Training development in support of the operational domain


-3. Design the individual task condition



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7-3. Design the individual task condition

a. The individual task condition describes under what circumstances the task must be performed. It also lists what materials, personnel, and equipment must be provided for task accomplishment.


Example: Given an operational petroleum laboratory in a field or garrison environment…
b. Special conditions. A special condition is an aiding or limiting factor that occasionally occurs and affects a Soldier’s ability to perform the task to the established standard. These special conditions include, but are not limited to, wearing of mission oriented protective posture level 4 (MOPP 4), night vision devices (NVD), or self-contained breathing apparatus when performing the task. These unique circumstances are identified as separate special condition statements when conducting the individual task analysis, and are also entered under the conditions tab in the CAC-approved automated development system.
c. Writing special condition statements. Once changes to the task performance standard caused by performing the task under a special condition are identified, developers must include them. When writing a special condition statement, be aware that:
(1) More than one special condition simultaneously may affect task performance.
(2) A special condition may affect such standards as speed or accuracy.
d. See figure 7-3 for rules and information about writing individual task condition statements.

Figure 7-3. Writing individual task condition statements



7-4. Design the individual task standard


The standard describes the acceptable level of performance. It notes how well someone should perform the task to be considered competent. The standard must include both the performance and the criteria. It must be objective, valid, reliable, usable, comprehensive, discriminating, and quantifiable. Criteria may include, but are not limited to, accuracy, quantity, speed, and quality. Parts of an example standard statement might be: Fire all 18 rounds (performance) and hit the target at least nine times (criterion). See figure 7-4 for rules and information about writing individual task standard statements.

Figure 7-4. Writing individual task standards



7-5. Develop performance steps


A task is composed of procedures that represent interim outcomes achieved during the completion of the task (for example, Set the rear sight to the center). Each procedure describes the action and decision steps necessary to achieve the interim outcome in language that is detailed enough that the target audience will understand how to perform the step. A performance step is a single discrete operation, movement, action or decision that composes part of a procedure or task. Number all performance steps alphanumerically. Performance steps are written using a present tense verb and object format. A performance step is an action or decision that an individual must accomplish in order to perform an individual task to standard. When developing performance steps, ensure the use of terms and level of detail is appropriate for the target population.
a. A performance step sentence should include a description of the present tense action and a quantitative or qualitative remark.
b. Use notes only when necessary. Before adding a note to a performance step, assess the applicability of adding the information to an existing performance step or as an additional performance step. Refer to TR 25-30 for definitions on safety matters.
c. In some circumstances, individual tasks may be linked to another individual task rather than integrated as performance steps.
d. An example of performance steps and substeps from an approved individual task appears in figure 7-5.

Figure 7-5. Individual task performance steps example




7-6. Develop performance measures


Performance measures are actions that are objectively observable, qualitative, and quantitative, and that can be used to determine if a performance step or substep is satisfactorily achieved. Performance measures are numbered alphanumerically. Performance measures are written using a past tense verb and object format. When developing performance measures for an individual task, ensure the performance measures are constructed using terms and equipment names that are specific for the units and proponents that train the task. Before adding a note to a performance measure, assess the applicability of adding the information to an existing performance measure or as an additional performance measure. These measures are derived from the task performance steps and substeps during task analysis. See figure 7-6.

Figure 7-6. Writing individual task performance measures



7-7. Identify task linkages

a. An individual task should support one or more collective tasks and may support one or more individual tasks or drills.


b. Any prerequisite individual tasks need to be linked to the individual task being developed. For example, the prerequisite task Zero an M16A4 Rifle/M4-Series Carbine would be linked to the task Engage Targets with an M16A4 Rifle/M4-Series Carbine. Each task must reflect current and emerging doctrine.
c. An individual task must be linked to any supported collective task on which it has a first order effect within the CAC-approved automated development system.
Example: The individual task Engage Targets with an M16A4 Rifle/M4-Series Carbine would have a first order effect on the collective tasks Conduct an Attack and Conduct a Defense.
d. An individual task should be linked to a supported drill on which it has a first order effect. The developer works with a SME to identify the appropriate tasks.
Example: Engage Targets with an M16A4 Rifle/M4-Series Carbine would have a first order effect on the drill task React to Ambush (Near).
e. The example in figure 7-7 illustrates task linkages.

Figure 7-7. Task linkages with individual tasks





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