Noaa corporate office nominations


What was the specific goal, challenge or problem related to the Department=s mission/or Strategic Plan?



Download 1.54 Mb.
Page22/26
Date18.10.2016
Size1.54 Mb.
1   ...   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26

What was the specific goal, challenge or problem related to the Department=s mission/or Strategic Plan?

The contributions of this organization relate to performance outcomes cited in the DOC 2004-2009 Strategic Plan: “Issue forecasts and warnings that help protect life and property and enhance the U.S. economy”.




  • What was the context in which the nominee addressed the goal, challenge, or problem?

In March and April of 2006, wildfires in the Texas Panhandle burned well over a million acres due to extremely dry conditions. On March 12, 2006, more than 900,000 acres burned and 12 people died in nine separate rangeland wildfires. These wildfires were noted by the Texas Forest Service as the largest wildfire acreage ever in the state of Texas.



Fire weather forecasts and red flag watches/warnings were well worded and timely, with “explosive fire potential” noted. Red flag warnings were in place for every wildfire event and doubled the normal number of issuances in a season. NOAA’s National Weather Service (NWS) Forecast Office (WFO) in Amarillo’s staff was proactive in support of emergency decision makers, and fire warnings were issued for evacuation of citizens. The office website was quickly updated with the latest information on the wildfires.




  • What were the results of the actions in either quantifiable or qualitative terms?

Local emergency managers spoke highly of the NWS in regards to the devastating wildfires. Mr. Ken Daughtry, Wheeler County TX Emergency Management (EM) said, "The process worked great for us. We were able to notify the NWS …within minutes the Fire Warning and evacuation order were broadcast. Nearly everyone received the information and evacuated from Mobeetie and Wheeler." Similar comments were received from Vernon Cook, Roberts County, TX Judge when fire threatened the community of Miami. "It was crazy around here. The Sheriff was in charge of notifying the citizens of Miami. He was able to easily get the Fire Warning and evacuation orders for Miami broadcast through the Emergency Alert System (EAS) by contacting the Amarillo NWS." State Department of Emergency Management (DEM) and TX Department of Transportation (TXDOT) officials were also very grateful for the support they received during the events. David Solis, DEM Regional Liaison Officer (RLO), personally called and sent a thank you card to the staff. In his card, Mr. Solis specifically mentioned the "great information we got during the conference calls."


Section 3 - Additional Information:


  • How long did it take to complete the accomplishment? When was the accomplishment completed/implemented/deployed?

A workshop had just been conducted on February 27, 2006 at WFO AMA to inform emergency managers and county officials of the new Non-Weather Emergency Message (NWEM) codes and the procedures necessary to request Emergency Alert System (EAS) activation on NOAA Weather Radio (NWR). Also, a fire weather customer meeting was held during the week of the March 12 event and customers were briefed on the outlook for continued dry conditions through the spring and early summer. They were alerted to the increased wildfire potential for March 12. These meetings set the stage for services which were provided through March and April of 2006.




  • What is the short-term impact (1-2 years) of the accomplishment on the bureau and/or Department=s mission?

WFO Amarillo staff implemented a customer based support for wildfire operations for this event. The methods and actions utilized for this event serve as a model for the future concept of operations currently considered by the NWS.




  • What is the long-term impact (3-5 years) of the accomplishment on the bureau and/or Department=s mission?

WFO Amarillo’s leadership in providing firsthand customer support and tailored forecasts for the Texas panhandle wildfires proves the viability of a long term vision of future WFOs which are geared to supporting emergency decision makers during high impact weather and non-weather events.




  • Does the accomplishment affect other bureaus/Department or other Federal agencies? If so, how?

Yes, the National Park Service as well as numerous state agencies such as the Texas Forest Service, Texas DEM and TXDOT.




  • Did the accomplishment result in a major advancement in science, technology, or automation? If so, how?

Yes. Lessons learned from this event will be documented for future events.




  • Did the accomplishment result in a major advancement in non-scientific areas such as customer service or administrative support? If so, how?

For several outbreaks, WFO AMA staff was directly dispatched to the incident command centers of the TXDOT and to the Hutchinson County EOC to provide on-site weather briefings. One of the most important services provided to emergency managers and county judges was the transmission of Fire Warning evacuation messages for several communities. Services provided were specific and tactical to ongoing fires in contrast to the strategic statewide weather support provided by NWS meteorologists at the State command center in Grandbury, TX, some 300 miles to the southeast.


