Atg learning Academy 955 Louis Drive



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ATG Learning Academy

955 Louis Drive

Warminster PA 18974

267-803-1751


Course Guide
2013-2014
English

Readings within the program are selected to meet the developmental needs of students and to provide them with a broad background in both classic and contemporary literature, beginning with a ninth grade course which is organized by literary genre. Writing is taught as a process of thinking and of creating meaning.  At each level, class time is devoted to the development of skills in each area of the writing process: pre-writing, drafting, revising, editing, and proofreading.  As students move through the program, they are expected to write longer and more complicated essays.  Assignments include personal and persuasive essays, creative writing assignments, and formal literary analysis.  Grammar is included writing instruction. Every year our students have a research project, which includes an oral and power point presentation.



Course Name - Course ID

English 9: Introduction to literature and writing skills. - 809

READ INDEPENDENTLY:

Purposes for Reading

Word Recognition Skills Vocabulary Development Comprehension and Interpretation

Fluency


READING CRITICALLY:

Detail Inferences

Fact from Opinion

Comparison Analysis and Evaluation

ANALYZING AND INTERPRETING:

Literary Elements

Literary Devices

Poetry


WRITING STYLES:

Drama


Narrative

Informational Persuasive

QUALITY WRITING:

Narrative

Informational

Persuasive

SPEAKING AND FUNCTION:

Listening Skills

Speaking Skills

Discussion

Presentation

CHARACTERISTICS AND FUNCTION:

Word Origins

Variations

Application

RESEARCH:

Selection

Location of Information

Organization



English 10 - 810

READ INDEPENDENTLY:

Purposes for Reading

Word Recognition Skills Vocabulary Development Comprehension and Interpretation

Fluency


READING CRITICALLY:

Detail Inferences

Fact from Opinion

Comparison Analysis and Evaluation

ANALYZING AND INTERPRETING:

Literary Elements

Literary Devices

Poetry


WRITING STYLES:

Drama


Narrative

Informational Persuasive

QUALITY WRITING:

Narrative

Informational

Persuasive

SPEAKING AND FUNCTION:

Listening Skills

Speaking Skills

Discussion

Presentation

CHARACTERISTICS AND FUNCTION:

Word Origins

Variations

Application

RESEARCH:

Selection

Location of Information

Organization



English 11 - 811

READ INDEPENDENTLY:

Purposes for Reading

Word Recognition Skills Vocabulary Development Comprehension and Interpretation

Fluency


READING CRITICALLY:

Detail Inferences

Fact from Opinion

Comparison Analysis and Evaluation

Use teacher and student established criteria for making decisions and drawing conclusions.

ANALYZING AND INTERPRETING: Literary Elements

Literary Devices

Analyze and evaluate in poetry the appropriateness of diction and figurative language.

Select appropriate electronic media for research and evaluate the quality of the information received.

Explain how the techniques used in electronic media modify traditional forms of discourse for different purposes

WRITING STYLES:

Drama


Narrative

Informational Persuasive

Include varying characteristics (e.g., from limerick to epic, from whimsical to dramatic).

QUALITY WRITING:

Narrative

Informational

Persuasive

Use precise language and specific detail

Write a personal résume.

SPEAKING AND FUNCTION:

Listening Skills

Speaking Skills

Discussion

Presentation

Introduce relevant, facilitating information, ideas, and opinions to enrich the discussion.

CHARACTERISTICS AND FUNCTION: Word Origins

Variations

Application

Explain and evaluate the role and influence of the English language within and across countries.

RESEARCH:

Selection

Location of Information

Organization

Select sources appropriate to the breadth and depth of the research (e.g., dictionaries, thesauruses, other reference materials, interviews, observations, computer databases).




English 12 - 812

READ INDEPENDENTLY:

Purposes for Reading

Word Recognition Skills Vocabulary Development Comprehension and Interpretation

Fluency


READING CRITICALLY:

Detail Inferences

Fact from Opinion

Comparison Analysis and Evaluation

Use teacher and student established criteria for making decisions and drawing conclusions.

ANALYZING AND INTERPRETING: Literary Elements

Literary Devices

Analyze and evaluate in poetry the appropriateness of diction and figurative language.

Select appropriate electronic media for research and evaluate the quality of the information received.

