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Link—Spending Climate = T/Off – Public



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Link—Spending Climate = T/Off – Public


Public against spending
Sargent 6/22 (Greg, staff, Washington Post, http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/plum-line/post/dems-lost-argument-over-deficit-and-spending-because-they-never-engaged-it/2011/03/03/AG7q7ufH_blog.html, accessed 6-29-11, CH)

In case you need further evidence that the Dem decision to effectively endorse the right’s austerity/cut-cut-cut frame is only harming themselves, check out the internals of the new Bloomberg News poll. They show that the public broadly agrees with Republican arguments about the deficit, spending cuts and what it takes to rebuild the “confidence” required for an economic rebound. The key numbers: * Fifty-five percent of Americans think that spending cuts and tax cuts will give businesses more confidence to hire. Only 17 percent think government should spend more to stimulate the economy, and only another 17 percent think we should maintain current spending levels. * Sixty-five percent say that a major reason for the economy remaining in the toilet is because the large federal deficit makes the economy “unstable.” * Fifty-two percent think a major reason for our economic doldrums is that “uncertainty” created by government regulations and taxes is harming hiring. * Only 35 percent think a major reason for the economic doldrums is that spending cuts hurts jobs. In other words, the public broadly believes in what Paul Krugman refers to as the “confidence fairy,” i.e., the notion that deficit cutting is an important component in restoring “economic confidence,” a notion that even the White House has endorsed. It also agrees with the GOP’s argument that excessive regulation and taxes create “uncertainty.”


Public key—Democrats know elections depend on economic policy
Duclos 11 (Susan, Editor, Wake Up America Blog, 6/30, http://wwwwakeupamericans-spree.blogspot.com/2011/04/democrats-join-republicans-insisting-on.html, accessed 6/30/11, CH

In 2012, 23 Democratic Senate seats are in play and 10 Republican Senate seats, so decisions made now will be watched and judged and will undoubtedly be a factor in how constituents vote in those elections. Resurgent Republic: President Obama’s policy of raising the federal debt limit without any preconditions relating to limiting spending, i.e. a "clean debt limit," is supported by only one-out-of-ten voters, the least popular option of three presented in a Resurgent Republic survey conducted jointly with the American Action Forum. The second-ranking option overall is "not raising the debt limit under any circumstances." That option places second among Independents and Democrats, and is the top preference for Republicans. The preferred option, drawing support from a plurality of voters overall, is "raising the debt limit, but only in exchange for substantial spending cuts and a commitment to reduce the deficit." The days of "routine" debt limit increase votes may be history, with voters holding firm views about the debt ceiling vote in a time of concern over the economy and a pervasive view that "we have got to stop spending money we don’t have," as has been seen in previous Resurgent Republic polling. The Democrats listed above understand the Republicans in Congress enjoy an overwhelming amount of public support to lower the deficit, cut spending and get our fiscal house in order. They understand this because their chances at being reelected depend on it
Public against spending—polls
Elkins 11 (Polling Director, Reason.com, 5/6, http://reason.com/poll/2011/05/06/public-opinion-debt, accessed 6-29-11, CH)

In terms of strategy to reduce the debt, the Reason-Rupe poll shows a clear majority (74%) of Americans favor a government-spending cap. This does not directly address reducing the debt, but it does mean slowing its rate of growth. Republicans (84%) and Independents (81%) are significantly more likely to want a spending cap than Democrats (64%), though a strong majority of all favored the limit. (The opposition to a spending cap may be the result of a preference for using increased government spending during a recession in efforts to stimulate the economy. A spending cap would make this difficult.)


Public against spending—polls
Elkins 11 (Polling Director, Reason.com, 5/6, http://reason.com/poll/2011/05/06/public-opinion-debt, accessed 6-29-11, CH)

When given the trade-off between reducing spending and raising taxes, the largest response (45%) was to reduce spending while maintaining current taxation levels. Another 16% of respondents wanted to primarily reduce spending along with some increase in taxes, bringing the total of those wanting to focus on lowering spending to 61%. Of the remaining respondents, 14% wanted equal emphasis on both increasing taxes and reducing spending, 8% wanted to primarily increase taxes with some reduction in spending, 4% wanted to increase taxes while maintaining current spending, and 11% said they did not have an opinion.

Link—Spending Climate = T/Off – Public


Public calls for more cuts—Congress will support to gain electoral advantage
Page 11 (Susan, staff, USA Today, 2/24, http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2011-02-24-budgetpoll24_ST_N.htm, accessed 6-30-11, CH)

Yet there is wide public support for spending cuts that go beyond those President Obama is proposing, a finding that could embolden Republicans as the deadline to extend funding for the government approaches. Although 25% of those surveyed say Republican-proposed cuts go too far, twice as many say that Obama's cuts don't go far enough. In fact, nearly one in four say even the deeper GOP cuts aren't sufficient. Both parties are jockeying for advantage on the issue, an early test for the fiscally conservative Tea Party forces that helped the GOP win control of the House of Representatives in midterm voting. White House spokesman Jay Carney and House Speaker John Boehner insist they want to avoid a shutdown, but each side accuses the other of refusing to negotiate in good faith.


Republicans committed to spending cuts—public calls mean best political option

Cole 11(Tom, Congressman, 1/25, http://cole.house.gov/news/press-releases/2011/01/cole-comments-on-state-of-the-union-address-1.shtml, accessed 6-30-11, CH)

"For the first time in four years, we have an opportunity to make real progress in reducing the deficit before it's too late. Public support for spending cuts has reached the highest levels in recent memory, and that determination is shared by the Republican majority in the House. "With both the debt and the public appetite for spending cuts reaching historic highs, deficit reduction has rapidly become not only the smart option politically but the only option fiscally. If President Obama offers a legitimate deficit reduction plan, he will certainly find allies in the American people and the Republican House.






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