WFO Anchorage

Alaska Aviation Weather Unit

Center Weather Service Unit

NWS

Nomination #68
NOAA/NWS WFO Anchorage, AAWU/VAAC, CWSU

1. Type of Award: Bronze
2. Nomination Type: Joint Organization
3. Nomination Category: Customer Service
4. Names of Nominees: Weather Forecast Office Anchorage, Alaska Aviation Weather Unit, Center Weather Service Unit
Complete office addresses:
NOAA/NWS Weather Forecast Office Anchorage

6930 Sand Lake Road

Anchorage, AK 99502-1845
NOAA/NWS Alaska Aviation Weather Unit / Anchorage Volcanic Ash Advisory Center

6930 Sand Lake Road


Anchorage, AK 99502-1845
NOAA/NWS Anchorage Center Weather Service Unit

700 North Boniface Parkway


Anchorage, AK 99506
5. Other National Weather Service Awards: N/A
6. Current Performance Rating: N/A
7. Nominator's Name, Title, complete office address, and phone number:

Laura Furgione, Director

NOAA/National Weather Service Alaska Region Headquarters
222 West 7th Ave, #23
Anchorage, AK 99513-7575

Telephone: (907) 271-5136


What is the significance of this accomplishment?
The team's dedication provided accurate and timely information to emergency managers, other agencies and the general public, preventing volcanic ash damage to lives and property.
I. Certificate Text:
For selfless dedication and outstanding customer service during the prolonged eruptions of Augustine Volcano during the 2005-2006 winter season.
III. Justification:
Section 1 - Definitions:
AAWU - Alaska Aviation Weather Unit

ARH - Alaska Region Headquarters of NWS

AVO - Alaska Volcano Observatory, a joint program of the USGS, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the State of Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys

CWSU - Center Weather Service Unit

DEC - Department of Environmental Conservation, State of Alaska

DHS&EM - Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management

DNR - Department of Natural Resources, State of Alaska

DOC – Department of Commerce

FAA - Federal Aviation Administration

HHS - Health and Human Services, State of Alaska

NOAA – National Weather Service

NWS – NOAA’s National Weather Service

Mt. - Mount

SIGMET - Significant Meteorological Advisory, the primary warning product to the aviation community of the hazard of volcanic ash

USCG - United States Coast Guard

USGS - United States Geological Survey

VAAC - Volcanic Ash Advisory Center. The AAWU serves as one of nine worldwide VAACs.

WFO – NOAA/NWS Weather Forecast Office



WC/ATWC - West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center
Section 2 - Award Justification:
What was the specific goal, challenge or problem related to the Department's mission/or Strategic Plan?
The team's efforts directly support DOC Goal 1: Provide the information and tools to maximize U.S. competitiveness and enable economic growth for American industries, workers and consumers, and Goal 3: Observe, protect and manage the Earth's resources to promote environmental stewardship.
What was the context in which the nominee addressed the goal, challenge, or problem?
Mt. Augustine volcano poses a very high threat to human health and safety because of its proximity to Anchorage and its busy ports and airways. Most of the air cargo between eastern Asia and North America passes over Alaska's volcanoes daily. The potential economic impact of volcanic ash to the aviation industry is measured in millions of dollars in terms of potential engine damage, diverted routes and airport closures. Ash causes respiratory illnesses and various other threats to safety and the economy.
What specific actions did the nominee take to address the goal, challenge or problem?
The team held news briefings and numerous teleconferences to coordinate accurate and timely public information. The AAWU issued SIGMETS whenever volcanic ash was suspended in the atmosphere, and cancelled them once the hazard terminated. The CWSU advised the FAA air traffic control center, disseminated pilot reports, and produced meteorological impact statements. The VAAC issued volcanic ash advisories every six hours for as long as ash eruptions were expected or confirmed. WFO Anchorage coordinated with the VAAC on the tracking of volcanic ash clouds and issued public and marine products. The team refined procedures learned from this prolonged series of events.
What were the results of the actions in either quantifiable or qualitative terms?
The team’s collaborations created consistent, accurate and timely messages to the public before and during the extended eruptions of Augustine Volcano. Since this was the first major volcanic event to seriously threaten Alaska's most populated area since 1992; the team's outstanding performance indicates that strong partnerships that have been fostered among the various participants through other interactions. Their ability to keep air traffic flowing safely into/out of Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport, the world’s fourth busiest cargo airport, saved millions of dollars in possible lost revenue. The Lead Dispatcher for Alaska Airlines said that because of the direct support from the AAWU they “…were able to keep flights flowing in and out of the airport”, and that “many flying (go/no go) decisions were not made until after consultation with the AAWU”.
Section 3 - Additional Information:
How long did it take to complete the accomplishment? When was the accomplishment completed/implemented/deployed?
Preparations began in late November 2005, a news briefing was held in late December, and the volcano's first eruption occurred January 11, 2006. A four week state of continuous eruption began on January 28, and the volcano continued minor eruptions and steam clouds until its activity slowed to low levels in mid-April, 2006.
What is the short-term impact (1-2 years) of the accomplishment on the bureau and/or Department's mission?
The team's exceptional collaboration provided the public with timely and accurate warnings, and "set the stage" for future events. Results indicate the team's advanced preparation protected lives and property.
What is the long-term impact (3-5 years) of the accomplishment on the bureau and/or Department's mission?
The team's efforts created a spirit of cooperation between local, state and federal partners chartered with volcanic disaster emergency preparedness.
Does the accomplishment affect other bureaus/Department or other Federal agencies? If so, how?
Other agencies including DEC, DHS&EM, DNR, HHS, FAA, USCG, USGS, Municipality of Anchorage, and Kenai Peninsula Borough are key players in this process because of their missions of protecting lives, property and the environment.
Did the accomplishment result in a major advancement in science, technology, or automation? If so, how?
The team tested the Volcanic Ash Collaboration Tool operationally at the CWSU, AVO, and AAWU/VAAC. This revolutionary tool provided an experimental solution to the long-standing problem of volcanic ash forecasting and facilitated team decision making during emergency situations. In addition, WFO Anchorage created a coordinated website providing links to information from various agencies (http://www.volcano.gov).
Did the accomplishment result in a major advancement in non-scientific areas such as customer service or administrative support? If so, how?
The team’s efforts resulted in a highly successful collaborative customer service process between federal, state and local agencies. The team held a multi-agency news briefing in which scientists from the WC/ATWC, ARH and the AVO informed the media on volcanic dangers. During the eruptions, the team held numerous multi-agency teleconferences to coordinate consistent, timely public warnings. The team of NWS employees from the CWSU, AAWU, and WFO Anchorage were key participants, responsible for issuing public volcanic ash products. Also, employees from DEC, DHS&EM, DNR, HHS, FAA, USGS, and local municipalities and boroughs participated in these meetings to ensure accurate and timely public information.
WFO Binghamton, New York—Flooding Event

