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Telecommunications Industry Association

TR-30.2/09-04-004

(TIA)










Arlington, VA April 1, 2009





DOCUMENT SUBMITTED TO

TR-30.2 Meeting


The document to which this cover statement is attached is submitted to a Formulating Group or sub-element thereof of the Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) in accordance with the provisions of Sections 6.4.1-6.4.6 inclusive of the TIA Engineering Manual dated March 2005, all of which provisions are hereby incorporated by reference.


SOURCE: Chair TR-30.2
CONTACT: Fred Lucas
FAL Associates
Telephone: 410-239-0248
Email: fred.lucas@ieee.org
TITLE: Copy of Baseline text for a new Recommendation V.AMAT
PROJECT:
DISTRIBUTION: Members of TR-30.2


INTENDED PURPOSE OF DOCUMENT:

____

FOR INCORPORATION INTO A TIA PUBLICATION

_X__

FOR INFORMATION ONLY

____

OTHER (please describe):


____________________
ABSTRACT
This document provides a copy of the Baseline text for a new Recommendation V.AMAT from the 27 January to 6 February 2009 meeting of ITU-T Study Group 16.



INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATION UNION

STUDY GROUP 16

TELECOMMUNICATION
STANDARDIZATION SECTOR

STUDY PERIOD 2009-2012



TD 18R1 (WP 1/16)

English only

Original: English

Question(s):

14/16

Geneva, 27 January - 6 February 2009

TEMPORARY DOCUMENT

Source:

Rapporteur Q14/16

Title:

Baseline text for a new Recommendation V.AMAT

The following is modified text based upon the original content of TD18 (WP1) for V.AMAT. This text follows the instructions given and recorded in the report of Q11/16 from the July 2007 meeting see below).

the proposed base line text to be considered for new Recommendation V.AMAT. This text was reviewed at the previous meeting of SG16 and contained in TD 205/WP1.
Note from Rapporteur:

The following is an extract from the Q11 section of the WP1 report from the July 2007 meeting on the topic of this document.

It was unanimously agreed that the scope of the proposed new Recommendation shall be limited to document only the AT commands in terms of their definitions and actions they perform. The existing text contained in TD-205 (WP1) will have to be modified to comply with this agreement.”

The Editor of this document whas to remove text which does not pertain to the actual definition of the AT commands that are covered by the intended application.


This text was reviewed at the January /February meeting of Study Group 16. It was agreed to continue with the format as partially used. This is consistent with the format used in the V.25x series of Recommendations. Note: Not all of the commands have been formatted, this is considered work in progress.

It was also noticed that while the commands call out error codes for many of the responses no commands have been defined. This needs to be resolved. Also deficient is the definition of the response to several test syntax variations of the command. It is hoped that this text October 2009 meeting.



CONTENTS

1 Keywords 26

2 26

3 Introduction 26

4 A community that promotes fair and comprehensive access to advanced information and communication services for all citizens must ensure that those citizens whose disabilities are such that they cannot use devices “designed-for-all” are not excluded from the common access policies. 26

5 In principle, all citizens expect to have access to information through technology mediated services and devices. In the context of this report, this implies that all citizens can choose to have access through mobile platforms, and to choose the complexity of the devices and the range of services that meet their needs, at reasonable and equitable costs. 26

6 Some users with disabilities, however, are unable to use conventional devices and services, even those designed according to the “design-for-all” principles, as their disabilities are too severe or their requirements conflict with those of people with a different disability. In this case, these users should be able to choose the communication devices that they need to use, and to easily and cheaply enhance those devices and services with an adaptation appropriate to their needs. Examples could include a speaking output adaptation for blind people or icon representation of functions for people with reduced reading skills. 26

7 In order for this objective to be realised, communication devices and services should be implemented with a standardized set of interfaces that can be the channel through which these adaptations become integrated with the rest of the system. Without this standardized interface, each adaptation will require significant technical expertise and effort, and will consequently be expensive and practically unrealistic. People with disabilities will be confined to using a small subset of the available devices and services, and will not be able to join other citizens in selecting devices and services according to personal preferences (e.g. style, design, functionality), but instead will have to persist with using specific devices long after they have ceased to be supported by manufacturers and operators, simply because it is impossible to replace them. 26

8 A standardized set of interfaces will, therefore, encourage growth in the market for communication devices and services by enabling the large numbers of disabled and elderly people who are currently excluded to participate, and the strength of the rehabilitation technology market, particularly the small and medium enterprises that currently dominate this sector. 26

