Our Landmarks



Download 420.08 Kb.
Page1/6
Date31.01.2017
Size420.08 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6
(This will be displayed in a giant cherry wood glass frame with photos and the information below)



 Our Landmarks

John F. Kennedy International Airport is a major international airport located in the borough of Queens in New York City, United States, 12 miles (20 km) southeast of Lower Manhattan. It is the busiest international air passenger gateway into the United States, the fifth busiest airport in the United States and the busiest airport in the New York City airport system, handling 56,827,154 passengers in 2015. Over ninety airlines operate out of the airport, with non-stop or direct flights to destinations in all six inhabited continents. The airport features six passenger terminals and four runways. It serves as a hub for American Airlines and Delta Air Lines and is the primary operating base for JetBlue Airways. In the past, JFK served as a hub for EasternNationalPan Am, and TWA.



Opened as New York International Airport in 1948, it was commonly known as Idlewild Airport before being renamed in 1963 in memory of John F. Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States, following his assassination.



AirTrain JFK is a 3-line, 8.1-mile-long (13 km) people mover system and elevated railway in New York City providing a 24/7 service to John F. Kennedy International Airport. It is operated by Bombardier Transportation under contract to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the operator of the airport. The service operates all day, year-round. The system finally opened on December 17, 2003.



There are precious few memorials to St. Albans/Addisleigh Park’s jazz heritage. In 1899, a year after Queens became part of New York City (and with the Town of Jamaica and the Village of Jamaica thereby dissolved), the new post office for the 600 residents was named St. Albans, after St Albans in Hertfordshire, England, which itself was named after a Saint Alban, thought to be the first Christian martyred in England. The name had been in use for the area since at least 1894 for the name of the school district. There already was a road in the area called St. Albans Avenue, and the LIRR station was named St. Albans when it opened in 1898.

The St. Albans Golf Course, built in 1915, brought rich and famous golfers, including baseball star Babe Ruth. The Depression forced the golf course owners to try to sell, but plans for private development fell through. The federal government in 1942 seized the land, and construction soon began on the St. Albans Naval Hospital, which opened in 1943. The Veterans Administration received the St. Albans Extended Care Center, now known as the VA St. Albans Community Living Center, from the U.S. Navy on March 14, 1974.

The VA St. Albans Community Living Center provides primary care and offers specialized geriatric programs and restorative rehabilitation. Geriatric programs provide comprehensive evaluation and safe, effective management of elderly cognitively impaired veterans. An outpatient Adult Day Health Care Program and Home Based Primary Care Program exists and cares for physically disabled, medically-complicated elderly veterans who are at risk of nursing home placement or recurrent hospitalization. A comprehensive psychosocial rehabilitation Domiciliary program, providing incentive therapy, vocational counseling and independent living skills training for patients seeking to return to independent living, is provided at the VA St. Albans Community Living Center.



Many famous jazz musicians used to live in St. Albans, particularly in some of the large houses in the small western enclave known as Addisleigh Park. 



Southern Queens’ ascendance as a mecca for jazz musicians began in 1923 when Clarence Williams, a successful musician and entrepreneur from Plaquemine, Louisiana, purchased a home and eight lots at 171-37 108th Avenue.
Home of Web Dubois 173-19 113th Ave

Dressed in a tuxedo, civil-rights leader W.E.B. Du Bois married an activist nearly three decades his junior on Feb. 27, 1951, in a posh house in southeast Queens. The exterior of the Addisleigh Park, or to many St. Albans, home where Du Bois, 83, wed Shirley Graham, 54, is remarkably unchanged from what the couple's friends would recall. But it also remains unlandmarked at a time when a building boom is sweeping across the borough.




William James "CountBasie (August 21, 1904 – April 26, 1984)[1] was an American jazz pianist, organist, bandleader, and composer. His mother taught him to play the piano and he started performing in his teens. Dropping out of school, he learned to operate lights for vaudeville and to improvise accompaniment for silent films at a local movie theater in his home town of Red Bank, New Jersey. By 16 years old, he increasingly played jazz piano at parties, resorts and other venues.

In 1935, Basie formed his own jazz orchestra, the Count Basie Orchestra, and in 1936 took them to Chicago for a long engagement and their first recording. He led the group for almost 50 years, creating innovations like the use of two "split" tenor saxophones, emphasizing the rhythm section, riffing with a big band, using arrangers to broaden their sound, and others. Many musicians came to prominence under his direction, including the tenor saxophonists Lester Young and Herschel Evans, the guitarist Freddie Green, trumpeters Buck Clayton and Harry "Sweets" Edison and singers Jimmy Rushing and Joe Williams. Basie's theme songs were "One O'Clock Jump", developed in 1935 in the early days of his band, and later "April in Paris". William Basie was born to Harvey Lee and Lillian Basie in Red Bank, New Jersey. His father worked as a coachman and caretaker for a wealthy judge. After automobiles replaced horses, his father became a groundskeeper and handyman for several wealthy families in the area. Both of his parents had some type of musical background. His father played the mellophone, and his mother played the piano; in fact, she gave Basie his first piano lessons. She took in laundry and baked cakes for sale for a living. She paid 25 cents a lesson for piano instruction for him.



