VFellowship Research Project Proposal that is a discipline-specific research project



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vFellowship Research Project Proposal that is

a discipline-specific research project

WITH

a faculty-student vocation-as-calling component


The Providential Tourist: Travel and the Vocation of Stoic Wisdom


Dr. William O. Stephens
Summer 2005
[Submitted February 11, 2005]

I. My Vocation


I ask for funding to do a summer research project. However, it is important to see this project in a broader framework, that is, my vocation as a philosophy professor at a Jesuit university. One of the things I love about my calling at Creighton is the ability to combine the professional and the personal elements of life. Creighton affords me the opportunity to combine my passion for philosophical truth, my deep and abiding care for my students’ well-being, my devotion to animals and their welfare, and my principled vegetarianism, to name but a few. It is in the environment of this particular university that I have been empowered to synthesize a powerful view of the earth as a good thing and people as stewards of it.

I share my deeply held views with those in the Christian, Catholic, and Jesuit tradition. My passion for the truth is of course identical to the Catholic Church’s devotion to the truth as expressed by Pope John Paul II. My care for my students as whole persons manifest the distinctly Jesuit cura personalis. My awareness of animals and the greater good of creation reflects the view of the world expressed in Genesis 1:31, in which God finds the world ‘very good.’ Nevertheless, it is important to note that although my central values are identical to or harmonious with those of the Jesuit, Catholic tradition, they issue from different intellectual origins. This is not a weakness of my project, but rather one of its vital strengths. One of the reasons I am particularly excited about participating in Cardoner is that I am eager to engage with my colleagues who begin from different philosophical and religious backgrounds, and I look forward to identifying areas of common ground and shared vision. Indeed one of the challenges confronting the Church is the need to find common ground with others in a pluralistic world. The Cardoner project is a wonderful opportunity for people who experience and express vocation in different ways to identify and pursue common goods.

My professional activities reflect my commitment to these shared values: (1) co-founding the Waste Reduction Advising Committee (Dr. Beverly Kracher and I initiated the recycling program at Creighton), (2) creation of Environmental Ethics course at Creighton, (3) teaching and research on ethical vegetarianism, (4) research on ethics and animals, (5) promoting legislation that protects animals as the Nebraska State Coordinator of the Humane Society of the United States, (6) upholding the priority of persons emphasized in the College of Arts & Sciences Identity Statement through my work on Creighton’s University Committee on Academic Freedom and Responsibility, (7) serving on the Committee for the Professional Rights of Philosophers for the American Philosophical Association, (8) serving the Creighton chapter of the American Association of University Professors (this year as President, last year as Vice President). (See section V. below.)

I want to collaborate with and mentor a student on this project. Ms. Claire Climer, an Honors student, is interested in my Stoicism course and my research on Stoicism. By reflecting on Stoic ethical ideas we will together explore her vocation-as-calling.
II. The Project
Stoicism profoundly influenced early Christianity, and so it is no surprise that they share a number of key elements. One of the most central is the idea of providence. The Stoics believed that the universe is rationally organized and providentially governed. My summer project is to investigate how the Stoics’ understanding of divine providence adumbrates their philosophy of travel—hence my title: The Providential Tourist. Up to now no one has sought to construct and articulate, within the Stoics’ providential theology, the motivations and proper mindset of the philosophically reflective traveler. Seneca and Epictetus provide plenty of texts from which to create an account of how a Stoic travels within a providential cosmos. Both of these thinkers have received more careful attention and exegetical scrutiny in the last several years, and consequently our understanding of several aspects of their distinctive brands of Stoicism has been enriched. Yet neither has been studied in order to develop a coherent view of the Stoic approach to travel, despite the fact that travel was so common for so many in the ancient Greco-Roman world.

Travel deserves philosophical examination now more than ever. Americans wonder how safe airline travel is post 9/11. Is it reasonable to fear terrorist attacks on commercial plane flights? How should we weigh considerations of safety, convenience, and aggravation when deliberating on whether to take a trip by plane, train, or automobile? What practical considerations guide our judgments about where to live when we calculate how long a commute to our workplace is tolerable? Are these practical considerations guided by sound philosophical reasoning? Is international travel riskier than domestic travel? Should we curtail our freedom to travel whenever and wherever we want and by whatever means we like in order to make ourselves and our families safer? Would doing so signal a victory for terrorists? Is it courageous to travel on flights to major American cities, knowing that such cities are likelier targets of terrorist attacks? How much do we travel because we need to? How much do we travel because we want to? Is travel outside the city we live in ever really necessary? Given the personal risks, financial costs, and environmental harms caused by larger vehicles, what philosophy of travel is conceptually coherent and ethically defensible? Finally, how should one deal with all the uncertainties and hazards of travel?