9 As one candidate technology that is present in all communication devices is AT commands, the work to promote increased accessibility and adaptability of the communication devices is expected to include the upgrading of existing standards where the necessary AT commands [6, 7] do not exist (as recommended in "Requirements for assistive technology devices in ICT", [1]). 26

10 Requirements on this set of interface standards have been collected in a process which has involved manufacturers of external devices and groups representing the user with different special needs. The results have been presented to appropriate standards fora and mainstream communication device manufacturers. 27

11 1 Scope 27

12 2 References 27

13 [29] 2002/21/EC: "Framework Directive" (2002/21/EC) Available at http://europa.eu.int/eur-lex/pri/en/oj/dat/2002/l_108/l_10820020424en00330050.pdf 29

14 [30] "Universal Service Directive" (2002/22/EC) Available at http://europa.eu.int/eur-lex/pri/en/oj/dat/2002/l_108/l_10820020424en00510077.pdf 29

15 [31] COCOM 04-08: "Report from the inclusive communications (INCOM) subgroup" 29

16 [32] Roadmap towards Accessible Communication. Draft report from TCAM eWGD on accessible ICT 2006-10-19, Sub-group 1: Accessible Communication. Available at http://circa.europa.eu/Public/irc/enterprise/tcam/library?l=/public_documents/tcam_21/1-tcam-ewgd1-draft/_EN_1.0_&a=i 29

17 [33] Symbian OS™ v9.1 Product description, Sander Siezen, Symbian™, February 2005 29

18 [34] Radio Interface Layer (RIL) White Paper, Microsoft Corporation, June 2004 29

19 [35] Report on Access to Mobile Telephony for Handicapped Persons. CCR, French Telecommunications Regulator Working Group on Access to Mobile Telephony for handicapped Persons (October 2003). Available at http://www.art-telecom.fr/uploads/tx_gspublication/rapport-balin-eng.doc. 29

20 3 Definitions 29

3.1 Terms defined elsewhere: 29

21 3.1.9 SIM Application Toolkit [10]: A set of applications and related procedures which may be used during a GSM session 30

22 4 Abbreviations and acronyms 30

23 USIM 31

24 Universal Subscriber Identity Module 31

25 VAS 31

26 Value Added Services 31

27 VBS 31

28 Voice Broadcast Service 31

29 VGCS 31

30 Voice Group Call Service 31

31 VOCA 31

32 Voice Output Communication Aid 31

33 5 Conventions 31

34 6 Background and issues 32

35 6.1 Introduction 32

36 This clause introduces the problem space and the current status of assistive technology and communication device technology. 32

37 Abilities and disabilities are explained in the guideline document EG 202 116 on "Human Factors guidelines for ICT products and services; Design for All" [3]. The guideline document describes the characteristics of a wide range of users with disabilities and provides details of their impairments and the resulting disabilities related to ICT products and services. In the context of the present document, the following broad classes of abilities are highlighted, and when impaired, they affect the use of mobile technologies: 32

1 sensory abilities such as seeing, hearing, touch, taste, smell and balance; 32

2 physical abilities such as speech, dexterity, manipulation, mobility, strength and endurance; 32

3 cognitive abilities such as intellect and memory; 32

4 language abilities such as speaking, reading, literacy and comprehension. 32

38 These abilities are also described in the document CEN/CENELEC Guide 6 [26] and in the ITU-T FSTP Telecommunications Accessibility Checklist [20], which provide guidelines for standards developers to address the needs of older people and people with disabilities. The range of disabilities put requirements on services and devices. Some of those requirements can be met by following the "Design for All" guidelines [3]. However, some users, often with multiple disabilities need additional assistance in the form of adaptations to conventional devices. It is therefore important to collect requirements in this area and the present document builds therefore on the results provided in the technical report on "Requirements for assistive technology devices in ICT" [1]. The ITU-T F.790 [21] document provides Telecommunications accessibility guidelines for older persons and persons with disabilities. Therefore, the present document provides recommendations based on requirements listed in existing documents and a gap analysis where existing AT commands have been reviewed (see clause 7). Clause 8 presents suggested solutions related to the development of communication devices in order to facilitate the development and use of external devices. Clause 9 presents specific recommendations and the need for AT commands to support those recommendations. 32

39 6.2 Assistive technology interfacing 32

40 6.2.1 When external devices are needed 32

41 Some users with disabilities cannot use communication technologies, even those designed using "design-for-all" principles [3, 25]. In some cases, the requirements for different disabilities conflict with the requirements for other disabilities. Therefore, what is required for those users is a standard solution for adaptation. 33