Basie was a member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity. On 21 July 1930, Basie married Vivian Lee Winn, in Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri. They were divorced sometime before 1935. Sometime in or before 1935, the now single Basie returned to New York City, renting a house at 111 West 138th Street, Manhattan, as evidenced by the 1940 census. He married Catherine Morgan on 13 July 1940 in the King County courthouse in Seattle, Washington. In 1942, they moved to Queens. The Basie's bought a whites-only home in the new neighborhood of Addisleigh Park in 1946 on Adelaide Road and 175th Street, St. Albans. On April 11, 1983, Catherine Basie died of a heart attack at the couple's home in Freeport, Grand Bahama Island. She was 67 years old. Basie died of pancreatic cancer in Hollywood, Florida on April 26, 1984 at the age of 79.

Count Basie’s home on Adelaide Road and 175th Street, St. Albans

Ella Fitzgerald performed for 58 years, won 13 Grammy Awards and sold in excess of 40 million records. “The First Lady of Song” was born in Newport News, VA, and was orphaned young in life. She was discovered in an amateur contest sponsored by Harlem’s famed Apollo Theatre in 1934 and was soon the featured vocalist in Chick Webb‘s band.



Ella lived on Murdock Avenue between 179th and 180th Street. She moved to Addisleigh Park in the 1950s.



Milt Hinton, The dean of jazz bassists, “The Judge” was born in Vicksburg, Mississippi and moved to Chicago with his family in 1921. After working through the 1920s a s afreelance musician with such legendary jazz artists including Zutty Singleton, Jabbo Smith, Eddie South, Erskine Tate, and Art Tatum, he joined Cab Calloway‘s band in 1936, remaining with Cab for 15 years. Milt Hinton was also an educator and author, teaching at Hunter and Baruch Colleges.



Milt Hinton lived in this house at 113th Avenue and Marne Place. Hinton was a Queens resident from 1950 until his death in 2000.



Lena Horne was born in Brooklyn in 1917 and has been performing since she was a teenager. She danced and later sung at the Cotton Club beginning in 1933 and made her first recordings in 1937 with Teddy Wilson’s orchestra. She joined Charlie Barnet‘s orchestra in 1940, and while Barnet’s behavior was exemplary (he was one of the first white bandleaders to hire African Americans) she tired of the draining segregation and racism that was such a constant durng that time. Upon signing with MGM in 1940, she shrewdly had a clause written in that prevented her from depicting domestics, in a jungle native role, or other cliché images. Her appearance in 1943’sStormy Weather was a sensation; her rendition of the title song was her biggest hit and remains her signature song. Lena Horne left Hollywood in the early fifties to concentrate on her singing.



178th Street between 112th Avenue and Murdock Avenue. Like many of her contemporaries, Lena Horne resided here beginning in the 1940s.



James Joseph Brown (May 3, 1933 – December 25, 2006) was an American singer, songwriter, record producer, dancer and bandleader. The founding father of funk music and a major figure of 20th century popular music and dance, he is often referred to as the "Godfather of Soul". In a career that spanned six decades, he influenced the development of several music genres.

Brown began his career as a gospel singer in Toccoa, Georgia. He joined an R&B vocal group, the Gospel Starlighters (which later evolved into the Flames), in which he was the lead singer. First coming to national public attention in the late 1950s as a member of the singing group The Famous Flames with the hit ballads "Please, Please, Please" and "Try Me", Brown built a reputation as a tireless live performer with the Famous Flames and his backing band, sometimes known as the James Brown Band or the James Brown Orchestra. His success peaked in the 1960s with the live album Live at the Apollo and hit singles such as "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag", "I Got You (I Feel Good)" and "It's a Man's Man's Man's World". During the late 1960s he moved from a continuum of blues and gospel-based forms and styles to a profoundly "Africanized" approach to music-making that influenced the development of funk music. By the early 1970s, Brown had fully established the funk sound after the formation of the J.B.s with records such as "Get Up (I Feel Like Being a) Sex Machine" and "The Payback". He also became noted for songs of social commentary, including the 1968 hit "Say It Loud – I'm Black and I'm Proud". Brown continued to perform and record until his death from congestive heart failurein 2006.





The Godfather of Soul, James Brown, lived in this house which formerly belonged to Bart Williams, trumpeter with Duke Ellington, on Linden Boulevard and 176th Street.

Jack Roosevelt "Jackie" Robinson (January 31, 1919 – October 24, 1972) was an American professional baseball second baseman who became the first African American to play in Major League Baseball (MLB) in the modern era. Robinson broke the baseball color line when the Brooklyn Dodgers started him at first base on April 15, 1947. The Dodgers, by signing Robinson, heralded the end of racial segregation in professional baseball that had relegated black players to the Negro leagues since the 1880s. Robinson was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962.

Jackie Robinson House was a Brooklyn home of baseball great Jackie Robinson from 1947 when he was awarded Rookie of the Year with the Brooklyn Dodgers through 1949 when he was voted Most Valuable Player. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1976. 



However, his other house at 112-40 177th Street in the Addisleigh Park neighborhood of Queens, was the Robinsons' home from 1949 to 1955 is not currently landmarked.




Download 420.08 Kb.

Share with your friends:
  1   2   3   4   5   6




The database is protected by copyright ©ininet.org 2020
send message

    Main page