Explain how the techniques used in electronic media modify traditional forms of discourse for different purposes

WRITING STYLES:

Drama


Narrative

Informational Persuasive

Include varying characteristics (e.g., from limerick to epic, from whimsical to dramatic).

QUALITY WRITING:

Narrative

Informational

Persuasive

Use precise language and specific detail

Write a personal résume.

SPEAKING AND FUNCTION:

Listening Skills

Speaking Skills

Discussion

Presentation

Introduce relevant, facilitating information, ideas, and opinions to enrich the discussion.

CHARACTERISTICS AND FUNCTION: Word Origins

Variations

Application

Explain and evaluate the role and influence of the English language within and across countries.

RESEARCH:

Selection

Location of Information

Organization

Select sources appropriate to the breadth and depth of the research (e.g., dictionaries, thesauruses, other reference materials, interviews, observations, computer databases).




English Comparative Literature - 820

The goals of this course are to have the students to read independently and critically while analyzing and interpreting literary elements. As we read novels, plays and short stories, we journey through time and space: The worlds of ancient Egypt and Greece, exotic India and Nepal, medieval Europe, 19th century Japan, and the modern world. We study witchcraft and sorcery, Scandinavian mythology, Russian Celtic fairy tales, mythical beast and monsters, surrealist poetry and many other exciting areas of literature. Each year incorporates and builds on material taught in the preceding years.


English Debate - 825

The emphasis on development and understanding of the resolution comprehending debate theory, developing speaking skills and construction of debate cases.


English Elementary English Language Arts - 830

Is a course that focuses on reading, writing, and communicating.


English Language Arts - 835

Is a course that focuses on reading, writing, and communicating.


English Reading - 840

Using classic and/or modern literature, students will work towards improving vocabulary and comprehension; identifying plot devices; making connections between texts; and interpreting and/or analyzing the effects of the organization of text.


English Technology Research Information and Public Speaking - 845

This course is designed to teach students to access and utilize information on the Internet, paraphrase information responsibly, use PowerPoint, contribute articles to the ATG Achiever, and the rudiments of public speaking. (Formerly called TRS)


English Vocabulary - 850

This course is intended to expand students’ vocabularies. The focus is on word recognition, comprehension, and competent usage, rather than spelling.


English Writing - 855

This course helps the student integrate grammar and rhetoric into the writing process.


The Media Straight Up - 860

This curriculum was created by media education leader and scholar Renee Hobbs of Temple University. Contemporary mass media offers both positive and negative messages and it illustrates two ways to gain skills that will enhance people’s critical thinking skills about the mass media. One is to carefully analyze media messages, looking closely at the techniques used to convey meaning. Another is to gain experiences in creating one’s own media messages.


Paraphrasing - 865

The paraphrasing course has been designed to help students deal more effectively with the complex reading demands of the secondary and post-secondary setting. It is a strategy designed to improve recall of main ideas and specific facts. Research has shown that students’ comprehension and retention scores increase in proportion to the quality and quantity of the paraphrase statement they make while reading a passage.


Business Writing - 870

Students will demonstrate the ability to complete non-verbal communications required by employer (accident reports, dental forms, health insurance, life insurance forms, and work orders). The student will be proficient in the ability to recognize factors for effective writing (clarity, tone, organization, delivery). The student will understand how to structure, format and write quickly when appropriate and understand the appropriate use of email in an organizational setting.


Wilson Language Program - 875

The Wilson Reading System is a complete curriculum for teaching decoding and encoding (spelling) beginning with phoneme segmentation. WRS directly teaches the structure of words in the English language so that students master the coding system for reading and spelling. Wilson Reading System teaches students fluent decoding and encoding skills to the level of mastery; it also includes sight word instruction, fluency, vocabulary, oral expressive language development, and comprehension.


English Wilson 6+ - 880

Phonemic Segmentation; Alphabetic Principle (sound/symbol relationships); Decoding; Encoding (spelling); Advanced Word Analysis (including syllable division rules); Vocabulary Development; Sight Word Instruction; Fluency; Comprehension with Visualization.



HISTORY

History program is to empower students to become responsible citizens of the United States and the world, using their knowledge and skills to understand changes and to solve problems.