42 6.2.2 Classification of external devices 33

43 Current assistive technology is classified in the international standard ISO 9999 [24]. Although it covers a vast number of devices ranging from abacuses and abdominal hernia aids to zip pullers and zippers, only a few of the devices listed in that standard have the potential to be interconnected to ICT services and devices. The technical report TR 102 068 on "Human Factors (HF); Requirements for assistive technology devices in ICT" [1] has therefore listed those external devices which can be interconnected to ICT systems, see table 1, together with their codes according to the ISO 9999 [24] classification system. 33

44 Table 1: Relevant external devices in ISO 9999 [24], listed in [1] 33

45 Classification code 34

46 Description 34

47 12 39 06 34

48 Electronic orientation aids 34

49 12 39 09 34

50 Acoustic navigation aids (sound beacons) 34

51 21 06 03 34

52 Image enlarging video system 34

53 21 06 06 34

54 Character reading machine 34

55 21 09 03 34

56 Input units (e.g. speech recognition) 34

57 21 09 06 34

58 Keyboard and control systems 34

59 21 09 09 34

60 Printers and plotters (e.g. Braille) 34

61 21 09 12 34

62 Displays 34

63 21 09 15 34

64 Devices for synthetic speech 34

65 21 09 27 34

66 Software for input and output modification 34

67 21 15 09 34

68 Dedicated word processors 34

69 21 15 15 34

70 Electric Braille writers 34

71 21 24 34

72 Aids for drawing and handwriting 34

73 21 33 09 34

74 Decoders for videotext 34

75 21 33 12 34

76 CCTV 34

77 2136 06 34

78 Mobile telephones and car telephones 34

79 21 36 09 34

80 Text telephones 34

81 21 36 10 34

82 Visual telephones and videophones 34

83 21 42 09 34

84 Portable dialogue units 34

85 21 42 12 34

86 Voice generators 34

87 21 42 15 35

88 Voice amplifiers 35

89 21 45 35

90 Hearing aids 35

91 21 45 15 35

92 Tactile hearing aids 35

93 21 48 03 35

94 Door signals 35

95 21 51 03 35

96 Personal emergency alarm systems 35

97 21 51 06 35

98 Attack alarms for epileptics 35

99 21 51 09 35

100 Fire alarms 35

101 24 09 35

102 Operating controls and devices 35

103 24 12 35

104 Environmental control systems 35

106 The list in table 1, from [1], cannot be considered to be exhaustive but it provides some indication of the extensive range of possibilities for interconnecting external devices to ICT systems. An important category of external devices not listed in table 1 is “Software for Total Conversation” with classification code 21 36 90. As can be seen, in some cases the external device may be a mainstream device normally used for another purpose (e.g. a mobile phone used as a text phone). 36

107 6.3 Scope of AT commands 36

108 Originally developed for computer modems in 1977 by Hayes Microcomputer Products, AT commands have matured from being a modem control technology to be a comprehensive and pervasive middleware platform for communication devices. AT commands provide control of calls, the SIM card, phone information, phone settings, packet domain, network services, and mobile termination in the communication device [6]. Currently, sets of AT commands has been standardized, but only a few AT commands of these are mandatory. However, many communication devices do not have this standardized set fully implemented. In addition, a number of manufacturers of communication devices have extended the AT command set to cover additional functions in the phone such as file storage, camera, etc. The manufacturers have gathered these extensions to the AT command set as company specific documents, some of which are publicly available, some of which are not. It is likely, though difficult to verify, that not all communication devices from the same manufacturer will have the full set of standardized and proprietary AT commands implemented within it. 36

109 6.4 Limitations 36

110 Currently, there is only a very limited range of assistive solutions available for communication devices, as the adaptations used by people with disabilities are only compatible with a few models of communication devices. External device and adaptation developers state that this is due to selective implementations of the standard AT command set, since not all of the commands specified in 3GPP TS 27.007 are mandatory [6]. Therefore, the external devices need to be tuned to match each specific communication device model. The consequences are higher development costs of external devices and also that the external device users only have limited choices when acquiring a new communication device (see scenario in appendix II). Also, these users might be limited to doing very basic tasks such as making and receiving calls and use the SMS service. 36

111 Realistically, it is understood that new communication device technologies are developing rapidly. Therefore the standardized AT command set will need to be periodically updated and revised. All communication devices should by definition carry the standardized AT command set in a firmware library and use the subset of AT commands necessary to make the particular phones functions available to users. In this way, external device manufacturers (or indeed any company interested in making generic accessories for communication devices) will have the confidence to know that an adaptation will work with all devices that have the function being adapted. 36

