Training development in support of the operational domain


-7. Identify the supporting individual tasks



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5-7. Identify the supporting individual tasks


Supporting individual tasks are performed to enable the successful performance of the supported collective task. The supporting individual tasks are the individual tasks that must be preformed to accomplish the collective task. Proficiency must occur at the individual task level before it can occur at the collective task level. Therefore, when developing a collective task, the developer works with a SME to identify and link individual tasks that support that collective task. Each collective task should have one or more individual tasks linked to it in the CAC-approved automated development system. For example, the company-level task Conduct an Attack requires Soldiers to Engage a Target with an M16 Series Rifle. This is an individual task that is performed during the actual execution or is a direct prerequisite to the performance of the supported collective task. Supporting individual tasks must be applicable to all or the majority of the target population. This guidance is applicable at both the task and performance step level. An example appears in figure 5-6.

F
igure 5-6. Listing supporting individual and collective tasks



5-8. Identify the supporting collective tasks

a. Supporting collective tasks are those tasks that enable the successful performance of the supported collective task. The inclusion of supporting collective tasks must be limited to tasks that have a first order effect on the supported collective task. Supporting collective tasks must be applicable to all or the majority of the target population. Supporting collective tasks are identified for both the task and performance step levels when applicable, and are linked to the collective task rather than just being listed as performance steps.


b. Proficiency must occur at the supporting collective task level before it can occur at the collective task level. Therefore, when developing a collective task, the supporting collective tasks must be identified and linked. A direct prerequisite collective task must be applicable to the majority of the population. This guidance applies at both the task and performance step levels. A list of supporting individual and collective tasks is illustrated in figure 5-6.

5-9. Identify the supporting drills


Supporting drills are those that are performed during the execution of the supported collective task. Drills must be applicable to the majority of the population. This guidance applies at both the task and performance step levels. An example of a supporting drill appears in figure 5-6.

5-10. Safety and environmental statements


a. The training developer includes the safety and environment statements to alert trainers to their responsibilities regarding Soldier safety and environmental concerns during training. Leaders and trainers are required to perform a risk assessment using the current composite risk management worksheet.
b. Integrate safety, risk, and environmental protection considerations into training materials where appropriate. The training developer:
(1) Includes appropriate safety, risk, and environmental protection statements; cautions; notes; and warnings in all training products.
(2) Identifies the risk and assigns an initial risk assessment to every training product designated in the CAC-approved automated development system.
(3) Coordinates with and obtains approval from the branch safety manager for all training products regarding safety and risk management issues. Figure 5-7 shows the required safety and environmental statements that must appear in each collective task. Additional safety or environmental issues may be addressed as additions to these statements.

Figure 5-7. Safety and environmental statements



5-11. Opposing forces (OPFOR) tasks and standards


OPFOR tasks are those tasks that have an opposing relevance to the collective task being performed. Choose at least one OPFOR task that has the most opposing relevance to the collective task. Limit the list of OPFOR tasks to those that are the most likely threat courses of actions rather than creating an exhaustive list of OPFOR options. For example, if the collective task is Conduct an Attack, the OPFOR task with most opposing relevance would be Conduct a Defense. Do not list an OPFOR task that would require a unit to stop performing the collective task and begin performing a different collective task to respond appropriately to the OPFOR. For example, Conduct an Ambush would not be an appropriate OPFOR task for a BLUFOR Conduct Operational Decontamination task because it would require the unit to stop performing the decontamination task in order to respond to the ambush. Also note that battalion and above echelon mission command tasks are primarily technical, rather than tactical, and should not include OPFOR tasks. An example of OPFOR tasks and standards appears in figure 5-8.

Figure 5-8. OPFOR tasks and standards example



5-12. Equipment and materiel


Equipment and materiel are the resources that have relevance to the task being trained. For collective tasks, the inclusion of equipment and materiel items is limited to those that have relevance to the target population being trained. For example, it would be appropriate to add the M256A1 Chemical Agent Detector Kit to a Conduct an Operational Decontamination task, but it would not be appropriate to add an M1A2 Abrams tank as an equipment item to the task. All elements will require the M256A1 Chemical Agent Detector Kit to perform the decontamination, but the M1A2 Abrams tank is only relevant in describing the table of equipment for a few specific units that must perform the task.



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