NWS

Nomination #69
1. Type of Award: Bronze
2. Nomination Type: Organizational
3. Nomination Category: Customer Service
4. Name of Nominee: NOAA/NWS Binghamton, NY

Accepting the Award: Barbara Watson, Meteorologist-in-Charge



Salutation: Ms.

Pronunciation: what-son
Complete office address: National Weather Service Office, NOAA

WFO Binghamton

Binghamton Regional Airport

32 Dawes Drive

Johnson City, NY 13790
5. Other National Weather Service Awards: Bronze Medal - Dec 2005

Bronze Medal - Dec 2004

Bronze Medal - Dec 1999

Gold Medal - Dec 1996


6. Current Performance Rating: N/A
7. Nominator’s Name, Title, Office Address, Phone Number:

Mickey Brown, Deputy Director

NWS Eastern Region

630 Johnson Avenue

Bohemia, NY 11716

Telephone: (631) 244-0102


What is the significance of this accomplishment?
Accurate and timely warnings saved many lives and reduced economic losses during the severe flooding of April 2-4, 2005, in the upper Susquehanna and Delaware River Basins.
I. Certificate Text:
For exemplary customer service enabling public officials and citizens to take necessary life-saving actions during the severe flooding of April 2005.
II. Program Text:
III. Justification:
Section 1 - Definitions:
EM Emergency Manager

ESD Emergency Services Director

NWS National Weather Service

WFO NWS Weather Forecast Office


Section 2 - Award Justification:


  • What was the specific goal, challenge or problem related to the Department=s mission/or Strategic Plan?

Society’s need for weather and water information. From April 2-4, 2005, heavy rain and snowmelt combined to produce a major flood in the Susquehanna and Delaware River Basins. The Susquehanna at Binghamton, NY produced its worse flooding in 70 years. A record high crest was recorded at Beaver Kill, NY along the Delaware. For much of the Delaware River, it was the second major flood in 6 months and rivaled the historic flood of 1955. The challenge for WFO Binghamton was to accurately predict the amount of water from snowmelt and rain running into the rivers so timely and accurate flood warnings could be issued.




  • What was the context in which the nominee addressed the goal, challenge, or problem?

Binghamton was able to provide river forecasts and flood warnings with nearly 48 hours lead time by combining the rainfall and snow melt estimates. This is a difficult forecast to make due to the many individual weather components needed to make an accurate forecast. The office monitored the condition of the snow pack, river conditions, and coordinated the potential flood threat, weeks before flooding occurred.




  • What specific actions did the nominee take to address the goal, challenge or problem?

Binghamton alerted customers to the threat 5 days before flooding occurred. Flood watches, further heightening awareness, were issued 3 days in advance. Flood warnings, stating major flooding would occur, were issued with nearly 48 hours lead time. Conference calls were held 3 days before flooding occurred with Emergency Managers (EMs) to discuss the potential for record flooding. Binghamton had conducted flood awareness education months before the April floods, directly leading to an increased response, saved lives, and mitigation of damage.