Stoicism provides rich conceptual resources for addressing this host of questions. Travel was popular and often perilous in the ancient world. Sea travel was particularly dangerous and shipwrecks caused many to drown. Bandits could raid caravans. Even one’s fellow travelers might steal from, assault, or murder the unlucky. So it is no surprise that wealthy philosophers such as Seneca and teachers of modest means such as Epictetus (who was an ex-slave) discussed these concerns. Yet their ideas on the philosophy of travel and its relation to belief in divine providence have not been explored. A Stoic traveler does not worry about factors beyond his control, Epictetus thinks, because a virtuous person can adapt to whatever challenges providence puts in his path. But how does such a ‘providential tourist’ deliberate about the logistics of particular journeys and when to take them? What obligations should motivate our travels? Reconstructing the Stoic account of travel is a promising way fruitfully to address contemporary philosophical concerns about travel. Consequently, my project is (a) worthwhile from the perspective of applied ethics, (b) pertinent to citizens of industrialized nations who are affluent enough to travel widely, (c) timely given the millions of dollars Americans spend on travel every year, and (d) a significant and creative contribution to scholarly work on Seneca, Epictetus, and the Stoicism of the Roman imperial period.
The Ethics of the Stoic Epictetus (Stephens 2000a) is my English translation of Bonhöffer’s second book on Epictetus (Bonhöffer 1894), and it provides the most comprehensive background for my broader project on Epictetus’ ethics. The influence of Plato’s portrayal of Socrates on Epictetus’ pedagogy has been explicated by Long (2002). My study of Long’s book (Stephens 2002, 2003) will provide the necessary theoretical groundwork for situating Epictetus’ philosophy of travel. For example, Long’s discussion of Epictetus’ views of god and divine providence will inform my study of how his views of providence shape his views of how to understand travel and exile in ancient Rome. In addition, the book I just reviewed (Inwood 2003) contains a chapter on Stoic Theology that elucidates the Stoic conception of providence, including Epictetus’ views, with which I will engage in my project.

A contemporary attempt to naturalize Stoic ethics is offered by Becker (1998); reviewed (Stephens 2000b). Becker rejects appeals to divine providence in his neo-stoic account. I will explore whether the providential outlook is essential to an identifiably ‘Stoic’ philosophy of travel. Becker’s outline of practical agency is a challenging account of what is, and what is not, essential to Stoic ethics. Bobzien (1998) and Dorothea Frede (Ch. 7 in Inwood 2003) study how well, or how poorly, their causal determinism meshed with the Stoics’ account of moral responsibility. I will defend the compatibilist interpretation of Stoic determinism in constructing the philosophy of travel in Seneca and Epictetus.

How useful is the Stoics’ rigorously rationalistic approach to everyday worries? My views on the success of the Stoic approach to contemporary practical problems and emotional distress address this issue (Stephens 2000b, 2003). I concur with Sorabji (1997, 2000) in contending that Stoic psychotherapy—that is, a rational analysis of irrational causes of anxiety—can be an effective remedy to psychological disorders such as fear arising from ignorance or misunderstanding.

The central role of prohairesis, i.e. ‘choice’ (or ‘volition’ as translated by Long (2002)), in Epictetus’ account of agency is treated by Dobbin (1991). Epictetus’ understanding of shame and self-respect is examined by Kamtekar (1998). These studies, along with Long (2002), will support my investigation of Epictetus’ conception of the self, its responsibilities, and its orientation to questions about travel. Comparing his notion of the self with Seneca’s comments on voluntas (discussed in Kahn 1988) will ground the questions in applied ethics that constitute the primary focus of my project by providing a rough sketch of the moral psychologies at work in Seneca and Epictetus.

I prefer to be compensated with a stipend June 1, 2005. This v-Fellowship will allow me to postpone my sabbatical stipend until summer 2006, and thereby advance the completion of both this particular project and the larger book project of which it is a part.
Select Bibliography
Becker, Lawrence C. A New Stoicism (Princeton, 1998).

Bobzien, Susanne. Determinism and Freedom in Stoic Philosophy (Oxford, 1998).

Bonhöffer, Adolf. Epictet und die Stoa (Stuttgart, 1890).

Dobbin, Robert. “Πρoαίρεσις in Epictetus,” Ancient Philosophy 11 (1991): 111–135.

______. Epictetus. Discourses Book 1; translated with an introduction and commentary. (Oxford, 1998).

Hijmans Jr., B. L. ΑΣΚΗΣIΣ: Notes on Epictetus’ Educational System (Assen, 1959).

Inwood, Brad, Ed. The Cambridge Companion to the Stoics (Cambridge, 2003).

Kahn, Charles. “Discovering the will: from Aristotle to Augustine,’ in Dillon and Long, The Question of ‘Eclecticism’ (Berkeley, 1988), 234–259.

Kamtekar, R. “ΑIΔΩΣ in Epictetus,” Classical Philology 93 (1998): 136–160.

Long, A. A. Epictetus: A Stoic and Socratic Guide to Life (Oxford, 2002).

______. Stoic Studies (Cambridge, 1996).

______. “Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius,” in J. Luce, ed., Ancient Writers: Greece and Rome (New York, 1982), 985–1002.

Oldfather, W. A. Contributions Toward a Bibliography of Epictetus = University of Illinois Bulletin 25 (Urbana, 1927).

______. Epictetus I and II. Loeb Classical Library (Cambridge, 1925 and 1928).

Schenkl, H., ed. Epicteti Dissertationes ab Arriano Digestae, 2nd edn. (Leipzig, 1916).

Sorabji, Richard. Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (New York, 2000).

_________. “Is Stoic Philosophy Helpful as Psycho-Therapy?” in Sorabji, ed. Aristotle and After (Institute of Classical Studies, suppl. 68, London, 1997)

Stephens, W. O. and Feezell, R. “The Ideal of the Stoic Sportsman,” The Journal of the Philosophy of Sport XXXI (2004): 196–211.

