Curriculum document state board of education howard n. Lee, C



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Pacing (Continued)


Pacing is only suggested. Pacing will differ based on student interests and skills. Teachers, too will differ in the ability to integrate goals and objectives into exciting units for students.
In this subject of history, it is not easy to break topics into time increments since all topics continue to lead into the next: that is what history does. However, since this is to be a tested subject area, it becomes necessary to give an overview of a plan to complete the curriculum as well as the course. These suggested class days do not include time for testing and reviewing.



Competency Goal 1: The New Nation (1789-1820) - The learner will identify, investigate, and assess the effectiveness of the institutions of the emerging republic.


Objective 1.01: Identify the major domestic issues and conflicts experienced by the nation during the Federalist Period.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

Establishment of federal power and supremacy over the states
Development of the first two-party system
Strict & Loose Interpretation of Constitution

Judiciary Act of 1789

Bill of Rights

Hamilton’s Economic Plan

Whiskey Rebellion

Democratic-Republican Party



Federalist Party

Election of 1800

“Midnight Judges”

Laissez-faire

Marbury v. Madison, (1803)

John Marshall

Louisiana Purchase

Alien & Sedition Acts

Virginia & Kentucky Resolutions

Hartford Convention (1814)



1.01a Draw political cartoons illustrating the different beliefs of the Federalist and Democratic-Republican Parties.
1.01b Complete a “Mystery Documents” exercise. After researching philosophies of Thomas Jefferson & Alexander Hamilton, students are given famous quotes and statements (from primary documents) produced by Jefferson & Hamilton. Discuss quotes and have students identify which quotes Jefferson or Hamilton authored.

Bill of Rights

Hamilton’s Reports

Letters and publications produced by Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton

Alien & Sedition Acts

Virginia & Kentucky Resolutions

Jefferson’s First Inaugural Address


Audio & Visual Resources


A New Nation (Schlesinger Video Company)

Founding Brothers (History Channel)

NARA – Analyzing Documents, Doc. Analysis Worksheets








Competency Goal 1: The New Nation (1789-1820) - The learner will identify, investigate, and assess the effectiveness of the institutions of the emerging republic.

Objective 1.01 (continued): Identify the major domestic issues and conflicts experienced by the nation during the Federalist Period.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities







1.01c Create campaign posters and speeches supporting Jefferson or Adams during the Election of 1800.
1.01d Research and debate which president was “best” or “Most Effective” (Washington, Adams, Jefferson). Establish criteria for deciding.
1.01e Produce a video “talk show” in which students portray Federalist Era leaders and their philosophies regarding States’ Rights and Federal Power.

The Duel (PBS American Experience)

Websites (can be used for each goal)


Thomas Jefferson:

http://etext.virginia.edu/jefferson/

Alexander Hamilton:



http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/duel/

www.Odur.let.rug.nl

www.Memory.loc.gov




Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology, Audio and Visual, and Key Documents for Listed Activities
Objective 1.01
Judiciary Act of 1789

http://usinfo.state.gov/usa/infousa/facts/democrac/8.htm

The Bill of Rights



http://www.billofrightsinstitute.org

http://www.archives.gov/national_archives_experience/bill_of_rights.html

Alexander Hamilton



http://xroads.virginia.edu/~CAP/ham/hamilton.html

http://www.eh.net/encyclopedia/cowen.banking.first_bank.us.php

The Whiskey Rebellion



http://www.whiskeyrebellion.org/rebell.HTM

http://earlyamerica.com/earlyamerica/milestones/whiskey/page1.html

The Election of 1800



http://www.multied.com/elections/1800.html

http://www.kidsource.com/education/election.html

http://www.archives.gov/exhibit_hall/treasures_of_congress/page_7.html#

The Midnight Judges



http://www.whitehousehistory.org/04_history/subs_journal/frame_a03_07.html

Marbury v. Madison



http://www.jmu.edu/madison/marbury/

http://usinfo.state.gov/usa/infousa/facts/democrac/9.htm

http://www.nv.cc.va.us/home/nvsageh/Hist121/Part3/Marbury.htm


Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology, Audio & Visual, and Key Documents for Listed Activities
Objective 1.01 (continued)
The Louisiana Purchase

http://www.nps.gov/jeff/mowe-thomas.htm

http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/presiden/jeffpap.htm

http://intranet.cps.k12.il.us/Lessons/StructuredCurriculumTOC/SCSocial_Science/HS_US_History_Daily_Lessons_/SCSSUS1/SSUS026038.pdf