  • What were the results of the actions in either quantifiable or qualitative terms?

With 48 hours notice major flooding would occur in Binghamton, the Broome County Emergency Services Director (ESD) ordered a 6 foot protective earthen berm built around Lourdes Hospital. A forecasted crest of 21’ would have inundated the hospital, requiring a complete evacuation and millions of dollars in damage. The river crested at 20.7’, but the berm kept the river out of the hospital, eliminating the need for evacuations and saving the hospital from damage.


Section 3 - Additional Information:


  • How long did it take to complete the accomplishment? When was the accomplishment completed/implemented/deployed?

Five days for information on the flooding. Many years of extensive outreach sensitizing the public to the impacts from floods and assisting emergency planners develop action plans.




  • What is the short-term impact (1-2 years) of the accomplishment on the bureau and/or Department’s mission?

Lives were saved and damage was minimized. The Broome County ESD stated, “If it weren’t for NWS’s river forecasts and close coordination with hospital officials, Lourdes Hospital would have been closed.” The Pike County, PA EM stated, “Early warning from the conference calls allowed EMs to spread the word that this would be worse than (Tropical Storm) Ivan, so people prepared.” The calls helped frame the event in many EMs’ minds and empowered them to take decisive actions. The Sullivan County, NY, EM stated NWS forecasts were “excellent” and the conference calls were “exceptional.” The Delaware County EM stated, “Excellent job! Early warning saved lives and helped people prepare and save what property they could.”




  • What is the long-term impact (3-5 years) of the accomplishment on the bureau and/or Department’s mission?

Creditability and trust in Commerce and cultivation of extremely positive customer relationships.




  • Does the accomplishment affect other bureaus/Department or other Federal agencies? If so, how?

Briefings for emergency management, U.S. Geological Survey, Susquehanna River Basin Commission, and Delaware River Basin Commission, and others were conducted. Excellent interagency coordination resulted in superb mitigation planning and allocation of state and Federal resources. Pennsylvania Governor, Edward G. Rendell, wrote a letter to President Bush stating, “National Weather Service personnel…were instrumental in helping to keep our county emergency managers prepared for the rising waters.”




  • Did the accomplishment result in a major advancement in science, technology, or automation? If so, how?

Techniques used to quantity snowmelt runoff were validated.




  • Did the accomplishment result in a major advancement in non-scientific areas such as customer service or administrative support? If so, how?

Major achievement in customer service. Months before the floods, Binghamton assisted in flood mitigation education at a workshop sponsored by local EMs. In attendance were executives from Lourdes Hospital and Broome County. These executives developed an action plan based on what they learned at the workshop. The action plan was executed during the April floods and saved the hospital.


WFO Binghamton, NY – Wind Event

NWS

Nomination #70
1. Type of Award: Bronze
2. Nomination Type: Organizational
3. Nomination Category: Customer Service
4. Name of Nominee: NOAA/NWS WFO Binghamton, NY

Accepting the Award: Barbara Watson, Meteorologist-in-Charge

Salutation: Mrs.

Pronunciation: what-son
Complete office address: National Weather Service Office, NOAA

Binghamton Greater Regional Airport

32 Dawes Road

Johnson City, NY 13790




  1. Other National Weather Service Awards: Bronze Medal - Dec 2005

Bronze Medal - Dec 2004

Bronze Medal - Dec 1999


6. Current Performance Rating: N/A
7. Nominator’s Name, Title, Office Address, Phone Number:

Mickey Brown, Deputy Director

NWS Eastern Region

630 Johnson Avenue

Bohemia, NY 11716

Telephone: (631) 244-0102


What is the significance of this accomplishment?
Accurate and timely warnings for a severe thunderstorm and continuing community safety and preparedness outreach saved lives when a storm blew the roof off an elementary school in Endicott, NY.
I. Certificate Text:
For exemplary customer service enabling school officials to take life-saving actions from damaging winds caused by a severe thunderstorm on June 2005.
III. Justification:
Section 1 - Definitions:
FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency

NOAA National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

NWR NOAA Weather Radio, All Hazards

NWS National Weather Service

WFO NWS Weather Forecast Office

VADM Vice Admiral


Section 2 - Award Justification:


  • What was the specific goal, challenge or problem related to the Department’s mission/or Strategic Plan?

Department of Commerce Strategic Goal 3.1 - Society’s needs for weather and water information. Damaging winds from severe thunderstorms pose a significant threat to citizens of central New York. These storms do not develop classic weather radar characteristics of storms that produce large tornadoes. Therefore, these storms are harder to identify and warn for. Such was the case on June 6, 2005, when strong winds from a severe thunderstorm tore the roof off the Endicott, NY elementary school.



1   ...   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26




The database is protected by copyright ©ininet.org 2020
send message

    Main page