Stephens, W. O. “Stoic Ethics,” The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, J. Fieser, general editor (Oct. 2003).

______. Review of Die Funktion der Dialogstruktur in Epiktets Diatriben. By Barbara Wehner. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag, 2000 and Epictetus: A Stoic and Socratic guide to life. By A. A. Long. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002, in Ancient Philosophy XXIII, no. 2 (Fall 2003): 472–481.

______. Review of Epictetus: A Stoic and Socratic Guide to Life. By A. A. Long. Oxford University Press, 2002. Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2002.11.03.

______. The Ethics of the Stoic Epictetus; an English translation of Adolf Bonhöffer, Die Ethik des Stoikers Epictet. (New York, 2nd ed. 2000a).

______. “A Stoicism for Our Time?” International Journal of the Classical Tradition 6, no. 3 (Winter 2000b).

______. “Epictetus on How the Stoic Sage Loves”, Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy XIV (1996) 193–210.

Striker, Gisela. “Following nature: A study in Stoic ethics,” Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 9 (1991): 1–73.

Wehner, Barbara. Die Dialogstruktur in Epiktets Diatriben (Stuttgart, 2000).

Veyne, Paul. Seneca: The Life of a Stoic (Routledge: New York, 2003).

III. Participation in the Community of Faculty


I believe I can share the wisdom I find in Stoic authors with the community of faculty who will participate in this program. Stoicism has deeply influenced Christianity from its inception. First, I can contribute to participants’ understanding of their vocations as embedded in their lived Christian experience by developing a dialogue between Stoic moral philosophy and Christian moral teaching. The deep and fascinating interplay between Stoic providential theology and Christian theology will provide insights to help participants reflect on, enrich, and renew their personal commitments to their particular vocations. The understanding gleaned from my scholarly work on Stoic philosophy, and Stoic ethics in particular, will allow my voice in the dialogue to be authentic and salutary. I am eager to show that Stoic strategies for effectively dealing with practical challenges flow from an inner, spiritual strength. This spiritual strength harmonizes with the Christian, Catholic, Jesuit spiritual tradition and promises to benefit the other v-fellows. In turn, I expect to benefit from their diverse perspectives, the variety of their lived experiences of vocation, and their disciplinary expertise in reflecting on my vocation. I am ignorant of and curious about many aspects of Christian vocation and the Ignatian spiritual exercises. My fellow participants can educate me on such subjects, thereby enriching my reflections on vocation. Comparing the intellectual and spiritual underpinnings of my vocation with theirs will, I am confident, produce a very promising and fruitful exchange.
IV. Schedule and Plan for the Project
Schedule

I anticipate 8–10 weeks of Summer 2005 to complete this paper. The first week or so I will collect the texts I need from Seneca, Epictetus, and the secondary literature. The remaining weeks I will compose the paper itself. I will be in regular email contact with Claire Climer. I will also meet with her four times in person over the summer.


Plan

This project will be Chapter 6 of my on-going eight-chapter book plan. I will submit it for publication to either Practical Philosophy (which has already invited me to submit my paper to it), Ancient Philosophy, Apeiron, The Journal of the History of Philosophy, or The Stoic Voice Journal. (The second and fourth have published my book reviews previously; the fifth published an article of mine previously.)

My summer project fits into this book plan, which is my sabbatical project for AY 2005–06 (if I am not awarded this v-Fellowship, then I will take my sabbatical stipend the summer of 2005; if I do receive this v-Fellowship, then I will take the sabbatical stipend the summer of 2006):

Stoic Student, Educator, and Liberator: Lessons from Epictetus:

Ch. 1. Socrates and Stoic Heroism in Epictetus (in progress).

Ch. 2. Musonius Rufus, Epictetus, and Flavius Arrianus (planned).

Ch. 3. ta\ e0f’ h9mi=n and ta\ ou0k e0f’ h9mi=n : The Logic of Freedom (planned).

Ch. 4. Epictetus’ Zoo: The Use of Animal Examples in Stoic Pedagogy (in progress).

Ch. 5. Epictetus’ Games: The Stoic Sport Metaphor (earlier version “The Ideal of the Stoic Sportsman,” Journal of the Philosophy of Sport XXXI (2004): 196–211).

Ch. 6. The Providential Tourist: Travel and the Vocation of Stoic Wisdom (this is project to be funded).

Ch. 7. Halloween Masks Only Scare Kids: Epictetus on Death and Suicide (in progress).

Ch. 8. The Stoic Lover and Educator (earlier version “Epictetus on How the Stoic Sage Loves,” Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy XIV (1996): 193–210).
Library Trips
I will need to make use of Schenkl’s 1916 critical edition of Epictetus’ Discourses and secondary literature in German on Seneca and Epictetus that Reinert Library lacks. So I will travel to Chicago to use the Newberry Library (where I am a registered Reader) and the University of Chicago library. Four trips should be sufficient. (If necessary, I can request this funding from the Graduate School.)
$ 100 roundtrip airfare on Southwest Airlines

$ 3.50 Chicago Transit Authority Orange Line from Midway Airport to the Loop

$ 20 cab fare to and from libraries

x 4 trips = Total supplemental travel budget requested = $494.00 travel costs


V. Curriculum Vitae

William O. Stephens, Ph.D.