The Alien and Sedition Acts



http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/alsedact.htm

http://earlyamerica.com/earlyamerica/milestones/sedition/

http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/history/A0803344.html

The Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions



http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h466.html

http://www.nv.cc.va.us/home/nvsageh/Hist121/Part2/KyVaRes.htm

The Hartford Convention of 1815



http://www.barefootsworld.net/hartford.html



Competency Goal 1: The New Nation (1789-1820) - The learner will identify, investigate, and assess the effectiveness of the institutions of the emerging republic.


Objective 1.02: Analyze the political freedoms available to the following groups prior to 1820: women, wage earners, landless farmers, American Indians, African Americans, and other ethnic groups.

Major Concepts


Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

Conflicts with American Indians
The status of slavery during The Federalist Era
The place of women in the society during
The disparities between classes in the new nation

Suffrage requirements


Tecumseh

Cotton Gin

Eli Whitney

“Necessary Evil”

Emancipation

Treaty of Greenville 1796




1.02a Working in cooperative groups, complete a fishbone diagram analyzing the political freedoms available to women, workers, landless farmers, American Indians, free blacks and slaves during the Federalist Era.

1.02b Contrast American Indian and United States citizens’ cultural views toward land ownership and religion.




Letters of Abigail Adams

Tecumseh’s Protest of the Treaty of Fort Wayne (1809)

Thomas Jefferson’s letter: “A Fireball in the Night”

Audio and Visual Resources:

“Africans in America” (PBS Series)

Suggested Websites:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/

http://www.nwhp.org

http://www.memory.loc.gov

http://www.Americasstory.com

http://www.Archives.gov

http://www.ushistory.com

http://thehistorycalendar.com

http://www.heroes4us.com




Competency Goal 1: The New Nation (1789-1820) - The learner will identify, investigate, and assess the effectiveness of the institutions of the emerging republic.


Objective 1.02: (continued) Analyze the political freedoms available to the following groups prior to 1820: women, wage earners, landless farmers, American Indians, African Americans, and other ethnic groups.


Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities







1.02c Complete chart and map exercises illustrating how the cotton gin increased the demand for slaves and accelerated settlement of lands occupied by American Indians.

1.02d Develop a list of alternative policies the US government could have used to improve the social conditions of women, African Americans, and American Indians during the Federalist Era. Explain why each alternative would have been accepted or rejected by citizens of the time period.



Literature Connection:

James Fennimore Cooper: The Deer Slayer (excerpts)
Fine Arts Connection:

George Catlin: “No Horns on His Head”

NMAA, 1832

Washington Allston: “Hermia and Helena” NMAA 1818

John Haidt: “Young Moravian Girl”

NMAA 1780

Thomas Durant: “Dover Plain” NMAA, 1828




Competency Goal 1: The New Nation (1789-1820) - The learner will identify, investigate, and assess the effectiveness of the institutions of the emerging republic.


Objective 1.03: Assess commercial and diplomatic relationships with Britain, France, and other nations


Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

Early Foreign Policy
The failure of peaceful coercion
Freedom of the high seas and shipping rights
The impact of European events on United States foreign policy


XYZ Affair

Convention of 1800

Impressment of seamen

Embargo Act 1807



President Washington’s

Proclamation Neutrality

President Washington’s

Farewell Address

War Hawks

War of 1812


1.03a Create an illustrated timeline identifying the major foreign policy events of the Federalist Era.
1.03b Design “bumper stickers” protesting or supporting American military action during the XYZ Affair.