113 7 Gap analysis 37

114 7.1 Introduction 37

115 In order to identify the gap between what is available and what is the needed, an analysis has been performed in order to investigate whether additional standardized AT commands are needed. 37

116 The gaps were identified in two ways: 37

5 by comparing the functionality of a typical communication device with available AT commands. 37

6 by comparing the needs of users with disabilities with available AT commands. 37

117 The needs of users with disabilities, as well as the need for new standardized AT commands, were identified through stakeholder input such as questionnaires, interviews, emails and workshops. 37

118 The annex and appendixes provide further details on how the gap analysis has been performed. The input to the gap analysis of the functionalities of communication devices versus standardized AT commands is summarized in annex A. Appendix I A provides details on issues related to various communication devices. Appendix II illustrates various user scenarios. 37

119 There are, in principle, three types of gaps concerning AT commands: 37

7 Complete: A complete gap indicate that there is no AT command available at all. 37

8 Standardization: A standardization gap occurs when there are proprietary AT commands available for specific functionalities implemented on the communication device(s), but there is no corresponding standardized AT command. 37

9 Implementation: An implementation gap occurs when a standardized AT command for a specific functionality is not implemented on a specific communication device. A proprietary AT command for a specific functionality may, or may not, be implemented on the specific communication device within a manufacturers’ portfolio. 37

120 In practice, the functionalities listed below as a implementation gap, depend on communication device type. Some of the functionalities described below as standardization gaps, may for some communication device types, not have any proprietary AT commands and could therefore be considered as belonging to sub-clause 7.2. 37

121 7.2 Complete gaps 38

122 Comparing the functionality of a typical communication device with the available standardized or proprietary AT command sets, the gaps described in the following sub-clauses were found. More details on the gap analysis is provided in annex A. 38

123 7.2.1 Colour 38

124 Visually impaired people often find it easier to read if a specific text and background colour is used. Many dyslexic people find it easier to read when the text is on a background with a specific colour. 38

125 7.2.2 Cursor control 38

126 Mobility-impaired users may need alternative pointing devices (e.g. stylus, finger, head pointer) to control the on-screen cursor. 38

127 7.2.3 Font size 38

128 Small visual details on the interface of communication devices causes problems for people with visual impairments. They may need the option to change the font size. 38

129 7.2.4 Menu 38

130 The use of menus is the main difficulty for visually impaired people [35] when using a mobile phone. For blind people, it is almost impossible to use menus unless they learn them by heart, but being able to listen to spoken menus would help them using their mobile phones. AT commands providing this functionality will give the disabled user the same possibilities of controlling the communication devices as a non-disabled user. 38

131 Currently, the personalization of menus in mobile phones is very poor. Factors that could be subject for personalization, relevant for users with disabilities include the size of menu text, mode (text or spoken menus), colours of text and background. 38

132 7.2.5 Radio 38

133 The radio (e.g. FM) functionality incorporated in mobile phones is becoming increasingly popular and also the users with disabilities desire to be able to use this. 38

134 7.2.6 Screen 38

135 People with vision impairments often find the screens of communication devices too small and many have problems reading the texts and seeing the content. The "send screen dump" functionality could send the screen dump from the communication device to the external device, where it can be presented in a larger size. It is also useful, in some situations, to be able to rotate the screen of the communication device to better accommodate the contents of the screen. 39

136 7.2.7 Speech-to-text 39

137 Using a communication device or an external device can be very time consuming. To simply be able to completely control the communication device, speech-to-text may be required by some users. 39

138 7.2.8 Text telephony 39

139 Hard of hearing or deaf people have traditionally used text telephony for communication. Recently, mobile text telephony services have been made available. These provide a good option for hard of hearing and deaf users when there is no video telephony available or for those who do not know sign language. This new and essential functionality must also be made available through a mobile external device for hard of hearing and deaf users who are unable to use a mobile phone. 39

140 7.2.9 Text-to-speech 39

141 Hard of hearing, deaf or visually impaired users will find it very useful to be able to use the text-to-speech (TTS) functionality. Being able to play text would be very useful for people with speech impairments. For people who are visually impaired, it is vital to be able to listen to for example an SMS. An AT command for this functionality is essential. 39