American History I - 901

Identify and evaluate the political and cultural contributions of individuals and groups of United States history prior to 1890. Identify and evaluate primary documents, material artifacts, and historic sites. Evaluate how continuity and change has influence United States history. Identify and evaluate conflict and cooperation among social groups and organizations in the United States history.


American History II - 902

Identify and evaluate the political and cultural contributions of individuals and groups of United States history from 1890 to Present. Identify and evaluate primary documents, material artifacts, and historic sites important in United States history from 1890 to Present. Evaluate how continuity and change has influence United States history from 1890 to present. Identify and evaluate conflict and cooperation among social groups and organizations in the United States history from 1890 to the present.


Civics - 905

In this course, students will gain an understanding of the American Government, of its different parts and functions, as well as how it is different from other types of governments.


Current Events - 910

Students utilize resources such as the newspaper and the computer to find out what is currently going on in the world.


Geography - 915

The student will use maps, globes, photographs, and pictures in order to obtain geographical information and apply the concepts of location, scale, and orientation

The student will use maps, globes, photographs, and pictures in order to create and compare political, physical, and thematic maps.
History of World Wars - 921

Events which led to the start of WWII, the significance of technology to the Holocaust, the role of the USA in WWII and the repercussion of WWII on the USA and the rest of the World.
The History of World War II - 922

The Second World War was a turning point for millions of the world’s citizens, from those who fought the war to those who suffered bombardments, imprisonment, dislocation, and death.  It was also a turning point in the history of the United States and many other nations of the world, establishing the Atomic Age, the United Nations, and the Cold War. During this course, we will examine the causes of the war, the battlefronts and home fronts, military strategies and diplomacy, the role of pacifists and of conscientious objectors, and the social and economic impact of warfare. We will view the war from various perspectives, examining eyewitness accounts and letters from different sides. Final project is the student’s assessment of a movie about World War II.


Law and Criminal Justice - 930

Definition of Law, its function and emergence; Victimless crimes: Criminality as a status; Stratification and criminal status; Sociology of police; Styles of police; Law enforcers and law violators; Criminal stigmatization; Organized crime; Police administration; Police corruption and solutions; Probation and parole; Prisons; Lecture, discussion, film, guest speakers, and field trips.


Modern China - 935

Identify and evaluate the political and cultural significance of the contributions of individuals and groups to the history of modern Asia from 1850 to present. Students will evaluate historical documents important to China’s history and how continuity and change throughout China’s history has impacted belief systems, religions, commerce, industry, and social organization since 1850.


Multi-Cultural Studies - 940

This course surveys American history with an eye toward engaging the students with plight and heroism of different ethnic groups and important historical figures therein.


Native American - 945

A study of the North American Indian including daily life, social relationships, myths, legends, and their fate at the hands of European settlers in the New World. To gain a working knowledge of the Native American especially during the period prior to the twentieth century. To learn to employ insights gained from an understanding of the experience of the American Indian in an effort to understand the reality for racial and ethnic minorities throughout the world. To draw connections between significant conflicts and issues of the Indian experience and analogous conflicts and issues today.


World History - 950

Evaluate the significance of individuals and groups who made major political and cultural contributions to world history since 1450. Evaluate historical documents, material artifacts, and historic sites important to world history since 1450. Evaluate how continuity and change throughout history has impacted belief systems and religions, commerce and industry, innovations, settlement patterns, social organization, transportation and roles of women since 1450. Evaluate how conflict and cooperation among social groups and organizations impacted world history from 1450 to Present in Africa, Americas, Asia, and Europe.


Philosophy: Metaphysics and Epistemology - 955

This course will examine the order that we impose on the world and the meaning we derive from that order. Students will accomplish this through the close examination of two branches of philosophy: Metaphysics and Epistemology. Metaphysics is concerned with the basic nature of reality. Its aim is to give a systematic account of the world and the principles that govern it. Epistemology deals with the origin, nature, and limits of knowledge. The philosophers students will study are Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Bacon, and Hume. Additionally, through articles in newspapers and magazines, students will have opportunities to apply the concepts they have learned to contemporary issues.