Chair, Department of Classical and Near Eastern Studies
Associate Professor of Philosophy and of Classical and Near Eastern Studies

EMPLOYMENT


Creighton University Associate Professor of Philosophy and of Classical & Near Eastern Studies,
    March 1997 to present (tenured March 1996)
Creighton University Assistant Professor of Philosophy, August 1990 to March 1997


FELLOWSHIPS, GRANTS and AWARDS


  • Omicron Delta Kappa nominee for the Teaching for Tomorrow Award, Creighton University, January 31, 2005

  • Biography ID# 1494630 in Who's Who Among America's Teachers®, 2003–2004

  • Omicron Delta Kappa nominee for the Teaching for Tomorrow Award, Creighton University, January 30, 2002

  • Creighton University Office of Institutional Research & Assessment 2002 summer assessment grant for the Philosophy Dept. Assessment Committee

  • Visiting Scholar at the Department of Classics, University of California, Berkeley, January 13 to December 18, 1999

  • Affiliated Scholar at The Ethics Center, University of South Florida (100 Fifth Avenue South, St. Petersburg, FL), August 24 to December 22, 1998

  • Creighton University 1998 Summer Research Fellowship: Socrates and Stoic Heroism in Epictetus

  • Center for Hellenic Studies Summer Scholar, June 25 to August 6, 1997, Washington, D.C.

  • William F. Kelley, S.J. Outstanding Service Achievement Award for the Waste Reduction Advisory Committee of Creighton University, received Sept. 26, 1996

  • US WEST Academic Development and Technology Fellowship, Creighton Univ. Summer 1995.  View my 12.5 minute exit interview mpg.

  • National Endowment for the Humanities travel stipend to participate in: Duty, Interest & Practical Reason: Aristotle, Kant & the Stoics, organized by the Program in Classics, Philosophy & Ancient Science, University of Pittsburgh, March 18–20, 1994

  • Creighton University 1993 Summer Faculty Development Grant: How to Write Philosophy Papers: A Manual

  • Creighton University 1992 Summer Research Fellowship: Epictetus Ethics of Stoic Love and Happiness as Freedom


EDUCATION


The College of Wooster (Wooster, Ohio) Sept. 1980 – June 1982
Earlham College (Richmond, Indiana) Sept. 1982 – June 1984
B.A. in philosophy received June 1984
       Honors Received:
            Phi Beta Kappa (Delta Chapter of Indiana)
            Departmental Honors in Philosophy
            College Honors
            Georgia M. Watkins Scholarship in Greek & Latin

The University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia) Sept. 1984 – May 1990
Ph.D. in philosophy received May 1990
University Teaching Fellowship Sept. 1984 – May 1990
dissertation: Stoic strength: an examination of the ethics of Epictetus
supervisor: Charles H. Kahn, Professor of Philosophy, The University of Pennsylvania
other committee members:
    Alexander Nehamas, Professor of Philosophy and Professor of the Humanities and of Comparative Literature, Princeton University
    John M. Cooper, Stuart Professor of Philosophy, Princeton University
    R. Jay Wallace, Professor of Philosophy, University of California, Berkeley

AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION


Classical Greek Philosophy (Thales through Aristotle), Hellenistic Philosophy (Epicureanism, Stoicism, Skepticism), and Ethics.

AREAS OF COMPETENCE


History of Modern Philosophy, 19th century German Philosophy, Neo-Platonism, History of Ethics, Ethics and Animals, Environmental Philosophy, Logic.

LANGUAGES


Classical Greek, Latin, and German


PUBLICATIONS

BOOKS


  • The Person: Readings in Human Nature. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, forthcoming © 2005, ISBN 0-13-184811-9.

  • Adolf F. Bonhöffer, The Ethics of the Stoic Epictetus: An English translation* (with a biography of A.F.B. by Constantine Ritter), William O. Stephens, translator. New York: Peter Lang, 1996, ISBN 0-8204-3027-7 hardcover; 2nd edition 2000, ISBN 0-8204-5139-8 paperback.

* Reviewed in:

  •    Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2001.08.41, by Scott M. Rubarth

  •    Journal of Hellenic Studies 120 (2000): 170–171, by Christopher Gill

  •    Ancient Philosophy XX, no. 2 (Fall 2000): 521–524, by Robert J. Rabel

  •    Classical Review 50, no. 1 (2000): 154–155, by George Boys-Stones

  •    Journal of the History of Philosophy XXXVII, no. 4 (Oct. 1999): 671–673, by Eric Brown

  •    Electronic Antiquity 3, no. 7 (May 1997), by Brad Inwood

ARTICLES


  • “Stoicism in the Stars: Yoda, the Emperor, and the Force,” in Star Wars and Philosophy, edited by K. Decker & J. Eberl in the Philosophy and Popular Culture series (Chicago: Open Court Publishing, forthcoming 2005).

  • Marcus Aurelius,” Meet the Philosophers of Ancient Greece, edited by Patricia O’Grady (Aldershot: Ashgate, forthcoming June 2005).

  • “To Cheer Without Fear: Could a Cubs Fan Be a Stoic?” (with Randolph Feezell) Creighton University Magazine (Winter 2004): 22–27.

  • “The Ideal of the Stoic Sportsman,” (with Randolph Feezell) The Journal of the Philosophy of Sport XXXI, no. 2 (2004): 196–211.

  • Stoic Ethics,” The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy Oct. 2003.