142 7.2.10 Time-out 39

143 The analysis of user requirements, have showed that users with reduced dexterity or visual impairments have problems using most types of communication devices for various reasons including poor haptic feedback and tiny interface buttons. To enable a larger portion of the population to use communication devices, an AT command for a longer time-out period for many functions is required (see also [1]). 39

144 7.2.11 Video telephony 39

145 For users who are hard of hearing or deaf, mobile video telephony increases the quality of life because it enables these users to have a conversation anywhere with someone in sign language. Hard of hearing or deaf users who are not able to operate a typical mobile phone must still be able to use this functionality. Currently, AT commands for rotating the screen and switching the viewed video to fullscreen mode are lacking. 39

146 7.2.12 Volume 39

147 Audio services (e.g. media players, FM radio) on communication devices are increasingly popular and also users with disabilities desire to use that functionality. Users shall be able to change the volume of media played on the communication device from their external device. 40

148 7.3 Standardization gaps 40

149 Manufacturers have extended the AT command set in a proprietary manner as functionality has been added to communication devices that was not anticipated when the initial standardized set was agreed. As many of these functions are of interest to users with disabilities, the proprietary commands and new functionalities and features shall be standardized as soon as possible in order to provide a generic platform. If this is not done, the cost of adaptation of external devices will remain high, and the development time will remain long. And in addition, the user will be constrained to a small selection of communication devices. 40

150 The following communication device functionality are not covered by standardized AT commands, but there are existing publicly available proprietary AT commands, for one or more communication device types. 40

151 7.3.1 Applications 40

152 An increasingly amount of applications are either included in the communication device at purchase, or they can be included at any time. Also people with disabilities needing external devices may wish to use these applications. However, the use of application functionality at a content and information level is beyond the scope of the present document, but a minimum requirement is that all applications shall provide input, output and control functionality that is usable by all users. 40

153 7.3.2 Audio stream 40

154 For people with speech impairments, feeding an audio stream from an external external device to the communication device is necessary. This will enable a person with a speech impairment to have a normal text conversation using a synthetic voice from an external device. 40

155 7.3.3 Calendar 40

156 Another function where a standardized AT command is lacking, is the calendar, which is a function most non-disabled people take for granted. 40

157 7.3.4 Camera 40

158 The camera functionality incorporated in mobile phones is becoming increasingly popular and also the users with disabilities desire to be able to use the camera functionalities. 40

159 7.3.5 Location services 41

160 Visually impaired people and those with cognitive impairments such as dementia with reduced memory, may often encounter difficulties to locate where they are and where they are going. The use of location services (e.g. using GPS and base station triangulation) can therefore be very useful for these users. 41

161 7.3.6 Messaging 41

162 People with hearing impairments and those with speech impairments are particularly interested in using messaging services. AT commands for SMS are standardized [7], but there are no standardized AT commands for MMS. 41

163 7.3.7 Voice channel input and output 41

164 Users who are hard of hearing and depend on an external device, may want to connect their hearing aid directly to the external device (and not to the mobile phone). 41

165 Users who are speech impaired and use an external device to amplify their speech, or use their external device to speak for them will also benefit from connecting their external device directly to the mobile phone and use their assistive both for audio input and output. 41

166 7.4 Implementation gaps 41

167 Stakeholder input from external device manufacturers clearly indicate the need for better implementations of the standardized AT command set [6]. The implementations need to be complete, that is implement the full standardized AT command set. Better implementations would enable external device manufacturers to offer a wider range of communication devices to their customers and it would also reduce the development costs, making external devices cheaper. 41

168 8 Recommended solutions 41

169 8.1 Introduction 41

170 Currently, the communication devices do not support all standardized AT commands. This also applies to external devices. In addition, a complete set of standardized AT commands corresponding to the full functionality of the communication devices do not exist. Therefore, the external devices must support a multitude of variants of the communication devices. This leads to an increasing complexity of the external devices and high development costs. If instead, standardized AT commands were always used, the development complexity and cost would be lower. This clause describes general recommendations related to the development of communication devices in order to facilitate the development and use of external devices. Clause 9 presents specific recommendations and the need for AT commands to support those recommendations. 41

171 8.2 High level recommendation 42

172 The general principles and recommendations, listed in the INCOM report [31] comprise the following: "Where general production cannot facilitate universal access, manufacturers shall ensure standardized, simple connectivity between their products and assistive technologies". 42