President Washington’s Farewell Address

“OGRABME” Political Cartoon

President Madison’s War Message

Hartford Convention Resolutions



Audio and Visual Resources:

“Expansion” Schlesinger Video Company


The Jackson Years-The New Americans”

Learning Corporation of America

“Founding Brothers” History Channel

“Biography Of America Video Series” Episode 5: “A New System of Government”

Annenberg CPB






Competency Goal 1: The New Nation (1789-1820) - The learner will identify, investigate, and assess the effectiveness of the institutions of the emerging republic.


Objective 1.03: (continued) Assess commercial and diplomatic relationships with Britain, France, and other nations.


Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities




Battle of New Orleans

Treaty of Ghent

Adams-Onis Treaty

Jay’s Treaty

Pinckney’s Treaty


1.03c Compare and contrast Washington’s Farewell address to current U.S. foreign policy issues.
1.03d Write letters to the U.S. Congress of 1812 from the perspective of War Hawks or New England Federalists about the pending war.


Fine Arts Connections:

Thomas Moran: “Excelsior Geyser, Yellowstone” NMAA

Enoch Gridley: “Memorial to Washington” 1810, NMAA

Margarett Smith: “Sacred to Washington”

1822, Baltimore Museum of Art

Suggested Websites:

http://www.thegateway.org

http://www.historychannel.com

http://www.ushda.org

http://www.americanhistory.about.com



Competency Goal 2: Expansion and Reform (1801-1850) - The learner will assess the competing forces of expansionism.

Objective 2.01: Analyze the effects of territorial expansion and the admission of new states to the Union 1801 to 1850.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

The rationale for and the consequences of Manifest Destiny
Federal Indian policy before The Civil War
The political and economic importance of the West


Missouri Compromise


The Indian Removal Act 1830

Sequoyah

Worchester v. Georgia, 1832


Trail of Tears

White man suffrage

The Alamo

Election of 1844

Texas Annexation

“54-40 or Fight!”

Mexican War

Wilmot Proviso

Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo

49ers


2.01a Create “Territorial Expansion” jigsaw puzzles. Students can trace and cut out puzzle pieces representing the territorial acquisitions of the lower 48 states on cardboard and write notes on the back of each piece to explain how it was acquired. Exchange puzzles and compare notes.
2.01b Write personal letters to President Polk supporting or protesting the Mexican War.


President Polk’s War Message

Lincoln’s Spot Resolutions

Excerpts from Lewis and Clark Diaries

The Lewis and Clark Journals

Through Indian Eyes, The Untold Story of

Native American People: Reader’s Digest

Publication, 1995.

Audio and Visual Resources:

Expansionism” Schlesinger video series

Lewis and Clark: The Journey of the Corps of Discovery” PBS-Ken Burns





Competency Goal 2: Expansion and Reform (1801-1850) - The learner will assess the competing forces of expansionism.

Objective 2.01: (continued) Analyze the effects of territorial expansion and the admission of new states to the Union 1801 to 1850.


Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities




Stephen Austin

Gadsden Purchase

Lewis and Clark

Oregon Trail




2.01c Create posters celebrating the advantages of territorial expansion.
2.01d Analyze the painting “Trail of Tears”. See analysis sheet in Section Five. Include visual imagery and feelings.


Suggested Websites:

http://www.nps.govt

http://cgi.pbs.org/per/.lewisandcl

http://cvip.fresno.com

http://www.history.sfasu.edu/history/133

http://www.civics-online.org/library
Fine Arts Connection:

John Gast: “American Program”, 1872

Museum of Western Heritage, LA

Robert Lindeux: “The Trail of Tears”

Thomas Le Clear: “Interior with Portraits” NMAA

Frank Blackwell Mayer: “Independence”

NMAA, 1858





Competency Goal 2: Expansion and Reform (1801-1850) - The learner will assess the competing forces of expansionism, Nationalism, and sectionalism.

Objective 2.02: Describe how the growth of nationalism and sectionalism were reflected in art, literature, and language.


Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

Cultural expressions of patriotism
Celebrating the common man and the American way of life
Influence of the Transcendentalist Movement

Noah Webster

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Henry David Thoreau

Neoclassical Architecture



Washington Irving

Edgar Allen Poe

Nathaniel Hawthorne

James Fennimore Cooper



Hudson River School of Artists

Alex de Tocqueville



2.02a Compare images of neoclassical architecture (Monticello, US Capitol, etc.) to examples of Roman structures. How are the lines different?

2.02b View the image of 1836 George Washington statue by Horatio Greenough. Discuss or write analysis of why Americans embraced neoclassical styles.

2.02c View landscape paintings by Thomas Cole and Asher Durand, and genre works by William Sidney Mount, etc. Summarize the images and explain how the works celebrate the spirit of nationalism.


Literature Connection: Excerpts:

Emerson: “Self-Reliance

Thoreau: “Civil Disobedience”

“Walden”


“Slavery in Mississippi”

Hawthorne: selected stories

Douglass: Autobiography

De Tocqueville: “Democracy in America”

Theodore Weld: “American Slavery As It Is, `1839

McGuffey’s Reader







Competency Goal 2: Expansion and Reform (1801-1850) - The learner will assess the competing forces of expansionism, Nationalism, and sectionalism.

Objective 2.02: (continued) Describe how the growth of nationalism and sectionalism were reflected in art, literature, and language.


Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities







2.02d Compare and contrast the painting “Cotton Plantation” by Giroux and “After The Sale” by Eyre Crowe in the different presentations of slavery in America.
2.02e Allow students to present, in art or literature, examples of how this time period displayed a new sense of nationalism.
2.02f What concepts of the Transcendentalist Movement show a change in American society? Make a list and share in groups.

Fine Arts Connection:

Portraits of Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Douglass, Poe, et al.

Landscapes by Cole and Durand

Genre works by Mount

Paintings by Giroux and Crowe

Enoch Perry: “The True American” Metropolitan Museum of Art

Thomas Cole: “The Last of the Mohicans”, 1827, New York Historical Assoc.
Suggested Web Sites:

http://www.nmaa.si.edu/

http://www.nga.gov

http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/nationalsim




Competency Goal 2: Expansion and Reform (1801-1850) - The learner will assess the competing forces of expansionism, Nationalism, and sectionalism.

Objective 2.03: Distinguish between the economic and social issues that led to sectionalism and nationalism.


Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

Transformation of life in the early industrial revolution
Cultural polarization of Antebellum America


Samuel Morse

Eli Whitney

John Deere

Cyrus McCormick

Robert Fulton

Erie Canal

Cotton Kingdom

1st Industrial Revolution

Nativism

Know-Nothings

William Lloyd Garrison

Frederick Douglass



2.03a On a US ma, indicate economic and technological developments of the time period.
2.03b Use a graphic organizer to show the growing divide between the North and the South in issues of religion, education, and economics.
2.03c Research and analyze the impact of innovations and inventions of the period on American society.

Copy of The Universal Law of Slavery by George Fitzhugh

John C. Calhoun’s Defense of Slavery

Copies of the Liberator and the North Star

James Hammond, The Congressional Globe, March 4, 1858



Literature Connection:

Garland: “Under the Lion’s Paws”

Henry James: “Four Meetings”

Fine Arts Connection:

W. S. Mount: “Music Hath Charms”

Asher Durant: “Dover Plain” NMAA,1848

Thomas Chambers:” Capture of H.B.M. Frigate Macedonian by U.S. Frigate U.S.

NMAA, 185




Competency Goal 2: Expansion and Reform (1801-1850) - The learner will assess the competing forces of expansionism, Nationalism, and sectionalism.

Objective 2.03: (continued) Distinguish between the economic and social issues that led to sectionalism and nationalism.


Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities







2.03d Write an editorial to a local paper opposing discriminatory practices in hiring, housing, education, etc. during this time period.


Thomas Hicks: “Calculating” 1844, Boston Museum of Fine Arts

James Clonney: “Militia Training” 1841

Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts

Suggested Web Sites:

http://www.education-world.com

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4h314t.htm



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