  • “Five Arguments for Vegetarianism” [abridged] The Animal Ethics Reader, edited by Susan J. Armstrong & Richard G. Botzler (London and New York: Routledge, 2003): 201–208.

  • If Friendship Hurts, an Epicurean Deserts: A Reply to Andrew Mitchell,” Essays in Philosophy 3, no. 1 (Jan. 2002).

  • The Rebirth of Stoicism?Creighton University Magazine (Winter 2000): 34–39.

  • Real Men Are Stoics: An interpretation of Tom Wolfe’s A Man in Full,” The Stoic Voice Journal 1, no. 3 (April 2000); [ISSN 1529-2835].

  • “Five Arguments for Vegetarianism,” reprinted in Environmental Ethics: Concepts, Policy, and Theory, Joseph DesJardins, ed. (Mountain View, CA: Mayfield Publishing Co., 1999): 288–301.

  • “Masks, Androids, and Primates: The Evolution of the Concept ‘Person’,” Etica & Animali 9, Special issue on Nonhuman Personhood (1998): 111–127.

  • “Epictetus,” The Historical Encyclopedia of World Slavery, two vols., edited by Junius P. Rodriguez (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO Press, 1997): 258.

  • “Seneca,” The Historical Encyclopedia of World Slavery, two vols., edited by Junius P. Rodriguez (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO Press, 1997): 573–574.

  • “Epictetus on How the Stoic Sage Loves,” Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy XIV** (1996): 193–210.
            ** reviewed in Bryn Mawr Classical Review 97.6.12 by Brad Inwood

  • “The Simile of the Talus in Cicero, De Finibus 3.16.54,” (with Brian S. Hook) Classical Philology 91, no. 1 (Jan. 1996): 59–61.

  • “Straying and Spaying: What Do Cats Care About?” Between the Species: A Journal of Ethics 11, no. 3 & 4 (Summer & Fall 1995): 111–113.

  • Five Arguments for Vegetarianism,” Philosophy in the Contemporary World 1, no. 4 (Winter 1994): 25–39.

  • “Stoic Naturalism, Rationalism, and Ecology,” Environmental Ethics 16, no. 3 (Fall 1994): 275–286.

  • “The Argument from Marginal Cases: Is Speciesism Defensible?” (with Randolph Feezell) Contemporary Philosophy 16, no. 4 (July/Aug. 1994): 7–16.

  • “Stoic Love in Epictetus,” Hellenistic Philosophy, Vol. II, edited by K. J. Boudouris, Studies in Greek Philosophy No. 12 (Athens, 1994): 216–224.

  • “The Fate Debate: Stoic Responses to Contemporary Reflections,” Contemporary Philosophy 15, no. 6 (Nov./Dec. 1993): 1–5.

REVIEW ARTICLE


“A Stoicism for Our Time?” (Lawrence C. Becker, A New Stoicism. Princeton Univ. Press, 1998). International Journal of the Classical Tradition 6, no. 3 (Winter 2000): 438–446.

REVIEWS


  • Simplicius, On Epictetus’ “Handbook 1–26 and 27–53” translated by Tad Brennan & Charles Brittain. Ithaca, NY: Cornell Univ. Press 2002. forthcoming Ancient Philosophy XXV, no. 1 (Spring 2005).

  • Die Funktion der Dialogstruktur in Epiktets Diatriben. By Barbara Wehner. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag, 2000 and Epictetus: A Stoic and Socratic guide to life. By A. A. Long. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002. Ancient Philosophy XXIII, no. 2 (Fall 2003): 472–481. 

  • Forgiveness and Revenge. By Trudy Govier. London and New York: Routledge, 2002. Essays in Philosophy 4, no. 2 (June 2003).

  • Epictetus: A Stoic and Socratic Guide to Life. By A. A. Long. Oxford University Press, 2002. Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2002.11.03.

  • Cato’s Tears and the Making of Anglo-American Emotion. By Julie Ellison. University of Chicago Press, 1999. International Journal of the Classical Tradition 8, no. 2 (Fall 2001): 319–322.

  • To Eat Flesh They Are Willing, Are Their Spirits Weak? Vegetarians Who Return to Meat. By Kristin Aronson. Pythagorean Publishers, 1996. Between the Species: An Electronic Journal for the Study of Philosophy and Animals, (August 2002).

  • Epictetus, Discourses Book I. Trans. with an introduction and commentary by Robert F. Dobbin. Oxford University Press, 1998. Bryn Mawr Classical Review 99.11.21.

  • Logic and the Imperial Stoa. By Jonathan Barnes. Brill, 1997. Journal of the History of Philosophy XXXVII, no. 2 (April 1999): 357–359.

  • Marcus Aurelius, Meditations. Trans. by Robin Hard; introduction and notes by Christopher Gill. Wordsworth Editions Limited, 1997. Bryn Mawr Classical Review 98.6.23.

  • Stoic Studies. By A. A. Long. Cambridge University Press, 1996. Bryn Mawr Classical Review 97.11.20.

  • Essays on Hellenistic Epistemology and Ethics. By Gisela Striker. Cambridge University Press, 1996. Bryn Mawr Classical Review 97.6.9.

  • The Case for Vegetarianism. By John Lawrence Hill. Rowman & Littlefield, 1996. Environmental Ethics 19, no. 2 (Summer 1997): 221–224.