United States Government and Politics - 960

This course focuses on the Constitutional underpinnings of American government and explores the role of government and the practice of politics in American life.  Students will study political philosophy and ideology, political parties and interest groups, Congress and the Presidency, public opinion, bureaucratic behavior, civil rights and civil liberties, and constitutional law.  Following current political news and participating in a local or national campaign in the fall elections will be required. Reading will include the daily newspaper and several other texts; some recent ones have been Richard Hofstadter’s The American Political Tradition and Alexander Hamilton et al., The Federalist Papers.


MATHEMATICS
The Upper School Mathematics program provides a broad and rich exposure to Algebra, Geometry, Precalculus, Calculus, and Statistics. Class discussions are vital and interactive, and provide the backbone for courses.
Pre-Algebra 1 - 001

Collect, organize, display, and analyze data using measures of central tendency (median, mean, mode) and measures of spread. Create, continue to understand and apply patterns to solve problems. Use, understand, and apply vocabulary and symbols of arithmetic, algebra and geometry. Solve simple linear equations and inequalities for one variable. Understand and apply numbers within Real number system. Compute and estimate using four basic operations. Locate and describe points on a coordinate plane. Identify and describe the characteristics of two and three-dimensional shapes. Develop proportional reasoning in problem solving. Use appropriate tools and techniques to determine linear, square, and cubic measurements. This course will cover the pre-algebra curriculum so that students will be prepared to begin Algebra I after completion of this class.


Pre-Algebra 2 - 002

This is a continuation of Pre-Algebra 1, which a two year course.


Algebra 1 - 011

This course is intended for students who have little or no background in Algebra I and students who would benefit from a review of algebra as additional preparation for future math courses.   It will cover the algebraic and geometric algorithms necessary to enable the students to begin both Algebra II and Geometry with confidence in their accuracy of calculations and competency in conceptual understanding of algebraic processes.


Algebra 2 - 012

The Algebra II course exposes students to the ideas and applications of mathematical modeling, completes acquisition of basic skills in algebraic manipulation, and introduces a shift in perspective, which is characteristic of study of higher mathematics. To this end, basic equations, functions, and their graphs are studied.  Topics introduced in Algebra I are explored in more depth, with greater sophistication in methods of manipulation required. Students work with equations and inequalities, linear relations and functions, systems of equations and inequalities, sequences and series, quadratic functions, polynomial functions, rational expressions and conic sections.


Pre-calculus - 020

The course of study begins with right-triangle trigonometry and the six trigonometric functions, as well as manipulation of these functions in both radians and degrees.  Students will develop skills to identify and sketch graphs of trigonometric functions and transformations of these graphs.  Algebra skills remain a key tool for analysis throughout the course, especially in the unit involving trigonometric identities.  Students will also undertake the study of advanced topics in algebra and a comparative look at functions and their graphs. Material covered will include trigonometry, law of Sines and law of cosines, functions and their graphs, quadratic functions, exponential and logarithmic functions and topics in analytical geometry.  Graphing techniques are emphasized and mastered through hands-on work, then applied and extended using either the TI-83 Plus or TI-84 Plus graphing calculator, one of which is required for this course. 


PREREQUISITE: Algebra 2
Introductory Calculus - 021

After a thorough review of topics from Algebra II and Precalculus, students in this course will work towards mastery of the basic elements of calculus, including theory, computation, and application of derivatives and integrals.  Calculus topics explored include limits, analysis of functions and their graphs, average and instantaneous rates of change, optimization, motion along a line, and areas under curves.  This course provides students with a first experience with the concepts and techniques fundamental to calculus. Students taking this course will have a solid foundation on which to build.  Either the TI-83 Plus or the TI-84 Plus graphing calculator is required.


Elementary Functions - 030

The course will include the topics of linear and quadratic functions, polynomial functions, rational and irrational functions, and exponential and logarithmic functions.


Math Elementary - 035

Elementary math for grade school students first through sixth. Addition, subtraction, symbols, money, place value, fractions, measurement, patterns, temperature, perimeter, circumference, area, volume, capacity, ordered pairs, line plots and graphs, algorithms, multiplication, division, ratio, formulas, factors, angles, triangles, quadrangles, line segments, rays, decimals and more.


Geometry - 040

The Geometry course covers the main topics of geometry, such as polygons, congruence, similarity, area, volume, and perimeter. These will be explored from several perspectives, including transformational and analytic geometry, in addition to the traditional approach. While not a main focus, formal proof will be a part of this course. Students will also be exposed to right-triangle trigonometry for the first time. In addition, students may use software programs to reinforce concepts learned in class.