173 8.3 Implementation of standardized AT commands 42

174 The set of AT commands provides the comprehensive and pervasive middleware platform for mobile technologies, in particular mediating between the communication devices and external devices such as assistive technology. Because the full set of standardized AT commands is not necessarily implemented in any specific devices, it is impossible for external device developers to produce generic solutions that can be expected to work with any device that the disabled user would chose to use. The standardized set of AT commands shall be fully implemented, so that developers of assistive technology can provide generic solutions, thereby reducing cost and increasing the market for such products. 42

175 The set of implemented standardized AT commands used in the communication devices shall be publicly available, e.g. on the Internet, so that it will be possible to avoid purchasing communication devices that are incompatible with the users' external devices. 42

176 Recommendation 8.3.a: The standardized set of AT commands shall be implemented in communication devices and external devices, so that developers of assistive technology can provide generic solutions, thereby reducing cost and increasing the market for such products. 42

177 Recommendation 8.3.b: The functionalities and features implemented by standardized AT commands in the communication devices and external devices shall be publicly available, e.g. on the Internet, so that it will be possible to avoid purchasing communication devices that are incompatible with the users' external devices. 42

178 8.4 New AT commands for new functionality 42

179 There is a common problem that people needing to use external devices cannot use the latest functionalities and features implemented in communication devices as the external devices cannot operate the new functionality. The reason is that standardized AT commands do generally not exists for recently developed functionalities and features. A common first step is that the companies develop proprietary AT commands. Therefore, standardizing as many proprietary AT commands as possible, would allow lower development costs of external devices as they would be compatible with a multitude of communication devices. 42

180 Recommendation 8.4: Proprietary commands and new functionalities and features shall be standardized , as soon as possible. 42

181 8.5 Related standardization work 43

182 The present document lists new AT commands that are not limited to current standards, but may also put requirements for further work. For example, work will be needed on a variety of topics, including personalization and user profiles and multicultural communication in order to define preferences and needs in those areas. AT commands involving aspects that can be personalized may be affected by the use of user profiles [4]. Also, user profile management will in some way utilize AT commands. 43

183 It is important to recognize that further standardisation work may also be needed at the operating system and application content levels, where applications are to be added to communication devices, to ensure that they are constructed in a way that are both usable and accessible. Where application style guides exists for phones and operating systems, these need to be reviewed and extended to ensure that they cover accessibility, and where they do not exist, communication device and operating system manufacturers and organisations shall make it a matter of priority to develop one. The details of this work are beyond the scope if the present document. 43

184 The use of URC should be considered in the further work. An interface for AT commands to the URC could also be developed. It could be done in two ways: 43

185 1. On the URC: AT commands are sent to the target device. 43

186 2. On the target: Some other command is sent to the target and is translated to the appropriate AT command in the target environment. 43

187 If URC becomes a well adopted standard, URC could be useful for the external device developers. Approach 2 gives mobile phone manufacturers the possibility to implement a URC interface and hide their proprietary AT commands behind the URC interface. 43

188 9 Assisitive Device Specific recommendations for new AT commands 43

188.1 9.1 Introduction 43

188.2 9.2 Applications 43

188.4 Recommendation 9.2.a: The communication device shall provide an interface with the necessary AT command to allow an external device to use the applications installed on the communication device. 44

188.5 Recommendation 9.2.b: The communication device shall provide an interface with the necessary AT command to allow an external device to download, install and uninstall applications on the communication device. 44

188.6 Recommendation 9.2.c: The communication device shall provide an interface with the necessary AT command to allow an external device to invoke the applications installed on the communication device. 44

188.7 Recommendation 9.2.d: The communication device shall provide an interface with the necessary AT command to allow an external device to operate the applications installed on the communication device. 44

188.8 Recommendation 9.2.e: The communication device shall provide an interface with the necessary AT command to allow an external device to close down the applications running on the communication device. 44

188.9 Users shall be able to: 44

9.1 Access information about available software, to select, purchase and install applications at a functional (not content) level. 44

9.2 Interact with the applications on the device. This implies just that users can actually operate the applications through the user interface input and output interfaces or accessible alternatives. But it does not imply that the applications shall be usable by all users at the content and information levels. This functionality includes the ability to invoke network connectivity and other users (e.g. for multiplayer games) as necessary. 44

188.11 44

188.13 9.3 Audio stream 44

188.14 A person with a speech impairment may need to have a text conversation using a synthetic voice from an external device, by feeding an audio stream from that external device to the communication device. 44

188.15 Recommendation 9.3: The communication device shall provide an interface with the necessary AT command to feed an audio stream to and from the external device. 44