  • The Discourses of Epictetus. Edited by Christopher Gill; trans. revised by Robin Hard. Everyman, 1995. Ancient Philosophy XVII, no. 1 (Spring 1997): 268–273.

  • Introducing New Gods: The Politics of Athenian Religion. By Robert Garland. Cornell University Press, 1992. Ancient Philosophy XV, no. 2 (Fall 1995): 598–601.

  • Animal Minds and Human Morals: The Origins of the Western Debate. By Richard Sorabji. Cornell University Press, 1993. International Journal of the Classical Tradition 1, no. 4 (Spring 1995): 147–150.

  • Lukrez, der Kepos und die Stoiker. By Jürgen Schmidt. Peter Lang, 1990. Ancient Philosophy XIV, no. 2 (Fall 1994): 461–463.

  • Why me? A Philosophical Inquiry into Fate. By Michael Gelven. Northern Illinois University Press, 1991. Man & World 26 (1993): 351–354.

BOOK CHAPTER


“The Ethics of Environmental Mediation,” (with J. B. Stephens & F. Dukes) Ch. 12 of Mediating Environmental Conflicts: Theory and Practice, edited by J. Walton Blackburn & Willa Marie Bruce (Westport, CT: Quorum Books, 1995): 167–184.

PEDAGOGICAL MANUAL


How to Write Philosophy Papers: A Manual for Beginning Philosophy Students (Creighton University, 1993).


CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS


  • Stoic Student, Educator, and Liberator: Lessons from Epictetus, a book to contain:
                Chapter 1. Socrates and Stoic Heroism in Epictetus (in progress)
                Chapter 2. Musonius Rufus, Epictetus, and Flavius Arrianus (planned)
                Chapter 3. The Logic of Freedom (planned)
                Chapter 4. Epictetus’ Zoo: The Use of Animal Examples in Stoic Pedagogy (in progress)
                Chapter 5. Epictetus’ Games: The Stoic Sport Metaphor (in progress)
                Chapter 6. The Providential Tourist (planned)
                Chapter 7. Epictetus on Death and Suicide (in progress)
                Chapter 8. The Stoic Lover and Educator (earlier version published in OSAP XIV as “Epictetus on How the Stoic Sage Loves”)
     

  • Review of The Cambridge Companion to the Stoics, ed. Brad Inwood. New York: Cambridge Univ. Press (2003) for The Classical Journal.

  • Review of Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy XXVI (Summer 2004) for Bryn Mawr Classical Review.


LECTURES & CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS


  • “Too Manly by Half?  Stoicism in Tom Wolfe’s A Man in Full” (with Geoffrey W. Bakewell) presented to the Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities, January 11, 2004, Honolulu, Hawaii.

  • Beastly Virtues: Animal Exempla in Seneca and Epictetus” presented to the panel on Roman Virtues, Vices and Cultural History at the American Philological Association Meeting, January 5, 2004, San Francisco, California.

  • “To Cheer without Fear: The Stoic Sportsman” presented to the Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities, January 14, 2003, Honolulu, Hawaii.

  • Commentary on Sabine Grebe, “The Transformation of the Husband/Wife Relationship during Exile: Letters from Cicero and Ovid” presented to the Society for the Philosophy of Sex & Love, at the American Philosophical Association Central Division Meeting, April 25, 2002, Chicago, Illinois.

  • Commentary on A. J. Mitchell, “Friendship Amongst the Self-Sufficient: Epicurus” presented to the Society for the Philosophy of Sex & Love, at the American Philosophical Association Central Division Meeting, April 22, 2000, Chicago, Illinois.

  • Real Men Are Stoics: An interpretation of Tom Wolfe’s A Man in Full,” presented to the Nebraska Beta Chapter of Phi Sigma Tau, the National Honor Society in Philosophy, March 28, 2000, Creighton University.

  • The Manliness of Stoicism in Tom Wolfe’s A Man in Full,” presented to the Society for Philosophy in the Contemporary World, at the conference on Time, History, and Social Change, August 13, 1999, Estes Park Center, Colorado.

  • “Epictetus’ Use of Animal Examples” presented to the UCB Department of Classics graduate seminar on Epictetus led by A. A. Long, Irving Stone Professor of Literature and Professor of Classics, at the University of California, Berkeley, March 31, 1999.

  • “Stoic Happiness?” presented at The Ethics Center of the University of South Florida, December 2, 1998, St. Petersburg, Florida (abstract published in Fall 1998 Newsletter).

  • “Epictetus on Death and Suicide, or Why Halloween Doesn’t Frighten Stoics” presented at the University of South Florida Philosophy Department Colloquium, October 30, 1998, Tampa, Florida.

  • “Masks, Androids, and Primates: The Evolution of the Concept ‘Person’” presented to the Society for the Study of Ethics and Animals with commentary by Kent Baldner, Western Michigan University, at the American Philosophical Association Central Division Meeting, May 7, 1998, Chicago, Illinois.

  • “Environmentalism and Vegetarianism,” a speech delivered at Earth Day Omaha, Heartland of America Park (8th and Douglas Streets, Omaha), April 26, 1998.

  • “Epictetus on the Irrationality of Fearing Death and Reasons for Suicide” presented at the Iowa State University Philosophy Department Colloquium, February 26, 1998, Ames, Iowa.

  • “Epictetus on the Irrationality of Fearing Death and Reasons for Suicide” presented at the conference on Global and Multicultural Dimensions of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy, sponsored by the Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy and the Society for the Study of Islamic Philosophy and Science, October 24-26, 1997, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York.