General Math - 045

An individualized grade/skill-appropriate curriculum was created to target specific areas for improvement.



Math Refresher - 050

This course allows students to have automaticity in math facts.


Mathematics - 055

This course includes Operations and Algebraic Thinking, Number and Operations in Base Ten, Number and Operations – Fractions, Measurement and Data, Geometry, Ratios and Proportional Relationships, The Number System, Expressions and Equations and Statistics and Probability


Math Saxon - 060

This is one of the nation's most thoroughly researched core mathematics programs for grades K–6.  Saxon's unique pedagogical approach-based on instruction, practice, and assessment distributed across grade levels-incorporates more than 25 years of research and classroom experience. 
Statistics - 065

The statistics course is an excellent option for any student who has successfully completed work in Algebra regardless of the student’s intended college major. This course can be taken in conjunction with other mathematics courses as Elementary Functions or Calculus.


Math Finance - 070

SCIENCE
Science is an expression of man’s curiosity about the natural world. This curiosity leads us to ask questions, look for patterns, propose solutions, test generalizations, and draw conclusions.  These activities form the basis of the Scientific Method, which is the foundation of our science program. Courses in each discipline are used to explore the concepts of biology, chemistry, and physics skills required for living.  Each course has a laboratory component; independent laboratory-research projects are required of all students in honors and advanced level courses.

Students new to the school may be asked to take the Science Reasoning Assessment and to submit a letter of recommendation from their most recent science teacher.


Astronomy - 500

This is the science dealing with space, the solar system, and the stars.
Biology - 510

Focuses on the natural environment: the air, water, and land as well as the plants, animals, and microorganisms that inhabit them. Course content includes topics from physical, earth, chemical, and biological sciences in an attempt to achieve a clear understanding of the complexities of the natural world and our place in it. Emphasizes cell biology, genetics, and molecular biology.


Chemistry - 520

The core topics of inorganic chemistry are introduced in a logical sequence to give students an understanding of the nature of matter, its composition, and structure, and the changes matter undergoes.  Problem solving and laboratory work are important aspects of this course.


Earth Life and Physical Science - 530

Recognize and analyze the complex and diverse ecosystems found on earth. Acquire the knowledge necessary to identify renewable and nonrenewable resources, and analyze factors influencing their availability. Acquire the knowledge necessary to analyze the complexity of environmental health. Recognize the importance of agriculture to society and evaluate past and current management practices in the agriculture business. Analyze how human action and natural changes affect the balance within an ecosystem and evaluate the trade-offs, costs, and benefits of conservation and environmental management. Evaluate the impact of cycles on ecosystems. Explain the significance of diversity in an ecosystem and analyze biodiversity as it relates to the stability of an ecosystem. Examine the effects of extinctions on the environment and their affects on human and natural systems. Analyze how society’s needs relate to the sustainability of natural resources and technology’s role in natural resource sustainability


Physics - 540

Physics is a qualitative study of the central concepts of physics with emphasis on mental imagery that relates to things and events common to our everyday environment.  The principles of physics, mechanics, thermodynamics, light and optics, acoustics, electromagnetism and atomic and nuclear physics will be approached through a process of exploration, concept development, and application.



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Health Education - 700

This course provides a means to develop and maintain a healthy lifestyle and good decision-making. The goals of the courses are to introduce and explain the concept of wellness; provide current information on health issues; assist the student in developing a balanced lifestyle through understanding of the inter-relatedness of the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual realms in making a healthy individual; provide an opportunity for students to examine and evaluate their personal relationships; and provide opportunities for the development of decision-making and critical-thinking skills.


Physical Education - 710

This course contributes significantly to the growth, development, and well-being of teenagers. Movement is at the very center of adolescents' lives, permeating all facets of their behavioral development— the psycho-motor, cognitive, and affective domains.  In the belief that the development of their own interests will result in regular physical activity, students are able to make their own choices in activities.  Instructors will regularly assess each student’s participation, attitude, and behavior.


Tai Chi - 720

PA classes take place three times a day and each last fifteen minutes, during which academic students perform a series of stretches and exercises whose purpose is to stimulate the brain as well as the body.