188.17 44

188.18 9.4 Calendar 45

188.19 Modify Display Calendar information can also be synchronized using OBEX over Bluetooth, IrDA or cable, which can be initiated with the standardized AT command +CPROT [6]. 47

188.20 9.5 Camera 47

188.21 Users shall be able to use the camera functionality of the mobile phone, as it means that they can have multiple functions on a single device. This is particularly useful for users with reduced mobility and dexterity who might have a device mounted on a wheelchair. 47

188.22 It shall be possible to change the operational characteristics of the camera and configuration aspects of the operational characteristics of the camera, including exposure, white balance, focus pre-press and zoom etc and whether the camera output is a picture or a video clip. A scenario illustrating the use of camera is described in appendix II. 47

188.23 Recommendation 9.5.a: The communication device shall provide an interface with the necessary AT command to allow an external device to use all the camera functionality. 47

188.24 Recommendation 9.5.b: The communication device shall provide an interface with the necessary AT command to allow an external device to select the camera function. 47

188.25 Recommendation 9.5.c: The communication device shall provide an interface with the necessary AT command to allow an external device to set the camera’s operational parameters. 47

188.26 Recommendation 9.5.d: The communication device shall provide an interface with the necessary AT command to allow an external device to operate all the functions of the camera. 47

188.27 Recommendation 9.5.e: The communication device shall provide an interface with the necessary AT command to allow an external device to choose if photographs and video clips should be stored. 47

188.28 Recommendation 9.5.f: The communication device shall provide an interface with the necessary AT command to allow an external device to choose the location to store photographs and video clips. 47

188.29 Recommendation 9.5.g: The communication device shall provide an interface with the necessary AT command to allow an external device to send the photographs and video clips immediately using an appropriate available method. 47

188.30 Recommendation 9.5.h: The communication device shall provide an interface with the necessary AT command to allow an external device to attribute positional information available in the communication device to the. 47

188.32 47

188.33 9.6 ColourParameters 47

188.34 Description 50

188.35 The +CBKG command sets background colours. 50

188.36 Defined values 50

188.37 : The value of the colour red, in the range of 0-255.


: The value of the colour green, in the range of 0-255.
: The value of the colour blue, in the range of 0-255. 50

188.39 9.7 Cursor control 50

188.40 9.8 Font size 54

188.42 Description 55

188.43 The +CFSZ command sets font size. 55

188.44 Defined value 55

188.45 : The preferred font size in pixels. 55

188.46 9.9 Location services 55

188.47 Visually impaired people and those with cognitive impairments such as dementia, may often encounter difficulties to locate where they are and where they are going. The use of location services can therefore be very useful for these users. This can form the basis of a range of location based assistance and emergency services. 55

188.48 This functionality provides the ability to gather location information from the network (base station triangulation) or from systems such as GPS. The functionality shall include the ability to invoke and configure the function within the phone. These functionalities consume a considerable amount of battery power. Power saving is therefore important so that the user is be able to set them to time-out if inactive after a certain time, and to switch them off easily. 55

188.49 Recommendation 9.9.a: The communication device shall provide an interface with the necessary AT command to allow an external device to invoke the location functionality. 55

188.50 Recommendation 9.9.b: The communication device shall provide an interface with the necessary AT command to allow an external device to configure the operation of the location functionality. 55

188.51 Recommendation 9.9.c: The communication device shall provide an interface with the necessary AT command to allow an external device to set the location services to time-out and switch them off, if inactive after a certain time. 55

188.52 Recommendation 9.9.d: The communication device shall provide an interface with the necessary AT command to allow an external device to switch off the location services. 55

188.54 55

188.56 9.10 Menu 55

188.58 Description 60

188.59 The external device provides the communication device with the user interactions when navigating in menus. 60

188.60 Defined values 60

188.61

: integer type; this is the unique identifier of the menu (more than one menu can have the same name, and it is therefore necessary to have a unique identifier). 60

188.62 : 60

188.63 0 back to previous menu (if any). 60

188.64 1 highlight next menu item. 60

188.65 2 highlight previous menu item. 60

9.3 select/change status of current menu item (e.g. select current menu item or tick check box or radio button if unticked). 60

188.66 9.10.3 Problems with menus 60

188.67 The use of menus is the main difficulty for visually impaired people [35] when using a mobile phone. One important problem is the size of screens on communication devices as they are often small, and especially visually impaired people might prefer to use an external, larger screen (e.g. an external device) for displaying the content. As an alternative to larger screen, spoken menus would also be useful, in particular for blind people. However, when using spoken menus, the privacy issues should be considered. Some users would therefore use a headset in order to prevent other people around hearing the content of the menu. 60

