.


  1. “In his adaptation of Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, Ridley Scott transforms Dick’s novel, which presents the story of an animal obsessed bounty hunter in a futuristic world, into a filmic exploration of the way in which replicants are a device used for reflection on what it is to be human.” Discuss.




  1. “In ‘Blade Runner’, Ridley Scott has transformed the complex social, technological and ethical issues which permeate Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, into a film which goes far beyond special effects.” Discuss.




  1. “The motto of the Tyrell Corporation is ‘More Human than Human’. Discuss the ways in which Philip K. Dick’s exploration of humanity is transformed by director, Ridley Scott, in the film ‘Blade Runner’.”




  1. ‘Blade Runner’ clearly has its genesis in Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, but the film’s scope is much more than that of the novel. Discuss.




  1. It is easier to read Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep simply as a story of the human search for meaning than it is to read ‘Blade Runner’ in this way. Discuss.




  1. It matters more in ‘Blade Runner’ than Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep whether or not the characters are human? Discuss.




  1. ‘Speciesism’, whether human, animal or android, is more crucial to Dick’s novel than to the film, ‘Blade Runner’. Discuss.




  1. The novel, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, and its film adaptation, ‘Blade Runner’, both provide important warnings to the human race. However, Ridley Scott’s film delves less deeply into the human need for connection and spirituality. Discuss.


Unit 3 VCE Literature: Transforming a text
What do we mean by this?
A dictionary would tell us that to ‘transform’ something means to change the appearance, substance or character of an original. Just like ‘Transformer’ toys!

So literary texts can be altered, re-arranged, re-ordered, re-shaped, re-cast, adapted or converted into something new.

But whilst the point of the transformed toys is that the source toy should not be recognisable, in literary transformations, the audience should always be aware of the original source. The source text may undergo any one or more of a number of changes. The text may, for example, change its
Genre a novel may be adapted for radio or TV; a bible story may be

retold in the style of a tabloid newspaper


Plot alternative endings might be provided or a happy ending
Mood a ‘tough’ text could be rewritten ‘tenderly’ or a humorous

text more seriously


Perspective parts of a story could be re-told from another character’s point of

View.
Characterisation Central characters could be given different personalities


However, the transformation should not be so great or so radical that all sight of the original is lost. To recognise the original text in the transformation is, of course, part of the pleasure for the listener or reader.
So how does the adaptation take place?


  • Classic novels adapted into one-off plays, 4-6 TV episode serial. Eg ‘Middlemarch’, ‘Vanity Fair’, ‘Pride and Prejudice’,

  • Short stories adapted for TV. Eg Roald Dahl’s ‘Tales of the Unexpected’

  • Novels and short stories adapted into movies. Eg ‘Jaws’, ‘The Birds’, ‘Macbeth’, ‘Blade Runner’, ‘The Shipping News’, ‘Harry Potter’

  • Shakespeare himself was a great transformer of original texts. Very few of his plays have entirely original plots. Eg ‘Richard III’, ‘Macbeth’ and ‘King Lear’


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