SOCIAL SKILLS
Cycle of Life Socialization Group - 300

Educational and therapeutic programs designed for school age children, adolescents, and young adults. Placement into groups depends on child’s developmental age and individual therapeutic needs.


Social Skills - 310

Students have the opportunity to express their feelings about their learning differences. Various mediums of expression are utilized, including but not limited to writing, discussion, use of color, drawings, and symbols.



FOREIGN LANGUAGE
Spanish I - 401

Students are introduced to various aspects of Hispanic/Latino Culture.


Spanish II - 402

Students have more complex vocabulary, grammar, and sentence structures. Students are also introduced to various aspects of Hispanic/ Latino/Culture.


Chinese - 410

ELECTIVES
Art - 725

Exploring all aspects of Art.


Consumer Education II - 730

Interpretation of fabrics. Understanding patterns to construction a garment. Maintain a sewing machine. Student will complete a garment during this class.


Digital Photography - 075

This course is designed to introduce the student to the use of the computer as a tool in the manipulation of photographic images. The student will learn how to create digital images using Adobe Photoshop to acquire, compose, alter, manipulate, and format images for commercial, fine are or everyday use. Additionally the student will learn how to use scanned images and digital cameras. Assignment will focus on the development of computer graphic skills necessary for success in the fields of graphic design and digital imaging. A series of specific visual design problems will be used.


Executive Function - 320

This a class directed at language-learning disabilities for interventions that focus on executive function, self-regulatory and language processes in order to promote students' independent functioning.


Homework Helper - 080

This course is designed to help students complete their homework assignments.


Introduction to Computers - 085

This hands-on course deals with personal computers in a wide variety of settings. Topics include basic computer concepts, operating systems, the Internet, email, and the use of computer applications including word processors, spreadsheets, and graphics. The laboratory is an essential part of this course. Students will complete at least one assignment in each of the following topic area: Word Processing, Spreadsheet, Internet Research, and Graphics.


Music - 740

Introduction to music including basic reading, piano, ear training, and rhythm.


SAT Prep - 090

Prep class prepares students for the SAT test. The emphasis is on building familiarity with the three sections of the test: Critical Reading, Math, and Writing. Both content and strategies are incorporated to help students become more comfortable taking the SAT.


Theater Production – 750/890

In the process of this course, students will become familiar with the different steps of a theater production from read-through to dress rehearsal and preview, as well as the various disciplines that go along with any theater production, such as costumes, set, sound & lights, dramaturgy, etc. Students will be given responsibilities that test both their discipline and their creativity. In theater, the show will go on. Failure to complete tasks or solve problems in time will be evident in a flawed final production. Time management, focus, teamwork and the ability to seek instruction when needed are essential to working successfully in the theater.



NEUROPLASTICITY

 

Arrowsmith Program – 600 to 620



The Arrowsmith Program is based on neuroscience research demonstrating that it is possible to address learning disabilities by identifying and strengthening weak cognitive capacities. The goal of the Arrowsmith Program is to help students strengthen the weak cognitive capacities underlying their learning dysfunctions and to enable them to become effective, confident and self-directed learners for life. The Arrowsmith Program deals with the root causes of the learning disability rather than managing its symptoms. Students become effective learners without having to compensate for their learning disabilities. Their ability to perform complex tasks is improved when the weak cognitive areas are strengthened. Students return to a full academic program at their appropriate grade level without the need for further support or modification.
Lumosity - 630

Lumosity is based on the science of neuroplasticity, your brain's ability to strengthen and grow. Multiple research papers have been published on Lumosity's effectiveness and with its ongoing research collaborations, Lumosity continues to improve its ability to change your brain. Multiple studies have been published on Lumosity's ability to improve key abilities such as working memory, visual attention, fluid intelligence, and executive function. No matter what your age, improving these core cognitive abilities can improve real-life abilities.



THERAPIES
EASe - 640

The purpose of all Electronic Auditory Stimulation effect (EASe) products is to stimulate, challenge, and promote sensory processing in children experiencing difficulty with sensory processing and organization.


Speech Therapy - 650

Based on the student’s prescription.


OT – Occupational Therapy - 660

Based on the student’s prescription.





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