188.68 9.10.4 Advantage compared with screen dump 60

188.69 Screen dumps that could be sent to the larger size screen could be used for displaying static content, but it would not be useful for spoken menus or for personalizing the presentation of content (e.g. having another font colour). It would therefore be more useful if menus could be presented in a standardized way and let the external device receive the logical presentation of the menu so that it could be created and personalized in the external device. 60

188.70 9.10.5 Implementation 60

188.71 The menus shall be internally represented by a list structure and the menu definition as well as the menu operations shall be defined in a standardized way. 60

188.72 9.10.6 Navigating on the communication device 60

188.73 The user could either navigate in the external device or navigate on the communication device. When navigating on the communication device, there is no need to send navigation information via AT commands. Instead, the external device shall be informed when the menu has been updated . 61

188.74 9.10.7 Navigating on the external device 61

188.75 If the user is navigating with the external device, then there is a need for the external device to provide the communication device with the user interactions. 61

188.76 9.11 Messaging 61

188.77 People with hearing impairments and those with speech impairments find messaging services particularly useful. 61

188.78 There are standardized AT commands for Short Messaging Service (SMS) [7], but none for Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS) or e-mail. The messaging functionality includes reading, writing and sending MMS and e-mails. 61

188.79 Recommendation 9.11.a: The communication device shall provide an interface with the necessary AT command to allow an external device to read, write and send MMS. 61

188.80 Recommendation 9.11.b: The communication device shall provide an interface with the necessary AT command to allow an external device to read, write and send e-mails. 61

188.82 61

188.84 9.12 Radio 61

188.85 The radio (e.g. FM) functionality incorporated in mobile phones is becoming increasingly popular and also the users with disabilities desire to be able to use this. 61

188.86 Recommendation 9.12: The communication device shall provide an interface with the necessary AT command to allow an external device to invoke, configure, and operate the radio (e.g. FM) on the communication device. 61

188.88 61

188.90 9.13 Screen 61

188.91 9.13.1 Implementation alternatives 62

188.92 It could be implemented by both AT command and OBEX, which could benefit a wider range of external devices. AT commands is ASCII oriented, whereas OBEX could send the picture in various formats (e.g. jpeg, bmp) which would be more efficient than sending it using ASCII. Also, the pictures could be sent via Bluetooth, for example via the Basic Imaging Profile. 62

188.93 9.14 Speech-to-text 62

188.94 9.15 Text telephony 63

188.95 9.15.4 Implementation 65

188.96 The implementation of text telephony can be done in two ways: 65

9.4 through a mix of transfer over the voice channel and transfer digitally as suggested in 3GPP TS 22.226 [8]. 65

9.5 through the use of IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS) [9] or until IMS is available through the current IP and mobile packet switched networks as suggested by the TCAM eWG [32] 65

188.97 Regardless of the transport method, the same AT command can be used. 65

188.98 9.16 Text-to-speech 65

188.99 9.17 Time-out 66

188.100 9.18 Video telephony 66

188.101 9.19 Voice channel input and output 67

188.102 9.20 Volume 67

Annex Appendix AI
Mobile device functionality and their AT commands 68

Appendix I


Issues related to various mobile devices 70

(This appendix does not form an integral part of this Recommendation) 70

Appendix II
Usage Scenarios 73

188.103 II.1 Introduction 73

188.104 II.2 Buying a new mobile phone 73

188.105 II.3 Using a VOCA over the phone 73

188.106 II.4 Usable menus 74

188.107 II.5 Using a camera on the phone 75

188.108 II.6 Video telephony 75

Bibliography 76




(Full text available only in the electronic version)

Draft new ITU-T Rec. V.AMAT

AT Asynchronous Serial Ccommand Iinterface for Aassistive and mobile Multi-functional Communication Ddevices

AAP Summary

[To be added before Consent]

Summary

This Recommendation is applicable to the interconnection of multi-functional communication devices with devices intended to provide Assisitive capabilities for those communication devices. It defines a range of serial binary commands that comply to the format and general rules of Recommendation ITU-T V.250 via a range of suitable interfaces.

To connect external assistive devices to communication devices a standardized interface is needed. This recommendation defines an AT command interfaces for communication devices primarily intended for external assistive devices but also applicable for a wide range of other external devices. It also addresses the issue of differing implementations of AT commands on communication devices.Source

ITU T Recommendation V.25x was prepared by Question 14 of ITU T Study Group 16 (2009 20012).




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