  • Commentary on Laura Duhan Kaplan “Love’s Longing Fulfilled: Metaphysical Comfort and Plato’s Symposium” presented to the Society for the Philosophy of Sex & Love, at the American Philosophical Association Central Division Meeting, April 24, 1997, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

  • “Animal Virtues and Human Vices: Epictetus’ Philosophical Zoology” presented at the Northern Illinois University Philosophy Department Colloquium, April 11, 1997, DeKalb, Illinois.

  • “Socrates, Aristotle, Epicurus, and Epictetus on the Rationality of Fearing Death” presented at the Purdue University Philosophy Department Colloquium, March 6, 1997, West Lafayette, Indiana.

  • “Epictetus on Animalitarianism” presented to the Society for the Study of Ethics and Animals with commentary by Alan Schwerin, Monmouth University, at the American Philosophical Association Eastern Division Meeting, December 28, 1996, Atlanta, Georgia.

  • “Socrates: Epictetus’ Stoic Hero” presented to the Australasian Society for Ancient Philosophy at its conference at Massey University, August 31, 1996, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

  • “Four Ancient Perspectives on Everyday Death” presented to the Society for Philosophy in the Contemporary World, at the conference on Philosophy and Everyday Life, August 12, 1996, Estes Park Center, Colorado.

  • Commentary on Clifton B. Perry “Students, Teachers, and Carnal Knowledge,” Mountain-Plains Philosophy Conference, October 27, 1995, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  • “Can a Stoic Love?” presented to the Society for the Philosophy of Sex and Love with commentary by Martha C. Nussbaum, Ernst Freund Professor of Law and Ethics, University of Chicago Law School, at the American Philosophical Association Central Division Meeting, April 27, 1995, Chicago, Illinois.

  • “Five Arguments for Vegetarianism,” presented to the Society for the Study of Ethics and Animals with commentary by Brian A. Luke, Univ. of Dayton, at the American Philosophical Association Central Division Meeting, April 28, 1995, Chicago, Illinois.

  • “Environmental Ethics,” a talk given to the Environmental Justice Workshop sponsored by the Nebraska State Recycling Association, April 26, 1995, Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska.

  • Commentary on Lilly-Marlene Russow, “What Do Animals Care About?” presented to the Society for the Study of Ethics and Animals, at the American Philosophical Association Pacific Division Meeting, March 30, 1995, San Francisco, California.

  • Commentary on John Ferguson Heil, “Why is Aristotle’s Brave Man So Frightened? The Paradox of Courage in the Eudemian Ethics” presented at the American Philosophical Association Eastern Division Meeting, December 28, 1994, Boston, Massachusetts.

  • “Five Arguments for Vegetarianism” presented to the Society for Philosophy in the Contemporary World, with commentary by Peter Singer, Ira W. DeCamp Professor of Bioethics, University Center for Human Values, Princeton University, at the conference on Philosophy and Cultural Diversity, August 16, 1994, Estes Park Center, Colorado.

  • “The Argument from Marginal Cases: Why Speciesism is Indefensible” Willard Environmental Ethics Symposium, April 15, 1993, The University of Nebraska at Omaha.

  • “Was Socrates a Stoic?” presented at the Central States Philosophical Association Meeting, October 16, 1992, The University of Kansas, Lawrence.

  • “The Fate Debate: Stoic Responses to Contemporary Reflections,” presented at the Mountain-Plains Philosophy Conference, October 9, 1992, Washburn University, Topeka, Kansas.

  • “Stoic Love,” presented at the International Association for Greek Philosophy Fourth International Conference, on Hellenistic Philosophy, August 28, 1992, Rhodes, Greece.

  • “Nietzsche’s Eternal Recurrence,” presented to the Nebraska Beta Chapter of Phi Sigma Tau, the National Honor Society in Philosophy, October 10, 1990, Creighton University.


OFFICES


  • President of the Creighton University Chapter of the American Association of University Professors, Oct. 2004 to Sept. 2005.

  • Vice President of the Creighton University Chapter of the American Association of University Professors, Oct. 2003 to Sept. 2004.

  • Secretary-Treasurer of the Creighton University Chapter of the American Association of University Professors, Oct. 2002 to Sept. 2003.

  • Member of the Committee for Defense of Professional Rights of Philosophers, American Philosophical Association, Nov. 2002 to June 2005, July 2005 to June 2008.

  • Nebraska State Coordinator for The Humane Society of the United States (July 1998 to present).  See also the Greater Nebraska Animal Rights League.

  • Referee for the journals Ancient Philosophy, Environmental Ethics, and Social Theory & Practice.

  • Referee for the Society for Philosophy in the Contemporary World conferences and Editorial Review Board member of the journal Philosophy in the Contemporary World: ISSN 1077-1999, Spring 1997 to present.

  • Referee for McGraw-Hill Higher Education, Macmillan Publishing Co., St. Martin’s Press, and Wadsworth Publishing Co.

  • Referee for the second annual Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities, Honolulu, January 8–11, 2004.

  • Referee for the Mountain-Plains Philosophy Conference, Santa Fe, New Mexico, October 26–28, 1995.

  • Local Arrangements Chair of the 1994 Mountain-Plains Philosophy Conference (keynote speaker: the late James Rachels, Professor of Philosophy, University of Alabama at Birmingham) Creighton University, October 20–22, 1994.


