Training development in support of the operational domain


-5. Develop the performance steps



Download 1.39 Mb.
Page12/36
Date18.10.2016
Size1.39 Mb.
1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   ...   36

5-5. Develop the performance steps


Performance steps are the major actions a unit must accomplish to perform a collective task to standard. Performance steps provide a (typically sequential) step-by-step description of the discrete actions that compose a task. Performance steps are sequentially numbered in accordance with the CAC-approved automated development system. Performance steps are written using a subject, present tense verb, and object format. The subject may be omitted if assumed or implied. When developing performance steps, the use of terms and specific equipment must be appropriate to the entire target population. Any step within each T&EO that the training developer determines is a leader task (conducted by a leader or leaders) is identified by marking it with an asterisk (*). If the unit fails to correctly perform one of these identified steps to standard, it has failed to achieve the overall task standard.
a. A performance step sentence should include a description of the present tense action, and a quantitative or qualitative remark. Performance steps are written in present tense just like a set of instructions. The Soldier has not yet performed the step, and is reading it in the context of "do this now."
b. Use notes only when necessary to provide caveats that may clarify minor differences between units or proponents. Before adding a note to a performance step, assess the applicability of adding the information to an existing performance step or as an additional performance step.
c. Individual tasks must be linked to a collective task rather than integrated as performance steps in a collective task. For example, the collective task Perform Route Reconnaissance is trained through an individual task such as Write an Operations Order, or Plan a Route Reconnaissance.
d. Supporting collective tasks must be linked to a collective task rather than integrated as performance steps in a collective task.

e. Table 5-1 is an example of a partial list of performance steps and sub-steps from a collective task.





Table 5-1
Performance steps


Performance Steps

3. The unit begins necessary movement in time to make all required timelines indicated in the OPORD.

* 4. The unit leaders conduct a leader's reconnaissance.

a. Pinpoint the objective.

b. Establish security at the objective.

c. Determine the enemy's size, location, disposition, and most probable course of action on the objective.

d. Determine where the enemy is most vulnerable to attack and where the support element can best place fires on the objective.

e. Verify and update intelligence information.

f. Determine whether to conduct the assault mounted or dismounted, if applicable.

g. Select security, support, and assault positions.

h. Leave a surveillance team to observe the objective.

i. Return to the unit position.

* 5. The unit leader adjusts the plan based on updated intelligence and reconnaissance effort.




Table 5-1
Performance steps, continued


Performance Steps

* 6. The unit leader issues the OPORD and uses FRAGOs as necessary to redirect actions of subordinate elements.

7. The unit prepares for attack.

8. The unit issues FRAGOs as necessary to address changes to the plan identified during the rehearsal.

9. The unit executes the attack.



5-6. Develop the performance measures


Performance measures are actions that are objectively observable, qualitative and quantitative to the extent possible, and that can be used to determine if a performance step or sub-step is satisfactorily achieved. Performance measures are sequentially numbered in accordance with the CAC-approved automated development system. Performance measures are written using a subject, past tense verb, and object format. The performance measures are past tense since the evaluator is concerned with determining if the step or steps comprising the measure were actually performed. The subject may be omitted if assumed or implied. When developing performance measures for a collective task, ensure they are constructed using terms and equipment names that are not too restrictive or too specific for the units and proponents that train the task. Before adding a note to a performance measure, assess the applicability of adding the information to an existing performance measure or as an additional performance measure. Performance measures for collective tasks include GO/NO GO/NA columns for the evaluator. If the measure does not apply at a particular echelon or is not observed during training of a particular unit, the evaluator can designate this in the NA column so as not to affect the GO/NO GO status of the unit. Adding the NA column also allows the developer to write the task to the highest applicable echelon knowing that some steps or substeps do not apply at the lower echelons. Table 5-2 is an example of a partial list of performance measures from a collective task.

Table 5-2
Performance measures


Performance measures

GO

NO GO

NA

3. The unit movement began in time to meet the required timelines indicated in the OPORD.










*4. Reconnaissance conducted by unit leaders.










a. Pinpointed the objective.










b. Established security at the objective.










c. Determined the enemy's size, location, disposition, and most probable course of action on the objective.










d. Determined the enemy’s vulnerability and where the support element could best place fires on the objective.










e. Intelligence information was verified and updated.










f. Determined whether to conduct the assault mounted or dismounted, as applicable.










g. Selected security, support, and assault positions.










h. Left a surveillance team to observe the objective.










i. Returned to the unit position.










*5. The unit leader adjusted the plan based on updated intelligence and reconnaissance effort.










*6. The unit leader issued the OPORD and used FRAGOs as necessary to redirect actions of subordinate elements.










7. The unit prepared for attack.










8. The unit issued FRAGOs as necessary to address changes to the plan identified during the rehearsal.










9. The unit executed the attack.














Download 1.39 Mb.

Share with your friends:
1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   ...   36




The database is protected by copyright ©ininet.org 2020
send message

    Main page