CREIGHTON UNIVERSITY SERVICE


  • Chair, Department of Classical & Near Eastern Studies, July 2003 to present.

  • College of Arts and Sciences Identity and Academic Planning Committee, May 2004 to May 2005.

  • College of Arts and Sciences Budget Committee, May 2003 to May 2004.

  • University Committee on Benefits, Aug. 2003 to May 2004.

  • Chair, College of Arts and Sciences Faculty Development Committee, Aug. 2002 to July 2003.

  • Faculty Moderator for the Creighton Chess & Games Club: Jan. 2001 to present.

  • Pre-Law Advising Committee: Aug. 1992 to present.

  • Faculty and Academic Councils: Aug. 2001 to July 2003.

  • Webmaster for the Department of Philosophy, 1998 to present.

  • Webmaster for the Department of Classical & Near Eastern Studies, 1998 to 2003.

  • Chair, Committee on Academic Freedom and Responsibility: Aug. 1997 to July 2000.

  • Co-founder, Waste Reduction Advisory Committee: Aug. 1994 to July 1998.

  • Committee on Academic Policy, Dismissals and Appeals: Aug. 1997 to July 2000.

  • University Committee on Student Discipline: Aug. 1994 to July 1997.

  • Faculty Development Committee: Aug. 1993 to July 1996.

  • Nebraska Easter Seal Society fund-raising event participant: June 17–18, 1995.

  • Faculty Advisor for the Nebraska Beta Chapter of Phi Sigma Tau, National Honor Society in Philosophy, Aug. 1991 to July 1995.


MEDIA PRESENTATIONS AND INTERVIEWS


The radio program Dateline: Creighton on KIOS 91.5 FM Thursdays at 11:30 a.m. features a philosophical therapy series I do with my colleague Dr. Michael Brown called Quieting Quandaries.  The first segment aired July 1, 2004 (.wma file).  The second aired September 30, 2004 (.wma file).

Prof. Wendy Wright, the Kenefick Humanities Chair, interviewed me February 20, 2003 about my book The Ethics of the Stoic Epictetus.  The interview (.wmv file) is on the DVD Books that Humanize.

Gary Smolen's interview of me on unsportsmanlike conduct (higher quality Windows Media Player file) (lower quality .wmv file) aired on Omaha's NBC affiliate WOWT Channel 6 ten o'clock news October 13, 2003.

I lecture on ancient Greek philosophers’ concepts of infinity (.wmv file) in the “Professors’ Notes” section of the Mannheim Steamroller Fresh Aire 8 DVD by Chip Davis (American Gramaphone 2001); I also provided research on the subject.



A segment of my interview about the Nebraska Vegetarian Society aired on Omaha’s ABC affiliate KETV Channel 7 five o’clock news March 21, 1998.

My interview on Creighton Close-Up about the Waste Reduction Program I was awarded for helping to create at Creighton University aired Feb. 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9, 1996.




COURSES TAUGHT


LOWER LEVEL

  • Introduction to the Problems of Philosophy (Penn)

  • Philosophy of Human Existence (PHL 205)

  • Critical and Historical Introduction to Philosophy (PHL 107)

  • Honors Critical and Historical Introduction to Philosophy (HRS/PHL 109)

  • Introduction to Logic (PHL 201)

  • Ethics (PHL 251)

  • Philosophical Foundations for Ethical Understanding (PHL 250)

  • Honors Philosophical Foundations for Ethical Understanding (HRS/PHL 253)

  • Critical Thinking (Penn)

UPPER LEVEL

  • Meaning in America (PHL 309)

  • God and Persons: Philosophical Reflections (PHL 320)

  • Honors God and Persons: Philosophical Reflections (HRS/PHL 323)

  • Environmental Ethics (PHL 354)

  • History of Ethics (PHL 359)

  • History of Ancient Philosophy (Penn & PHL 361)

  • History of Classical Greek Philosophy (CNE/PHL 370)

  • History of Hellenistic Philosophy (CNE/PHL 371)

  • History of Modern Philosophy (Penn)

  • Honors Philosophy Seminar: Stoicism (HRS/PHL 403 Spring 2002)

  • Honors Philosophy Seminar: Aristotle (HRS/PHL 403 Fall 2003)

  • Stoicism (CNE/PHL 410)

  • Plato & Platonism (CNE/PHL 460 Spring 2001)

  • Directed Independent Readings (PHL 493 Fall 2002 on Plato's Timaeus & Phaedo, Epicureanism, The Simpsons and Philosophy)

  • Directed Independent Study (PHL 495 Spring 2001 on Porphyry and Plotinus)


MEMBERSHIPS


  • American Philosophical Association, Central Division

  • American Philological Association

  • American Association of University Professors

  • Phi Beta Kappa

  • Phi Sigma Tau (National Honor Society in Philosophy)

  • Eta Sigma Phi (National Honor Society in Classics)

  • Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy

  • Society for Philosophy in the Contemporary World

  • Society for the Study of Ethics and Animals

  • The Humane Society of the United States

  • Nebraska Vegetarian Society, Omaha Chapter

  • American Civil Liberties Union

VI. Letter of Support


Since I am a department Chair (of Classical and Near Eastern Studies), Dr. Geoff Bakewell, a previous Chair of CANES, has written on my behalf.




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